Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Spring Semester Elective 2023
12 - 15 credits

SAI semester students in UPF’s elective programs enroll in upper division courses in one of two concentrations: Barcelona Program for Interdisciplinary Studies (BaPIS) or International Business (ESCI). Students enroll in 4 or 5 courses for a total of 12 to 15 US credits. Courses are available in both English and Spanish. While there is no requirement to enroll in a Spanish language course, UPF offers all levels of Spanish language, which can be combined with subject courses.


Application: now open
Closes: October 1, 2022
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (JPEG; passport style)
EU privacy consent form

Updates

  • Study liberal arts, Spanish language and culture, business, or international relations.
  • Courses integrate site visits, tours, and speaker sessions.

Program Dates
BaPIS: Jan 4, 2023 – March 24, 2023
ESCI: Jan 4, 2023 – March 25, 2023


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: Junior (3rd year) or above.

Cumulative GPA:* 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale)

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements



Barcelona Program for Interdisciplinary Studies
International Business (ESCI)

Barcelona Program for Interdisciplinary Studies

3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: TBA2 | Open
Study and critical analysis of ethnographic cinema and its relationship with avant-garde cinema, proving itself a fertile territory and full of possibilities, but that continues on the margins, between art halls and museums and ignored by industry. Both ends touch each other. In the margins of usual production, creativity, dedication and social and cultural commitment survive.
Both extremes are modes of representation of our culture and have many elements in common: their marginality, their creativity, a community of practitioners and followers, their influence on the cinematographic narrative of the real and fiction, and their questioning, in some cases, of the classic narrative.

The goal of this seminar is to provide the student with a basic, but professional, level of knowledge of ethnographic and the- so called- experimental or formalist filmmaking. The seminar includes a practical exercise where the student can discover his or her particular way of seeing Catalan or Spanish reality. During class sessions, students and the professor will meet and discuss the history and situation of the contemporary ethnographic and Avant-garde filmmaking.
Contact Hours: 45
This workshop will provide students with a possibility to acquire practical knowledge in creation of television fiction, in particular sitcoms. A course will begin with concise theoretical introduction, tackling notions of the way television articulate its contents, the importance of humor in our societies, psychology of humor, genres of TV fiction, narrative structures and formulas of different sitcom sub-types. The course will later develop through two stages: writing and directing of a brief sitcom scene. Students will form small teams, the aim of each group will be to come up with one complete sitcom scene at the end of the workshop. The writing segment of the workshop will take place in a classroom: under a supervision of a professor each student team should develop scripts for their sitcom scene. During this process students will gain basic insights to screenwriting for television, character and plot development and comedy writing. The directing section will take place in TV studio. Students will work with multi-camera system and shoot their written exercises. Under a supervision of a professor they will learn how to operate in a TV studio, manage cameras and other equipment, and direct actors. This workshop will foster creative expression, collective creativity, communication and collaboration on the common project, as well as critical thinking about television programs and the structure of TV industry. Through the workshop students will also learn about/acquire practical knowledge of creative work division in television production systems.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: TBA8 | Open
Throughout history, creativity has always been considered a mysterious and elusive phenomenon. The ancient Greeks believed that creativity arose from the divine inspiration and guidance of the muses. The Romans believed that each individual was born with a guardian entity, or genius, who would assist them in their lives and creative work. Come the Enlightenment, the popular explanation for creativity in the Western world shifted from divine sources to madness and chemically altered states. While much has changed in society, nowadays we still often see creativity as a mysterious and elusive special talent that’s only present in certain individuals. However, the historical connection between creativity and craft as well as growing research in the psychological and physiological characteristics of creativity tell us differently. In this course, we’ll seek to better understand creativity in order to awaken your own creative potential. We’ll start by briefly exploring humankind’s relationship to creativity throughout history, the myths and realities surrounding the creative process and creative individuals, and provide a basic understanding of what creativity is and how it works from a psychological and neuroscientific perspective. Throughout the entire course, we will draw upon a variety of interdisciplinary activities designed to allow you to readily access your creativity and help you to develop your own creative process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: 51810 | Open
Says author Yuval Harari, that the capacity to organize ourselves collectively through a fiction or an intangible or abstract concept agreement (such as money) is the singled-out most distinctive characteristic of humans beings vs other species. In the managerial sphere of brands, corporations and organizations of all sorts, the question today, is: Should money still be considered the most valuable asset? Will it disappear? What will it be replaced with? What is value and which are the values ruling our current-future society? Shifting paradigms are proposing new ideas and tools to face the now inevitable purpose of maintaining our own sustainability: both as organizations and as humans. In so, how do rising collective responses differ from the individualistic approaches of the last Century? In the challenge but also the opportunity of our times, what kind of world do we want to live in and how are we going to get there? Arguing the principle that brands operate in societies, not just markets, students of this course will be encouraged to have critical views and to openly participate in the ethics discussions behind examples show-casing how collective entities of all sorts are currently coping/adapting to new context reality and how the innovation challenges of a Post “non-entirely” human era, as well as those derived from our consciousness over the natural limits of our planetary resources, are transforming our way of life, our values scale of expectations and thus our companies and enterprises managerial practices.

The course in all will underpin examples of COLLECTIVENESS in the context of a ultra-highly CONNECTED society that can no longer solve the global challenges of the future, following individual strengths or singled-out efforts; following examples the innovation and knowledge transfer capabilities and responsibilities of in specific sectors/issues such as food and nutrition, architecture and living design, health and genomic sciences, fashion and responsible consumerism and production or travel and tourism and urban and global mobility, among others. The Collectivity Revolution is an account of the new paradigms of management and commerce across businesses and its communities, as a whole. The title of the course responds to a play-on-words between the terms Collective and Connection and the Revolutionary outcomes of its merging forces.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: 51813 | Open
Pre-requisite: There are no specific prerequisites for this course, just a genuine interest in sustainability and being briefly familiarized with the UN Agenda 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.
The course is devoted to delivering the knowledge on the pertinent issues of sustainable development through the prism of the use of circular economy principles. Understanding the concept of a circular economy demands the understanding as to how a circular economy deviates from the current linear system, being able to analyze and develop complex circular systems using a systems-thinking approach, assessing the use of Life Cycle Assessment and Agent Based Modelling. The course also teaches how to formulate improvements for a transition towards a circular design and the students learn how to use and apply complexity aspects and agent-based modelling. The concept of circular economy will be applied through policy considerations, legal aspects, economic and practical implications.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Environmental Studies | Course #: 51793 | Open
Archaeology has been expressing a growing interest in incorporating future-oriented perspectives and the use of the past in planning a better future. Concern for the issues associated with the Anthropocene debate is a clear example. Scientists have argued that the Anthropocene is a useful concept to denote the measurable impact of humanity on the planet. The study of the Anthropocene proposes a radical reassessment of the role of humanity in the world (past, present and future). How, then, does the Anthropocene concept change the archaeological understanding of human relations with the living environment, and with ecology in a broader sense?.

The course involves working on the connections between nature and human beings (socio-ecological dynamics) and the concept of the "entanglement" of societies (as seen through archaeological material), global climate change and environmental change, and our ability to measure and understand these changes.

This course will address the theoretical perspective of the Anthropocene and how archaeology can significantly contribute to this discussion, not only in terms of ideas and arguments, but also in terms arguments of the Anthropocene can be verified and evaluated. In addition, the course will address, across a broad disciplinary range, how archaeology can contribute to finding solutions to some of today’s most pressing problems and to designing more sustainable and resilient livelihoods.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Environmental Studies | Course #: 51814 | Open
Se ofrecerán informaciones y análisis sobre el proceso histórico de toma de conciencia ecologista (el surgimiento de las organizaciones conservacionistas y ecologistas, la publicación de informes internacionales sobre los límites del crecimiento y de libros sobre ecología y ecologismo), las conferencias internacionales sobre el medio ambiente, la creación y el desarrollo de los partidos verdes, las ideas y las propuestas del ecosocialismo y del ecofeminismo, las contradicciones y las propuestas de integración entre el sindicalismo de clase y el ecologismo, las causas y las consecuencias de la crisis ecológica global, de la emergencia climática y de la sexta extinción de las especies, las respuestas institucionales al cambio climático (conferencias de Naciones Unidas, informes del Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, gobiernos y parlamentos de Estados Unidos, China, Unión Europea y España), las respuestas empresariales al cambio climático, el movimiento ecologista actual en el mundo, en Europa y en España, y las propuestas de decrecimiento, transición energética, “Green New Deal” y ética del consumo. También se aportarán argumentos para responder a las siguientes preguntas: ¿Es posible un capitalismo verde? ¿Es necesario y viable un socialismo ecológico?
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Environmental Studies | Course #: 51817 | Open
The course is designed in 3 areas: Open mind, open heart, open will in order to allow the student to explore its personal journey towards sustainability.

. Open mind (Explore) consists on rising awareness about the unprecedented challenges we facing today. At that point of the course, students have created a sense of common language and a common vision about global and systemic challenges.

. Open heart (Experience) is a real appreciative inquiry about its leadership style. At that point of the course, we create a sense of community learning.

. Open will (Expedition) is when we introduce and put in action the leadership style as well as the system thinking. At that point of the course, we clarify the purpose of the Leadership journey and everyone revisit his/her career sweet spot.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: 51816 | Open
This course provides a dynamic, multi-disciplinary introduction to Contemporary Art in Spain. A background on this specified field is not required. For this reason not only the main artistic events will be covered, but also some political, historical and cultural issues that might be relevant. Although this course is manly based on lectures and class debate, four visits to art centers and exhibitions will be also part of the course requirements. These visits will be made during class time and are equivalent to a usual in-class lecture. We will discuss recent classics as well as emerging artists, and we will cover a wide range of artistic practices, from photography to afterpop music, including installation art, performance art and comic art. Although the course offers several relevant clues to understand the historical context and particular conditions in Spain, it is also intended as a more general insight into contemporary artistic strategies and topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: 51828 | Open
This course will navigate the complex and mutating field of gay, lesbian, bisex, trans, intersex and queer studies, exploring its history and developement since its inception. The course explores non-hegemonic identities and gender and sexual diversity from many different perspectives: their criminalization, pathologization or their fights for equality and rights. Social, legal, historical, and cultural implications of sexuality, articulating academic and activist perspectives will provide a framework and a context.

Furthermore, to highlight the importance of understanding these topics as non-homogeneous and in an intersectional way students's contributions will be asked for in order to build up an intercultural dialogue based on their own perspectives and geographies. The course aims to establish a dialogue between different positions within society and cultural production (such as cinema, literature, poetry, theatre, etc.) so as to reflect on the implications of visibility for the community and for the different representations of such dissident sexualities and identities.

The assumption of stability of biological sex and the meaning and goals of gender expression will be subject to inquiry. Theoretical lectures, seminars and debates, critical workshops and field trips will be used to address in a critical manner the importance of (re)thinking our sexualities in a political and non-monolithic way.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: 51832 | Open
This course offers an introduction to critical questions related to gender, sexuality, the body, and diversity in an increasingly globalized world. The course will provide students with theoretical and methodological tools derived from Gender and Feminist Studies so that they become able to analyze a variety of topics from a critical and “engendered” point of view. The topics examined will be diverse, and will include, among others, primate behavior interpretation, the origins of gender inequality, patriarchal violence, beauty canons, assisted reproduction, prostitution, transsexuality, intersexuality, contemporary sexualities, or new family models.

With the objective that students develop a critical point of view in their own creative way, during the course the teaching staff will present the similarities and differences that exist between the main feminist movements in force today, as well as the perspectives from which these movements address the aforementioned themes.
Two fundamental aspects will be transversal to the discussion of all the previous topics :1) the un-critical projection of the logics of the present into the past in order to justify/naturalize both current stereotypes and current issues related to gender, sexuality, the body, and diversity; and, 2) the incorporation of the analysis of historical trajectories and perspectives to understand how gender has shaped present societies and cultures throughout the world. This is neither a history nor an archeology course, but rather a transdisciplinary subject that aims to combine different areas of study to better understand the current stances of different collectives in relation to the aforementioned topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Global Studies | Course #: 51619 | Open
The course will offer a systematic historical look at globalization, generally arguing that relevant changes of globalization should be seen as emerging in phases, that could turn out to be 1500's, 1800's and the late 20th Century. The course tries to move our vision of globalization away from an exclusive focus on essentially contemporary developments and move our vision away from the Western civilization tradition to focus on other major civilizations.
The growing need for historical perspective on international relationships, global economic patterns of contacts and cultural exchanges has fueled the increasing interest, from international organizations, global companies and institutions with global targets, to find and hire professionals who could develop some of the competences that this course provides.
Contact Hours: 45
Even if we’re assuming that we live in a globalized world (Internet, social networks, global tourism, massive migrations, cosmopolitanism, global markets, global brands, global services..) a closer look to how television is dealing with specific contemporary debates such as those about gender, race, class, democracy...etc. show how different are their perspectives.
This course puts the focus on how different public television channels around the world are representing and debating with their audiences such issues using a Media Literacy perspective and a Critical and Ethical approach, connecting them with a primary responsability of public tv: contributing to the education and empowerment of citizens.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Global Studies | Course #: 51826 | Open
European football (soccer) has become a major cultural vehicle in the global world, both in terms of economical impact and social influence. This course focuses on how this sport shapes the social, economical and cultural realms, and tries to interpret the different links between the game itself and the dimensions surrounding it: media coverage, aesthetic value, political targeting, public and corporate policies... In that context, FC Barcelona remains a unique case, studied in business schools as an example of global market branding, while passionately lived by millions of fans all over the world. Moreover, Barcelona city offers a privileged standpoint to better understand football as a growing issue within contemporary culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Healthcare Studies | Course #: TBA3 | Open
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential foundations of psychopharmacology from a neurobiological perspective. It is intended that the student learn the basis of psychoactive drugs, to understand their mechanism of action, distinguish between therapeutic and side effects, know the main drugs that are subject to abuse, know the addictive and neurotoxic potential of some psychoactive drugs, and learn about current drug addiction treatments. To achieve these goals, a neural circuit view will be used, and behavioral alterations in psychopathology and the genetic basis of normal and pathological behavior will be considered. The competences to be achieved include identifying, describing and relating behavioral neurobiology to psychopharmacology, using different information and communication technologies for diverse purposes, working in groups and presenting the main ideas of a topic. The course will address the neurobiological mechanisms and treatment of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety and addiction. To understand the neurobiological substrate of mental processes and behavior, it is necessary to know the components and functioning of the nervous system. The course aims to provide the knowledge needed to understand how the brain works in health and disease. This will include the study of the neuron and its neurochemical physiology. At the end of this course, the student will gain valuable knowledge of psychopharmacology and neuroscience useful for daily life.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Healthcare Studies | Course #: TBA6 | Open
Curiosity combined with our ability of abstraction are the fundamentals of the search for meaning of life, as key features to human nature. Indeed, the so-called existential questions, concerning the essence of what it means to be alive, are present in most cultures around the world. From tribal rituals to religious ceremonies, people have looked for, and sometimes experienced different forms of spiritual awakening, opening the path to more existential questions into philosophical or spiritual journeys.
The world of science is not disconnected from such philosophical dynamics: so often scientific discoveries originated from personal beliefs. In other words, the starting point of research is pretty much a bet on the scientist’s view of nature, which will be later proven true or false. In this course we will treat some philosophical/existential questions starting from the nature of the human brain, integrating mystical traditions and interpreting them from a scientific perspective. The course will assess the metaphysics of the brain on its path to spirituality, particularly focusing on Jewish Kabbalah, an ancient mystical knowledge that can be closely related to mathematical thinking. With the aim of expanding our scope and broadening our thinking from an innovative perspective, the latest achievements in neuroscience, all the way from perception to consciousness will be combined with mystical concepts, namely the 10-dimensional Kabbalistic scheme called the Tree of Life. This novel and challenging approach is meant to help us get a better insight into how our human nature conditions us on our path to spirituality.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: 51600 | Open
Once labeled by Newsweek magazine as the "coolest city in Europe" Barcelona enjoys the reputation of a cosmopolitan city with a great international projection. Like all places, however, it is not without its complexities and contradictions. Behind a glossy and tourist-friendly facade, the city has a complex history.

This course introduces the student to the city of Barcelona by studying its past and analyzing its present. This interdisciplinary course covers subject in history, geography, art, architecture, and urban planning. Materials include images, maps, academic and literary texts, videos, field studies, and documentaries. We will also discuss issues relevant to people living within the city of Barcelona today.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: TBA5 | Open
The course focuses on the creation and evolution of modern constitutional polities in Iberia and Europe, including states (e.g. Spain), unions of states (e.g. the European Union) and sub-state units (e.g. Catalonia). More than an empirical explanation of different cases, the main aim is to analyse basic concepts and ideas that helped to develop current liberal democracies. The complexity and fragility of the equilibrium between these concepts and ideas may offer some clues on how to deal with the multiple criticisms and threats that European liberal-democracy is facing. Each session will predominantly address and discuss a specific concept or idea (or close group of them) including sovereignty, territorial autonomy, federalism, democracy, parliamentarism, constitutionalism, constituent power, separation of powers, rule of law, fundamental rights, European integration, secession and withdrawal. Obviously, these concepts and ideas have strong links among each other and so will the lectures of this course.
Since all these legal and political issues are important, broad, multifaceted, stimulating and controversial, students with distinct backgrounds and different academic interests may enjoy this course, which is not intended to take place behind university doors exclusively but also to include historical walks and institutional visits. As the course explores the origins and evolution of these crucial constitutional notions, the teaching team is composed by a legal historian (Dr Josep Capdeferro), a constitutional law scholar (Dr Hèctor López) and a public lawyer and political theorist (Dr Pau Bossacoma). This is a consolidated team whose members often collaborate with one another.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: TBA7 | Open
This course will focus on the Space Race from the Sputnik (1957) to the Apollo-Soyuz programme (1975), from the destalinization to the détente. Throughout the study of the public sphere, the pop-culture and of the mass media, students will learn the complex dimension of the Space Race and of its centrality in the Cold War dynamics. We will study how the mass media shaped the public imagination in the USA, in Western Europe and in USSR during the Space Race. The course will analyze how the mythologies of the ‘frontier’ both in the USA and in Soviet Union were extended to the interplanetary space. We will study how fears and desires were projected in the Space Race. We will see how each side conceived the other both as an enemy and as a collaborator, how the Space Race was marketed in terms of competition and collaboration at the same time, becoming with the Apollo-Soyuz project the symbol of the déténte. Throughout the reading of magazines, newspapers, as well as the analysis of TV shows, novels and science fiction movies, we will see how the Space Race influenced the daily life in the USA and in USSR, as well as gender, sex and ethnic relations. We will focus on memoirs of astronauts, engineers, politicians and policymakers and of other actors to see how the main characters of the story perceived the history of the Space Race and were perceived in the public sphere. The study of the cultural industry will allow us to unveil certain features of the making of what Dwight Eisenhower defined the industrial-military complex in the two countries.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 51812 | Open
This course centers on the interaction between Neurosciences, Engineering and the Humanities, by posing crucial questions on intelligence, perception and aesthetics. How brains and machines build up knowledge? What is intelligence and “what do we talk about when we talk about artificial intelligence”? We will analyze how sensory systems build up a representation of the world, with particular attention to vision and audition. In parallel, we will explore the minimal requirements of a brain, building on our age-old attempts to build artificial intelligent systems. We will review the history of artificial intelligence and brain science, focusing on the connections that the two fields have had, on and off, over the years. This leads to a more general discussion on the foundations and limits of knowledge and the evolutionary roots of belief. Can we gather reliable knowledge? Are we prone to believe? What is the relationship between genes and environment? Beyond that, how does biology conditions our experience of Art? And further, can computers mimic creativity in Art? The course attempts to frame the above questions into the current scientific knowledge of the brain and the engineering of complex systems.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 51819 | Open
Students will learn the fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence and understand the implication of these techniques in the arts, as well as AI techniques that can be used to make sense of human gesture, musical audio, and other real-time data. The focus will be on learning about algorithms, software tools, and best practices that can be immediately employed in creating new real-time interactive systems in the arts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: 51831 | Open
The increasing popularity of sport has genuinely transformed sport governance. No doubt this situation has had a positive impact in the ethics and integrity of spot governance. But the COVID-19 pandemic has suddenly change the world of sport. The economic importance of sport and its cross-border nature puts sport institutions in a situation in which they must face an uncertain future. This course is aimed at analyzing five key challenges for the future of sport global governance, namely: I) COVID economic impact and tis implications in the legal autonomy of sport, ii) the concept of equality in sport regarding neutral gender, intersex and cyborg athletes, iii) the democratization of sport bodies and strengthening athletes’ voice inside job, iv) the impact of AI and other new technologies and, v) the sustainability of mega sport events.

All of these challenges are interconnected. Sport Government Bodies (SGB) as ICO, FIFA, IAAF, and so on, enjoy a large economic and legal autonomy to manage their business, which is in many cases against the rights of athletes. But have SGB political and legal legitimacy to rule and ask for compliance? It seems that a new legal system of sport laws is emerging from these SGB and the Court of Arbitration of Sport. Is this jurisprudence limiting the rights of the athletes? Is it compulsory for national and supranational legal systems?
On the other hand, the increasing market expanding of Sport make it a great field for experimentation with new technologies, drugs and specially to apply Artificial Intelligence to increase the performance of the athletes. This situation has several ethical implications that need to be carefully analyzed. Finally the sustainability of sport mega events is a crucial point at this time of climatic emergency that challenges the continuity of sport mega-events in the future.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Statistics | Course #: 51792 | Open
Analytics focuses on transforming data into insights by applying advanced analytical methods, based on mathematics, statistics and artificial intelligence models and algorithms to improve the performance of an organization. On this course, key topics and issues in Analytics will be presented and discussed with a focus on their applications in social, healthcare, sustainable and humanitarian organizations.

In the first part of the course, the analytic tools and methodologies will be introduced. In the second part, case studies from humanitarian, social, healthcare and environmental organizations (such as NGO humanitarian organizations, social care organizations, public services, hospitals or primary healthcare institutions) will be presented and discussed. Examples are: home healthcare logistics and scheduling; planning disaster response and preparedness for improved decision-making; locations of primary healthcare centers, or schools; planning humanitarian aid distribution; planning sustainable transportation; etc.
Contact Hours: 45

International Business (ESCI)

3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51655 | Section: 1 | Open
Monday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Wednesday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Accounting
This course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated view of the European market. The course is structured into two sections: the first offers a global view of Europe (historical background, evolution of the E.U., its institutional structure, and its domestic and foreign policies). The second analyzes the European business environment, paying special attention to differences in managerial and consumer behavior in order to understand and identify economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the E.U. that might represent opportunities for business development in the region.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51655 | Section: 2 | Open
Monday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Wednesday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Accounting
This course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated view of the European market. The course is structured into two sections: the first offers a global view of Europe (historical background, evolution of the E.U., its institutional structure, and its domestic and foreign policies). The second analyzes the European business environment, paying special attention to differences in managerial and consumer behavior in order to understand and identify economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the E.U. that might represent opportunities for business development in the region.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51701 | Section: 1 | Open
Monday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Wednesday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Globalization has created new opportunities for businesses worldwide. This course is designed to prepare students to better analyze and understand the challenges and chances that companies face when expanding their activities internationally. Special attention will be placed upon the different tools and analytical skills available to and required for various specialized managerial roles when businesses are competing internationally.

The course is comprised of 3 segments:

The first is designed to offer students insight into the challenges posed by the international environment. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of differences in political economies and risks, as well as cultural and social heterogeneity among different countries. The second will focus on the analysis of global organizational structures and international strategies.
Finally, the third will deal with international management operations, with a particular focus on import and export strategies and financing. It will also examine some of the keys to global marketing and human resource management.
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the dialogue between neurosciences and humanities, thereby breaking the classical gap between CP Snows' "Two Cultures". The intersecting topics range from philosophical and ethical issues, such as free will, the grounds of knowledge, or economic behavior, to questions related to art and culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51701 | Section: 2 | Open
Monday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Wednesday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Globalization has created new opportunities for businesses worldwide. This course is designed to prepare students to better analyze and understand the challenges and chances that companies face when expanding their activities internationally. Special attention will be placed upon the different tools and analytical skills available to and required for various specialized managerial roles when businesses are competing internationally.

The course is comprised of 3 segments:

The first is designed to offer students insight into the challenges posed by the international environment. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of differences in political economies and risks, as well as cultural and social heterogeneity among different countries. The second will focus on the analysis of global organizational structures and international strategies.
Finally, the third will deal with international management operations, with a particular focus on import and export strategies and financing. It will also examine some of the keys to global marketing and human resource management.
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the dialogue between neurosciences and humanities, thereby breaking the classical gap between CP Snows' "Two Cultures". The intersecting topics range from philosophical and ethical issues, such as free will, the grounds of knowledge, or economic behavior, to questions related to art and culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51703 | Open
Monday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Wednesday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Accounting, Financial Management. Not compatible with 40110.
This course aims to provide students with a good understanding of the international financial markets and their impact on financial decisions and management at international firms. The course covers a range of topics related to the international monetary system, the foreign exchange and derivatives markets, the financing of international firms, foreign investment operations, and foreign exchange risk management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51704 | Open
Monday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Wednesday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Business Organization
This course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated view of the European market. The course is structured into two sections:

The first offers a global view of Europe (historical background, evolution of the E.U., its institutional structure, and its domestic and foreign policies).
The second analyzes the European business environment, paying special attention to differences in managerial and consumer behavior in order to understand and identify economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the E.U. that might represent opportunities for business development in the region.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51706 | Open
Tuesday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Thursday 2:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Recommended prerequisite: Introduction to Marketing
Neuro-marketing. Social Responsibility in Marketing. Last trends in giving services through innovation.

To be able to develop the marketing-mix strategy, define the brand extension as well as the communication strategies and distribution alternatives, striving to look towards the future and provide insights for a successful relationship with customers and clients.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51728 | Section: 1 | Open
Monday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Wednesday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Pre-requisite: Corporate finance. Not compatible with 40110.
Financial risks: currency risk exposure, interest rate risk, price volatility risk, among others. Hedging financial risk with varios risk management concepts, tools and techniques held by the derivative products: Futures, Forwards, Options and Swaps.

Discussion on the design and implementation of risk management practices. Realize and understand various state-of-the art risk management theories and practices (such as loss control, loss financing, and internal risk reduction mechanisms) as well as their advancement in the future.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51728 | Section: 2 | Open
Monday 7:10 pm - 9:25 pm
Wednesday 7:10 pm - 9:25 pm
Pre-requisite: Corporate finance. Not compatible with 40110.
Financial risks: currency risk exposure, interest rate risk, price volatility risk, among others. Hedging financial risk with varios risk management concepts, tools and techniques held by the derivative products: Futures, Forwards, Options and Swaps.

Discussion on the design and implementation of risk management practices. Realize and understand various state-of-the art risk management theories and practices (such as loss control, loss financing, and internal risk reduction mechanisms) as well as their advancement in the future.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51745 | Open
Monday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Wednesday 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Business organization
Concepts and tools of intercultural communication and cross cultural management that make sense of a globalizing word: Multiculturalism and inter-culturalism, diversity and super-diversity in the business environment. Culture convergence and cross-cultural connections.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51752 | Section: 1 | Open
Monday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Wednesday 4:50 pm - 7:05 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing. Not compatible with 40204.
Perception, memory, motivation and personality and their marketing applications in the contexts of product awareness, product recall, and product attitude formation. Decision-making models and influence techniques and marketing applications in the contexts of product choice and brand loyalty.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51752 | Section: 2 | Open
Monday 7:10 pm - 9:25 pm
Wednesday 7:10 pm - 9:25 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing. Not compatible with 40204.
Perception, memory, motivation and personality and their marketing applications in the contexts of product awareness, product recall, and product attitude formation. Decision-making models and influence techniques and marketing applications in the contexts of product choice and brand loyalty.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 51837 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Thursday 1:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Distinguish, choose and apply the main assessment methodologies, improvement and environmental communication of products and services. Assess the internalization of sustainability in businesses
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Business | Course #: 80234 | Open
Tuesday 4:45 pm - 7:05 pm
Thursday 4:45 pm - 7:05 pm
Pre-requisite: Recommended Prerequisite: Marketing management
The strategic role of branding. Designing an effective brand strategy. Developing a brand value proposition that engages customers. Brand architecture and dynamics (brand porfolios, brand repositioning brand extensions and cobranding). Building lifestyle and premium brands. Brand ethics and social responsibility.

Building enduring brands in competitive markets and creation of market value. Developing managerial perspective regarding strategic brand management in a global framework
Contact Hours: 45

Global Leadership Certificate
Students can supplement a regular semester of studies with the SAI Global Leadership Certificate (GLC), designed to enrich students’ experiences and to acknowledge their academic and service work by providing an additional credential beyond a university transcript. Students enrolled in the Global Leadership Certificate program broaden their awareness of global issues and deepen their knowledge of the host community’s role in an increasingly interconnected world through exploration of research, engagement in community service and interaction with experts and leaders. Students interested in applying for the GLC should select the program at application. Your Admissions Counselor will help guide you through the process of selecting GLC-approved courses at the time of registration.

Semester students at UPF select from the following concentrations:

  • Barcelona Program for Interdisciplinary Studies (BaPIS): BaPIS brings together students from a variety of majors, nationalities, and backgrounds.  By breaking down the barriers between knowledge areas, BaPIS encourages an interdisciplinary approach. With its hands-on approach and combination of STEM disciplines, Communication, Humanities and Social Sciences, BaPIS provides a unique environment for developing intellectual tools to address today’s most pressing challenges.
  • International Business Program (ESCI): This program is aimed at undergraduate business students who wish to acquire an international perspective and a better understanding of the management practices needed to compete in the global economy. The program offers insight into international business from a multicultural perspective and helps students to improve their professional qualifications. ESCI students select their preferred core courses from UPF’s International Business programs, and may also add electives from the BaPIS program.

Courses & Schedule
UPF Semester courses are generally offered Monday through Thursday. SAI students are free to enroll in any combination of elective courses, but prerequisites must be demonstrated through students’ transcripts. Students wishing to enroll in content courses in Spanish must be heritage speakers or have at least completed three semesters of college level Spanish.

Course Registration
As soon as the UPF semester schedule is confirmed, students are asked to complete a Course Approval form, which is used to specify first-choice and alternate-choice courses. SAI’s Barcelona Admissions Counselor will help guide students through this process. Students choose classes based on a preliminary schedule that is subject to change. The final course days and times are published just ahead of the program start date.

Placement Tests
Students who register for Spanish Language courses and for courses taught in Spanish must complete a placement test upon arrival in Barcelona.


Pre-Departure Calendar
October 1 2022
Application Closes
Applications accepted after closing as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
October 1 2022
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
October 15 2022
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
November 15 2022
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
December 1 2021
Balance of Total Program Fee Due

On-Site Calendar
January 4 2023
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into El Prat Barcelona (BCN) airport. SAI airport pickup is provided between 10:00am and 3:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
January 5 2023
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation is held at the SAI Barcelona office and introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
January 9 2023
Academic Orientation & Spanish Placement Test
UPF orientation provides details on academic policies, and allows students to meet one another and their professors. Students enrolled in Spanish language courses also complete the placement test.
January 9 2023
Classes Begin
March 23 2023
BaPIS Program Final Exams End
March 24 2023
BaPIS Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
March 24 2023
ESCI Program Final Exams End
March 25 2023
ESCI Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $120
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 12 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$11,600
Program Fee: 15 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$12,300
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$1,300
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Shared
Family homestay in a bedroom shared with another student, breakfast and dinner included.
$150
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Private
Family homestay in a private bedroom, breakfast and dinner included.
$675
Optional Visa Processing Fee (if applicable)
Available for some jurisdictions.
$275
International Mailing Supplement
When applicable, students are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$90

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Barcelona
$950 $1,500
Books, Supplies & Course Fees $100 / course $200 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$700 / month $1,000 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $350 / month
Transportation within Barcelona
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is a SAI 360° Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to fostering a welcoming community for all students by providing assistance to diverse needs
  • SAI Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities & trips outside host city
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers all students the Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities, at no extra cost, for participants to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Lunch
Students are welcomed to their new city over a traditional 3 course Spanish lunch to mingle and get to know each other.

Barcelona Bike Tour
This tour is a fun and exciting way to discover Barcelona’s old port, renowned beaches, and picturesque Ciutadella Park. Along the way, students see the sights that make Barcelona so famous and hear the stories behind them.

Modernism Tour
During this tour, students get to know the iconic and symbolic Modernist architecture of Gaudi by discovering the Sagrada Familia and the Casa Battló, among other famous buildings.

Cultural Workshop: Navigating Spanish Culture
Students learn about local habits, traditions, food and language tips to get to know their new home!

Medieval Heritage: Girona and Besalu Day Trip
This exciting day trip takes students to Girona and Besalú, both cities that have been featured in Game of Thrones. Girona has more than 2000 years of history, with its two fortified enclosures: the first built in the 1st century BCE, and the medieval extension of the city walls from the 14th and 15th centuries. Besalú is a small town with a Romanesque bridge and remarkable medieval buildings situated close to Girona. Once an important local capital during the Middle Ages, it is nowadays a hidden treasure.

Visit the Bunkers of Carmel
A visit to one of the most astonishing viewpoints in Barcelona. These anti-aircraft batteries from the Spanish Civil War have become a popular spot amongst locals and visitors.

Montserrat & Organic Wine Cellar Day Trip
Students take a day trip to Montserrat, a spectacularly beautiful Benedictine mountain retreat. Its unusual rock formations and its natural beauty have made it a Catalonian icon. Students take the cable train up the mountain to visit the monastery and wander the mountain paths, with amazing views of the Catalonian countryside. In the afternoon, students have the chance to enjoy the countryside of one of the most well-known Catalan wine regions with a wine tasting and a typical “Esmorzar de pagès”.

Poblenou Visit
This ex-industrial district has transformed into a hub for creativity and technology in recent years. Students visit this fascinating neighborhood that has with its personality outlined by charming smokestacks that are scattered throughout the area. Discover old factories that have been converted into galleries and studios and communication and technology companies that have based their headquarters in the 22@ district. There will also be a stop at the Encants flea market!

Gracia Tour
Gracia is one of the most beautiful neighborhoods of Barcelona. For a long time, it was an independent town just outside Barcelona, and today it still maintains its independence and free spirit. On the tour students discover the many secrets of Gracia, its history, its hidden corners, and many stories and curiosities about it.

Ceramic Workshop
In this course for beginners SAI students have the option of making one or two pieces of a functional nature (cup, plate, pot, etc.) based on simple techniques that have been adapted to a beginner’s level.

Camp Nou Stadium Museum
Almost nobody would guess that the Camp Nou is the most visited museum of Barcelona, but it is! Get a panoramic view of the iconic soccer stadium, while seeing the area dedicated to Leo Messi, the trophy cabinet, and more!

Dalí Day Trip
SAI students visit the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Salvador Dalí’s hometown of Figueres. The Dalí Theatre-Museum opened in 1974 and it houses the single largest and most diverse collection of works by Salvador Dalí. Following the museum, students visit the small and beautiful village of Cadaques, considered the jewel of the Costa Brava. Students enjoy a nice stroll from Dali’s home in Port Lligat, to Cadaques.

Parc de Collserola Hike
Behind Tibidabo’s iconic outline, there lies a wealth of woodland and fields including a protected park where a wide variety of Mediterranean flora and fauna brings us into contact with nature just 15 minutes away from the bustling city. This is Barcelona’s great green “lung”. Students enjoy a hike in this beautiful protected land.

Sitges Beach Day
Students visit the town of Sitges, which is a paradise of sun, sea and mild temperatures year-round, and a venue for international film and music festivals. Beautiful views and long beaches make Sitges a wonderful day trip.

Spanish Cooking Lesson
Students take a cooking lesson designed to teach typical Spanish (mostly Catalan) dishes that are easy to make again independently. Dishes are prepared according to the season and include appetizer, main course and dessert.

Olympic Barcelona
The incredible transformation of Barcelona took place in the lead-up to 1992 Olympic Games. Students visit the two most important sites for the Barcelona Games starting with Montjüic Hill, where the Olympic Stadium is located. Later, students visit the Olympic Museum, which puts Barcelona’s Olympic history into context.

Farewell Dinner
Students celebrate the end of a successful time abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Spanish meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing configurations are designated as female, male, and in some locations, gender-inclusive. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
SAI homestay families are thoroughly screened and are accustomed to welcoming visiting students into their homes. Homestays provide a shared (with another study abroad student) or private bedroom in the family home with basic furnishings. Daily breakfast and dinner are included, as is weekly laundry. Mostly Spanish is spoken in the home, granting students an excellent opportunity to practice their language skills. Please note that some homestays may be outside of the city center.

Passports
Passports should be valid for at least 4 months after planned return from Spain.

Student Visas
In accordance with Spanish law US students studying in Spain for 91 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Those with Spanish/EU citizenship are exempted. Because the Spring 2023 term at UPF runs for fewer than 91 days, students attending this program are not required to obtain a visa. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for details on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.