Florence University of the Arts
Fall 11 Week Semester Elective 2022
9 / 12 credits

Immerse yourself in Tuscan life!  SAI offers students the option of enrolling in an 11 week semester program at FUA, in which students earn a total of 9 - 12 semester credits. In addition to typical liberal arts courses, FUA includes such courses as Travel Writing, Pairing Food and Wine, Fashion Design, and Science of Happiness. Students in this program have opportunities to pair academic coursework with internships, the SAI Global Leadership Certificate, and unique experiential learning courses for hands-on experience. SAI also offers a longer 15 week semester program at FUA.


Application: now open
Closes: July 1, 2022
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Transcript
Passport scan (photo & signature page)
USF student conduct form
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Complete internships for credit.
  • Enroll in unique Experiential Learning courses.
  • Spend 11 weeks in Florence – No student visa required!

Program Dates
September 27, 2022 – December 15, 2022
dates may differ as a result of add-ons


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above.

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Horticulture
Hospitality
Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Journalism, Communication, and Publishing
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sciences and Mathematics
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFIB320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Corporate Finance or equivalent.
This course will focus on international financial institutions and international banking activities. Topics include: credit and market risk management, country risk assessment, bank exposure to liquidity, international debt crises and regulations, VAR analysis, RaRoc, and international rules for bank capital. Case studies are used frequently as a teaching tool to present real life banking experiences in the classroom.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREM305 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of
new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREM310 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shits or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUERFU450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the world of non-profit fundraising. Fundraising strategies are employed by charitable and non-profit institutions to raise financial support for projects and initiatives, and represent an essential feature of non-profit organization and operations. Students will become familiarized with philanthropic activity, donor relations, and strategies. Through the sponsoring organization, students will gain a meaningful experience in fundraising practices in areas such as development, promotion, and communications. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality Management | Course #: BUMAOB470 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Human Resources Management or equivalent
The aim of this course is to provide an overview of main theoretical concepts of organizational behavior (OB) and their application in contemporary hospitality organizations. The course covers various topics in OB, which are generally grouped into the individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis. The course balances conceptual knowledge with practical application. Lectures will provide a broad overview of the course topic and explain key concepts to be used in understanding phenomena occurring in the business world. Relevant case studies will be discussed in class in order to develop skills in applying knowledge to practical situations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAIM310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is geared towards students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills and strategy will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. The class will focus on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures form an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAMA450 | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be able to explore the environment of management practices through exposure to an established business in Florence. The position will feature the development of a tailored project that will provide the student with the opportunity to contribute to the organization through the student's perspective. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM305 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM310 | Open
The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of entrepreneurial companies that are starting out, therefore those with lower budgets and little or no brand development. Students will study segmentation, positioning, marketing methods for new ventures, finding competitive strategies in limited resource environments, and implementing strategies aimed to launch successful enterprises.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKIM280 | Open
This course is designed for non-business majors and introduces students to the role of marketing within a business. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, readings and simulations, students will address analytical marketing concepts and techniques developed from economics, psychology, statistics, and finance in order to plan and develop products and services to satisfy the needs of target customers. Topics include product planning, pricing, promotion, advertising, distribution policies, targeting, and market research techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKIT320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent
This course further develops the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures and identifying specific marketing techniques and the modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. Topics include global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKMK450 | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course is designed for students who are looking to enhance their experience and knowledge of marketing strategies and techniques in an international context. The internship will expose students to a business environment where interns will contribute to the organization according to their skill and competency background. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKWM325 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing
Recent years have seen the evolution and revolution in business communication. The birth of the web was the inspiration that led to a different way of relating between companies and customers. Approaches led to a constant customer participation in the creation and development of the business image. Web marketing is based on techniques and principles applicable to all sectors and also suitable for small and medium-sized enterprises up to now often cut off from mass media because of the enormous budget required. But the web is not just sites, in recent years social networks have pointed the way towards a clear undisputed sway. Communication on social networks isn't only about purchasing advertising as in traditional media or even on most websites. The social is the most striking feature of what is called Web 2.0: the network of conversations; and the conversations don't occur only among customers, but must exist between the company and customers to stimulate the most powerful communication tool: word of mouth. A company that does not speak with customers is bound to be forgotten.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREIH320 | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge on the role of urban policy and planning in relation to the housing market in a global context. Students will become familiar with the implications for policy and practice and will learn how to develop regional and local housing strategies. This course includes references to international cases from the United Kingdom, the United States, Ireland, Hong Kong, Australia, and other European countries. Student will gain knowledge of the impact that the emerging sharing economies have on urban development, as well as learning about the process of buying an Italian property as a secondary home.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BURERE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this placement is to expose students to the principles of real estate management with an emphasis on property management. Students will be familiarized with planning and organizing all the relevant activities and operations of a real estate business in the on-campus bed & breakfast, Dimora. This experiential learning program focuses on front desk operations including reservation management, welcoming guests and basics of customer care. Students will learn how to independently run a hospitality business including property maintenance and quality control management. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code.
Contact Hours: 150

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP210 | Open
Pre-requisite: A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.
The course is based on a series of theoretical lectures on the
technical, cultural, visual, and historic aspects of fashion photography. Fashion photography history will be analyzed from the beginning of the 20th century through contemporary works, following the continuously changing fashion styles and trends of today. This introductory course will concentrate on the technical and logistical aspects of fashion photography using natural light and light basic metering. This course combines introduction to photographic techniques with an emphasis on fashion photography. The first six lessons students will be guided through basic (introductory) camera usage. The later part of this course students will be challenged on basic fashion photography assignments.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFY350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to deepen their skills in the area of fashion photography. Students create individual and collaborative digital projects, which are then edited and processed. Fashion-themed approaches may include elements such as ad campaigns, look books, design sets and studio photography, and interaction with fashion-based clients and collaborators associated with FLY Fashion Loves You, the creative learning lab and retail store of FAST, the fashion and accessories studies and technology division of FUA-AUF. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based and production/editing activities for remote placements. 
This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. 
 Main tasks: Photo assignments, conceptual and theme research, location scouting research, digital photo archiving management, image post-production, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code, not applicable to remote option. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable. Remote option students will need their own access to Adobe software.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHLA300 | Closed
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.
The city of Florence, with its backdrop of Medieval and Renaissance buildings coupled with the varied beauty of the Tuscan countryside, will offer students a stimulating range of opportunities for landscape and architectural photography. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and the exploration of several camera format techniques, lenses as well as printing. By studying influential photographers com-positional and artistic issues of parallax, distortion and perspective will be addressed and executed through assignments. A personal vision will be nurtured and guided by the instructor for the final project in a series of
landscape/naturalistic/architectural visual context. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This is a specialized course which requires at least one specialized lens. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPH450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
Through the photography internship course, students will collaborate with professional photographers and photo labs. Students will learn to develop research and preparation for photo shoots, become familiarized with diverse shooting locations, and assist with photo assignments. Additional topics may include image processing and printing, assisting with photo shoot logistics, handling photographic equipment, and archiving. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHSP220 | Closed
This course considers how street photographers strive to capture the life and culture of city streets, searching for what Henri Cartier Bresson termed the Decisive Moment when it comes to street photography. A skilled street photographer is able to anticipate action, interaction and that microsecond when the ordinary street scene becomes an extraordinary photograph. Methods that encourages interaction between the photographer and subject are stressed. Techniques mastered by Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Costas as well as others will be examined. Students will immerse themselves in the whirl of street life in Florence as they move towards an understanding of what it takes to successfully photograph in the street.
NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIVCAD330 | Open
Pre-requisite: Visual Communication Design Fundamentals Studio I, Introduction to Digital Graphic Illustration.
This course focuses on the creation of projects in advertising campaigns from the initial research and creative strategy to the final execution of a comprehensive commercial project. Students will be taken through the principles of art direction and layout as well as the marketing aspects of an advertising campaign, working with a copywriter, learning techniques for idea visualization, and structuring the campaign to the requirements of the client.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, video shooting skills, editing software experience.
This internship course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIITWD200 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, web back office experience.
This lab-based course trains students to develop effective graphic design interfaces for the web. Students will be introduced to software and technical information for maps, hot spots, links, and site management. Additional topics include search engines, on-line services, and web development.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCCG150 | Section: II | Closed
This computer graphics introductory course will cover the following topics: computer generated art, adobe Photoshop, photo adjustments and effects, computer drawing, morphing and modeling in Photoshop and editing. Students will compile a personal portfolio, presenting it to the class at the end of the semester or session.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF190 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: A basic knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, or other similar software is highly recommended.
This course introduces the student to the principles and basic elements of graphic design. Through a series of assignments and exercises, students will learn and practice hand, eye and problem-solving skills. Topics include: shape, basic color theory, framing, shape and color layout, formats, creative typography, logo creation, symbols and trademarks. the course focuses mainly on manual (non-computer) techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF250 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Visual Communication I or equivalent. Knowledge of Adobe Suite is required.
The aim of this course is to provide the students with a strong base for designing effective visual communications that are able to inform and motivate the viewer. The main purpose of this course is for students to develop a research and experimentation approach in order to understand the diverse aspects of visual design. Through a series of exercises, students will be able to master basic design principles, conceptual problem-solving methods, and critical thinking skills. This will allow them to evaluate the effectiveness of their work. Topics also include content in typography, layout, logo design, and poster design. This course includes Fab Lab studio hours and experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: Visual Communication I or equivalent. Knowledge of Adobe Suite is required.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCMM340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics, Digital Graphic Illustration.
Multimedia studio is a studio course that focuses on the experience of producing complete multimedia works in a project-based environment. lectures and meetings augment this studio course. Individual creativity is stressed as well as collaboration in the creation of works through individual and group projects. assignments vary in scale, and focus on appropriate planning, design and execution, as well as acquisition and creation of content in various media. Previously introduced concepts and technology are re-explored with an emphasis on integration and effectiveness in the communication of the concept of the piece.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCVC450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work layout and illustration software experience.
Through the visual communication internship course, students will apply visual and aesthetic inspiration and strategies to creative projects. Students will assist the visual communication staff of the placement organization (i.e. marketing and graphic design teams for companies or freelancers) to develop the visual component of communications-based projects. Tasks may include assisting with items and tasks related to graphic design, photography and video assignments, and websites in formats such as e-newsletters, communication strategies and proposals, flyers, presentations, logos, and brochures. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCWD200 | Open
This lab-based course trains students to develop effective graphic design interfaces for the Web. Students will be introduced to new software and technical information for maps, hot spots, links and site management. Additional topics include: search engines, on-line services and Web development.
Contact Hours: 45

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFW315 | Open
Pre-requisite:
In this course students are introduced to the advanced level of design and production of footwear. This is a fashion design area in which Italy is a market leader and students will analyze the latest styles, leathers, and components in terms of functionality and design. They will continue to develop pattern-making skills by designing and making prototypes of footwear and related accessories.

(90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours)

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADHC330 | Open
In this course students learn the basic skills in the design and the production of handbags. the use of pattern making machines and equipments will be learned, together with the construction techniques as well as the analysis of various styles in handbag design. In addition students will translate their own projects into finished products.

(90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 Studio hours)
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFP210 | Open
Pre-requisite: Basic photography experience and knowledge will be helpful. A digital camera of at least 5.0 mega pixels with an optical zoom lens 3X or more is required. Course Information: Days M, T, W, Th. Times TBA
The course is based on a series of theoretical lectures about the technical, cultural, visual and historical aspects of fashion photography. Fashion photography history will be analyzed from the beginning of the 20th century through contemporary work, following the continuously changing fashion styles and trends. The course will concentrate on technical aspects of fashion photography from location, and portable and studio units, to all aspects of lighting, including natural, artificial, existing light, flash units, and light metering. Students will be guided through up-to-date digital software and technologies into the advertising world. attention to the offset printing technical aspects like color separation, offset film transferring and offset printing will be also given.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCPF280 | Open
This course affords students the possibility to go behind the scenes in exploring the art and business of Italian fashion design. Lectures by industry professionals will be complemented by backstage visits to design studios and possible attendance at seasonal fashion shows.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCWF310 | Open
This course introduces writing techniques in the fashion industry. Topics bridge the gap between core writing classes and higher-level fashion courses concentrating on merchandising and promotion by presenting writing strategies intended for the different writing styles required in the industry. Students will learn the methods of effective writing for fashion reports and forecasts, fashion show scripts, public relations, catalog, direct mail, trade and consumer magazines, and online channels. Case studies illustrate examples of effective and ineffective writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFDIC200 | Closed
This course analyzes fashion-based image consultancy for individual clients as a profession of growing importance in both the fashion and tourism industries. Key course topics include the resources necessary to build a career in consultancy, portfolio building, self-marketing, and client consultation. The course also provides important contextual information related to the dynamics of the fashion industry. Field visits and activities are significant components of the coursework, allowing students to not only familiarize themselves with real working environments but also interact with professionals in order to build competency in networking with future intermediaries and clients.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDDR340 | Open
In this course students learn the clothing construction using the draping techniques. Custom patterns of various designs will be draped. Pattern making by draping of custom patterns in muslin on dress forms or live models are made for any garment and some are cut in intended fabric and constructed. Design of personal dress form will be demonstrated. This class provides education for students entering the fashion industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFD230 | Section: III | Open
This course is an introduction to creative design development and
fashion design skills. topics include: design processes of trend research, storyboard compiling, color story, fabric selection, draping design concepts, design innovation and the 2-D to 3-D development of creative ideas. There will be assigned projects in all of these areas. Students will also be introduced to the basics of fashion illustration. Students prepare for their fourth-semester design collections by exploring the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge of key fashion categories, markets, and price points.



Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDKW200 | Closed
Knitwear design is a longstanding tradition that is is emerging again as an important professional discipline in the fashion industry. In this course, students familiarize themselves with the world knitwear techniques and are introduced to flat bed knitting machines, as well as technical instruments and methods of knitting. Through a series of exercises, students will be able to read and translate pattern schemes, develop ideas into patterns, make samples, and be able to construct a basic machine-knitted garment. Additionally, students will analyze fashion trends in knitwear and learn technical aspects of different yarn types, materials, structure in order to explore tradition and innovation while strengthening an experimental attitude.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM300 | Open
Through this course, students explore and apply various forecast research methods in preparation for developing, planning, purchasing, or merchandising apparel lines and collections. Using the case studies, market and trend research is evaluated to identify opportunities for growth and profitability in a fashion business. By applying consumer, aesthetic and quantitative information, students develop value-added apparel/textile strategies for products and product lines with merchandising campaigns for diverse targets. The outcome of the course will focus on understanding the relationship of forecasting and product line development. Students will be exposed to analytical techniques to acquire quantitative elements through marketing theories that explain fashion dynamics that occur in apparel and retail.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMRO350 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMRO355 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Ceramics | Course #: FACECE200 | Closed
In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. In the first part of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. In the second part of the course, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing. Slide lectures will give students essential information on the nature of clay and glazes. the history of Mediterranean ceramics will be covered during in-class lectures. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Intermediate Painting
This is a rigorous course which allows advanced students to work on individual projects, developing their strengths, and working on areas of weakness. Student will emerge from the course not only having developed a personal language but also having attained a high level of technical competence in traditional methods and materials. Students will also have considerable practice time in non-traditional techniques and methods. challenging individual critiques are an important component of this course and out-of-town field trips, including the Museum of contemporary art in Prato, are included.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFD120 | Open
Working from still life, the natural and urban surroundings of the city of Florence and figure models, the student will learn the basic techniques of drawing, perspective, proportion, and composition. Students will explore the different media of drawing: pencil, charcoal, pen and ink. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFP120 | Closed
This course teaches beginning students the fundamental principles and techniques of painting, focusing on oil painting with concentration on human figures and still-life. Students will learn the build-up of form, tone and color on a two-dimensional surface. Practical demonstrations are supplemented by slide lectures and visits to Florentine museums to view oil paintings first hand. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 90

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this placement, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBT320 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Baking techniques introduces the functions of baking ingredients (such as yeast, flour, and shortening), mixing methods for dough's, fermentation techniques, heat transfer methods. Focus on basic elements such as pastry dough, sponge cake, pachoux, puff pastry, plunder, danesi, croissant, egg/butter based basic creams, production and conservation of fruit conserves and meringues. In this course, students taste and test the products they create as well as complete a research assignment.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPP490 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course explores stimulating applications of both classic and contemporary pastry techniques to pastry shop and a la carte restaurant production. The program focuses on three main topics: the use of freezing temperatures through a survey of the possible applications in which cold temperatures and the balance of ingredients play a fundamental role; handling fresh and seasonal fruits in pastry production; the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create products with unexpectedly smooth textures, a wide variety of gels and contemporary mousses, and pastry applications of molecular gastronomy. Through this experience students will have the possibility to understand the role of specific ingredients in the production of ices in order to serve frozen desserts with a perfect balance between texture and temperature. The course will disclose all the secrets of pastry arts classics like semifreddo, bomba gelato, parfait and bon bons. Special emphasis will be placed on the uses of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. The course offers a full-immersion in the pastry lab production with an important focus on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow pastry chefs to develop their creativity in order to reach new unexpected results. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPT470 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
This course is the advanced phase of Baking Technique courses. Students will experience the application of previously learned foundations to a variety of pastry products such as pie doughs, baked custards, and advanced spongecake recipes. The course introduces a wide range of methods that will be combined for the creation of laminated doughs, souffles, Bavarian mousses, and pate a bombe mousses. Students will learn how to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACA450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, students of the culinary arts internship course are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Interns must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on the weekend and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAIG540 | Open
Pre-requisite: Only for Master students- Advanced

An introduction to the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the culinary, baking, and pastry professions in Italy; traditions and the way these traditions translate into the professional environment of the food service industry today. Topics include the contemporary challenges facing food professionals in the twenty-first century and etiquette as a historical, social, and professional discipline. Students will be expected to complete several written assignments.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC490 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The course is divided into three phases and explores stimulating applications of contemporary cuisine. Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Phase 1, Temperature Application: This phase explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. Phase 2, Gels and Thickening Agents: This phase examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested. Phase 3, Gases and Air-Based Preparations: This phase focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). Prerequisites: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCATF440 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food I or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts Majors.
This course continues to explore the tradition of Italian food through representative recipes. Emphasis will be given to more elaborate dishes, including the cleaning and preparation of shellfish, fresh pasta, food combination's, feast foods and banquets.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAVC420 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The last 40 years of food service have been characterized by a slow yet constant development of nutritional awareness and a more informed approach to food. The aim of the course is not only to offer students techniques for a healthier approach to cooking: this course will focus on cooking techniques that can be applied in order to reduce fat consumption and at same time become the emblems of contemporary cuisine. Flavor-extraction methods, flavoring methods, pressure cooking and sous vide cooking, marinades and brines and the use of alternative fats are nowadays the base of contemporary Chefs creations: students will learn how these techniques can be used to develop a fine dining cuisine that can be healthier yet not necessarily health-fanatic. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAWC510 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary arts majors only.
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside the mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important geographic macro areas. This course allows students to examine the influence of geography and climate on the people, the features of the land, the production of agriculture, the available natural resources, and the main industries in many different areas. Special emphasis will be put on the relationship of attitudes and practices of food preferences and on how foods of a country show a relationship to the social and cultural development of an area. Students will experience food preparation from several cuisines based on the customs and heritage of these cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course, whose aim is to show how the environment, as well as the external cultural influences, is responsible for the characterization of local cuisines. Student will also adapt to various deviations in cooking strategies, develop an understanding of food sources and the availability of these ingredients. During the course students will benefit from practical application of international cooking in a collaborative kitchen environment. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Culinary Arts majors only.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNFW380 | Closed
Wellness is the search for enhanced quality of life, personal and potential growth, through the choice of positive lifestyle behaviors and attitudes. Health can be improved on a daily basis by taking responsibility for our own well being.
This course will teach students how our state of wellness is deeply influenced by a variety of factors including nutrition, physical activity, stress-coping methods, good relationships, and career success. Emphasis will be placed on the benefits of a constant and planned physical activity and on the understanding how each of these benefits is important to long-term health.
The course provides students with the basic knowledge of primary (cardiorespiratory ability, muscular ability, flexibility, and body composition) and secondary (balance, coordination, agility, reaction time, speed, power, mental capability) components of fitness as well as the basics of anatomy. The course will teach students how to combine a targeted nutrition and physical activity for the pursue of good health as well as develop physical skills that also enhance the psychological and emotional well being. Emphasis will be placed on the differences between health-related fitness and skill-related fitness. 
The course includes physical activity sessions focused on general physical wellness.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNHN150 | Closed
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNIN200 | Section: IV | Open
The continuous growth of nutritional awareness worldwide has brought nutrition to be one of the fundamental subjects in constant evolution during the last decades. This course provides students with basic nutrition concepts and focuses on the overview of the requirements and functions of protein, carbohydrates, lipids and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. Emphasis will be placed on the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle and the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases and the maintenance of a good health status thanks to a balanced food consumption.
The course offers an overview of food policies, food education and an analysis of nowadays eating habits. Students will also learn the guidelines for the balancing of a vegetarian diet and understand how to read a food pyramid.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNTF480 | Section: II | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. The course is designed to expose students to the theory and practice of sensory evaluation techniques and their application to the composition of dishes. Students gain knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of taste, smell and other senses and experience using these senses as analytical tools to assess food products. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our senses as they get in touch with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami taste really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order to give the students the instruments needed to deal with flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding before being appreciated. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Culinary Arts majors only.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFC240 | Closed
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italy-culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCTW300 | Closed
The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCTW304 | Closed
The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FWWCPF335 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The capacity to offer the best wine as a combination for chosen dishes is a very important task. The course includes an analysis of the "combination technique" used today by the Italian association of Sommeliers, sensory and quality evaluations, practical workshops on the most successful matches as well as the creation of new flavor combinations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FWWCTW262 | Closed
The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of Tuscan wine typologies focusing particularly on a presentation of the most important wine growing areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be offered and a selection of Tuscan wines will be studied in terms of their characteristics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWA350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Wine appreciation I or equivalent.
This course has been designed to provide students with an advanced working knowledge of wine appreciation. Emphasis is placed on studying the most important Italian grape varieties through out the Italian territory and to learn how to assess and to evaluate the wine typologies deriving from different grapes and soils. Particular importance is given to comparative wine tasting, focusing on the different characteristics of wines coming from different regions. The course gives a complete overview of the most important Italian wine areas.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWF380 | Closed
This course presents, explains and analyzes the role of France as a reference model in the wine world. Course topics cover the historical and cultural origins of winemaking in France, the main native grape varieties as well as the major French wine production areas: Champagne, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Alsace, Loire Valley, Provence and more, with detailed studies on wine characteristics according to the place of production. Students will be guided, also through wine tastings, throughout the french territory to gain an in-depth understanding the concepts of Terroir, Cru and the influence of France on international viticulture and wine styles.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWS350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management special project will be acquire and practice skills related to managing the wine and beverage service at GANZO, the school restaurant and creative learning lab of Apicius International School of Hospitality. Under the leadership and supervision of wine service professionals, students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a restaurant and/or wineries. The aim of the special project is to increase knowledge of wine service, presentation methods, restaurant procedures, wine expertise, and pairing in the hospitality industry. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWW360 | Closed
This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the Old World as France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Hungary, Greece, Slovenia and of course Italy. Students will be guided across Europe to discover the principal wine areas and native grape varieties, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage and winemaking tradition that belong to each country. Course topics include the different appellation systems, soil characteristics, and basics of winemaking process. The course also offers an introduction to wine tasting in order to better understand the original features of the wines from each country.
Contact Hours: 45

Global Studies

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI202 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSAY190 | Closed
This course provides students with an introduction to the art of yoga and meditation to gain an understanding of the philosophical and spiritual contexts that the discipline is rooted in. The course investigation begins with the notion of awareness, and the acquisition of the term through an overview of the principal asanas and their correct practice. The spiritual aspects of yoga are experienced in the form of various meditation techniques from different philosophies as well as the study of pranayama breathing exercises. Topics also include an examination of yoga props as well as dietary and nutritional guidelines, studied through the lens of yoga philosophy gleaned from sacred texts. The course will cover yoga traditions from ancient times to more contemporary interpretations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSER310 | Open
This course is a survey of the different religions and philosophical systems of India, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia, including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism (Theravada, Mahayana, Vajrayana), Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes and concepts such as wisdom, virtue, liberation, enlightenment, yogic discipline, meditation, guru devotion, and ethical behaviour. Excerpts from important texts of covered traditions will be analyzed including The Upanishads, The Bhagavad Gita, the Tao Te Ching, The Dhammapada, and The Confucian Canon. The teachings and writings of influential contemporary spiritual leaders will also be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSHN150 | Closed
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSHW210 | Open
The course focuses on individual skills to succeed in social and personal
life: it provides an introduction to the science of happiness, integrating
findings from positive psychology, behavioral genetics, neurosciences
and behavioral economics. The course also offers a set of tools and
techniques to transform problems into learning and to develop and
apply strategies and skills that promote an all-round progress in a
person's psychological, physical and social life.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSMP270 | Open

Work life requires a high degree of mental clarity and focus. Without
effective tools to deal with that pressure, the result is often an emotional,
mental and physiological imbalance, at work as well as at home.
However, it is possible to live up to our daily challenges, and do so with
clarity, kindness and happiness. mindfulness training is an active
observation and training of the neural networks of our brain. the course
aims at offering students the possibility to achieve previously
inconceivable levels of concentration to unlock the power of a focused
mind.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGSR350 | Closed
Beginning with an examination of the "how to" advice manuals common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, to conception and childbirth, and an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy may have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Discussions will take cue from Renaissance art in which erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Peace Studies | Course #: GSPSHR280 | Open
Only in 20th century the international community has progressively
elaborated rules and procedures to state that certain behaviors are
crimes and to make possible the punishment of those committing these acts. The course will provide an introduction to the birth, evolution and contemporary challenges of human rights, humanitarian law and the international systems to maintain peace or restore justice. It aims at offering an overview of the history of Human Rights from their appearance on international scene to contemporary debates; it will analyze the process of definition of crimes against Humanity, crimes against Peace, War crimes and genocide and the mechanisms to protect Humanitarian law: from the emergency logic of Newberg trial after World War II to the institutionalization of International Criminal Justice and the various typologies of humanitarian interventions: Peacekeeping, Peace-making, Peace-enforcing.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Peace Studies | Course #: GSPSRC270 | Open
Coming soon!
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSFW280 | Open
This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces both visible and invisible the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSSF300 | Closed
The development of the city of Florence and that of the Church are inextricably linked with one another; Christian, and more specifically, Catholic faith provided a framework for one's life, informed the development of social institutions and governing bodies, and inspired the development and flourishing of art and architecture during the period that would come to be known as the Renaissance. In short, this faith touched every aspect of life in the Florence of centuries past, and its present is still seen, felt, and experienced when moving through the dense urban fabric of the city. This course will also investigate the ways in which religious faith permeated numerous aspects of Florentine society and daily life, from the monasteries and convents spread throughout the city, to its charitable institutions and hospitals, to the care for the souls of the condemned, and, more joyfully, to celebratory traditions that survive to the present day. Themed walks will offer an opportunity to explore these themes through engaging with works of sacred art and architecture, as well as sites and routes of religious significance. Works and structures will be contextualized within the historic period in which they were produced, allowing students to understand how and why they were executed, as well as to explore the significance they would have held for their original viewers and to discuss what they mean to beholders today. The analysis of these spaces, places, and works will highlight additional layers of meaning and interpretation: life, death, violence, popular culture, and social change, among others. Open to students from all backgrounds and academic concentrations, this course will allow participants to discover the city of Florence through a unique lens while simultaneously encouraging them to learn about Italian historical epochs and the cultural diversity of its traditions. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSSP220 | Closed
This course considers how street photographers strive to capture the life and culture of city streets, searching for what Henri Cartier-Bresson termed the "Decisive Moment." When it comes to street photography, A skilled street photographer is able to anticipate action, interaction and that microsecond when the ordinary street scene becomes an extraordinary photograph. Methods that encourages interaction between the photographer and subject are stressed. Techniques mastered by Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Costas as well as others will be examined. Students will immerse themselves in the whirl of street life in Florence as they move towards an understand of what it takes to successfully photograph in the street. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.
Contact Hours: 45

Horticulture

3.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HCGHHT350 | Open
Coming soon!
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HCGHTW300 | Closed
The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HCGHTW304 | Closed
The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience.
Contact Hours: 60

Hospitality

3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTCE380 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The rapidly growing industry of corporate event production encompasses a vast collection of event types. Corporate events require individuals to be professionally trained and capable to navigate through the process of designing a successful event. The aim of this course is to provide students with the strategies and approaches to developing successful corporate meetings and conferences. Prerequisites: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTCM360 | Closed
Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and la Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been created and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropoli and developing destinations will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in front of the house hospitality operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the guidance of the Ganzo management, students will gain firsthand practice of customer relations and satisfaction, service, food and beverage operations, collaborative and interpersonal communication between FOH and BOH, and above all practice hospitality skills in an international context. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for people whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional Human Resources. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIE200 | Section: III | Open
The course will provide students with a solid grounding of coordination of events and entertainment. The class will focus on the historical evolution, organizational standards and career paths in the field of event management. The lessons will also address theory elements concerning the foundations of strategic planning, financial management, human resources management and event sponsorship. Students will be involved in hands-on projects developed by the schools event manager in order to experience directly many tasks related to the planning and carrying out of events.
This class features a project at Ganzo for Wednesday AperiGanzo. Students will be involved in Wednesday evening shifts as a part of class.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIH300 | Section: II | Open

Provides a fundamental overview of the hospitality industry and its main segments: hotel, restaurant, management services, and clubs. The operational sectors of the industry as well as managerial components and skills will be explored. All of the following topics will be examined: development of tourism; demand for travel, examination of food and beverages industry, associations and organizations related to hospitality as a sub-segment of the tourism industry. Career opportunities in the
hospitality industry will be discussed and students will be encouraged to develop their own career plan.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIM450 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Hospitality or equivalent.
This course will consider how food and wine tourism is implemented in Italy. The regional aspect of the country, its rich cultural variety, and how the tourism revolving its cuisine and wine are interpreted in sustainable forms will be analyzed. Students will explore the unique gastronomy, products, and producers of specific Italian regions in order to understand the role of territories and local cultures in Italian food and wine tourism. The practices, organization, management, and implementation of these forms of tourism will be studied along with territorial and cultural aspects to discover how gastronomic tourism expresses the soul of a place and can generate new or renewed interest in geographic areas of Italy
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTOB470 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Human Resources Management or equivalent
The course is designed to assist students in making sound decisions in the hospitality industry by heightening their sensibility to the organizational parameters that influence their decisions. Furthermore students will analyze computer systems and their applications within the hotel industry. All computer applications are examined, from reservations to the back office through a series of assignments and projects.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO350 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO355 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTSE411 | Open
Pre-requisite: C1 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies in the special event industry. The aforementioned areas will be employed through the application of hospitality management and proper procedures and strategies related to event management. Students will learn how to identify event trends and client preferences in Italy. Topics will include booking, entertainment, event programming and coordination, themes, and sponsorships. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PSELWC480 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts majors only. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside of the Mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important cultural macro areas. Students will experience food preparation based on the customs and heritage of diverse cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course. The aim is to show how the environment and external cultural influences have a strong impact on local cuisines. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHTSE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this special project course is to expose students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies. The aforementioned strategies will be employed from the perspective of hospitality management and the application of program techniques in special event management. Topics will include booking, event programming and coordination, themes, program partnerships, and event promotion. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBCC532 | Open
Pre-requisite: Hospitality Accounting, Restaurant Management or equivalent. Unofficial Transcript submission required.
Course develops skills in scheduling and controlling costs in managed projects that present the challenges of time, human resources, materials, budget, project specifications, and deadlines. The concept of financial planning for businesses and organizations, including a special emphasis on hospitality structures, asks students to consider the compilation of budgets, identifying/forecasting potential problems to avoid profit loss, flexible vs. static budgets to control costs, and types of cost control analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBCS470 | Closed
This course will enable candidates to gain a deep knowledge and
qualification relating directly to the catering environment. the course
will enhance their personal growth and development, enabling them to
undertake their role with greater confidence. all organizational, logistic
and marketing aspects of the catering industry will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBRM350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Resume indicating at least one previous restaurant experience. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course will focus on the basic understanding of restaurant management, including service management and customer relations, menu planning, and wine list development under the supervision of wine experts. Students will observe and analyze the main operational areas of the restaurant such as food safety and sanitation, guest services, operational responsibilities, and staff communication. Moreover, students will learn how to maintain daily records of customers, sales and costs, as well as produce monthly records. Students will assist the manager in setting service standards and creating a platform for all restaurant operations in accordance with restaurant needs. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. .
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMHM350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this placement is to expose students to the principles of spa management with an emphasis on daily spa operations. Students will gain first-hand experience through analytical observation and participation in the management of the on-campus spa, Sorgiva, a full-service spa, health, and wellness facility. Students will develop the managerial skills necessary to act as a spa manager, and will be familiarized with planning and organizing all the relevant activities and operations of the wellness center. This program also includes an overview of several spa treatments, as students will assist a professional massage therapist explain to customers the different techniques and spa products. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMST300 | Closed
Hydrotherapy, spa treatments and body treatments are non-medical procedures fundamental in the core business process of spas: healing therapies and treatments. As this course is designed to serve as an introduction to spa treatments, students will be given a comprehensive overview of treatment philosophy and physiology. Students taking this course will examine the benefits and contraindications of all spa therapies, treatments, and techniques. A strong emphasis will be placed upon hydrotherapy, the physical properties of water, the use of water in spa therapy, balneotherapy, thalassotherapy mineral springs, bathing, soaking, hot tubs, Finnish sauna, hammam, showers, hoses and other water concepts. To ensure students are prepared to properly identify the body-mind connection, they will learn about major human body systems, such as muscles, joints, and bones, the nervous system, the circulatory system, the cardiovascular system, and skin and nail structure. Students will also learn to meet spa industry service standards and will be able to follow sanitation and infection prevention and control guidelines, in order to comply with industry health and safety regulations.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability

3.0 Credits
Architectural Restoration & History of Architecture | Course #: IDRHMA360 | Closed
This course consists of theoretic and practical lessons that gradually and comprehensively allow the student to approach the logic's of the composite syntax and design problems of contemporary architecture. Students will conduct a critical analysis of concrete examples of architecture through the works of globally recognized architects, presented in individual lessons focusing on the direct and cross-sectional approach to such architects in order to draw out significant relationships of methods and language from their projects and singular experiences. The principal objective posed by this course is to understand the original features of an architectural project or research, starting from a reflection upon the "elements of architectural composition," their application, and the evolution of architecture. The analysis is conducted with a historical time-frame, starting from a study of the masters of architecture such as Boullee' and Palladio and how the application of their teachings is located in subsequent architects such as Thomas Jefferson and arrives at the works of masterpieces modern architects such as Le Corbusier, Louis Khan, Mies van der Rohe, and Frank Lloyd Wright and those from the Italian panorama including Carlo Scarpa. The concluding studies will be concentrated on current masters working in the field such as Alvaro Siza, Peter Zumthor and Santiago Calatrava.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Interior and Industrial Design | Course #: IDIDCD280 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Technical Drawings and CAD or equivalent
In this course students will learn the concepts and techniques of
creating, viewing and manipulating 3D models. Through the generation of drawings and perspectives, students develop an in-depth understanding of the modeling and rendering techniques used for creating objects, furniture and interior spaces.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Interior and Industrial Design | Course #: IDIDID300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Interior Design
3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours)
this course is focused on the student's realization of an individual project
with the interior design of a public or private space. the emphasis of
the course is to introduce the student to the balance of the threefold
relationship between the physical, the functional and the aesthetic in
interior design. the discussion and analysis of contemporary Italian
trends in interior design form an integral part of the course. an open
critique session will follow every major project submission. Field trips are
an important part of the course.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Interior Design
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Interior and Industrial Design | Course #: IDIDIL270 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Interior Design
This course introduces students to the art and technology of lighting and explores the use of lighting as a design element in the interior environment. Students will learn how to analyze lighting installations, calculate lighting levels for interiors, select appropriate light fixtures, and prepare a lighting plan based on one of their studio projects. Emphasis will be placed on technical and aesthetic issues in relation to the illumination of interiors. This course includes Fab Lab studio hours.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDDT300 | Open
Design thinking refers to creative strategies designers use during the process of designing. Focused on listening, user empathy, whole-brain thinking, collaboration, and experimentation, design thinking can be applied within any team and in any field, from architecture and design to healthcare and product development. This course applies design thinking methodology to everyday problems and provides students with the tools they need to become innovative thinkers. Envisioned as a collaborative lab, this course fosters the integration of research, problem-forming and problem-solving, aesthetics, technology, prototyping, and publishing, with a strong focus on user's needs. Several tools to help students understand design thinking as a problem-solving approach are introduced throughout the course. Case-studies from different organizations that used design thinking to uncover compelling solutions are used to support instruction. This course delves into the fundamentals of th0is creative approach by immersing students in dynamic discussions, relevant readings, and team exercises. Throughout the course, students learn how to empathize with the needs and motivations of the end users, discover new ideas for solving a problem and how to apply strategies and methodologies drawn from a wider range of creative design practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDPF315 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Introduction to 3D Printing and Fabrication or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
In this advanced 3D and Fabrication course, students will learn about the practical differences between Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining and 3D Printing and how to select the right technology for different manufacturing needs, volumes, and materials. This course will allow students to master the fundamentals of CNC operations providing learners with a thorough knowledge of CNC principles and machine structures, manufacture planning, manual part programming and editing. Investigation of materials, prototyping and testing, physical mock-ups and the application of new fabrication processes is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: Introduction to 3D Printing and Fabrication or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDRD300 | Closed
This course is aimed at two different audiences. Design students who want to learn to build simple interactive prototypes to illustrate and study their ideas. Research-oriented students, who want to develop skills needed in design research, as well as the ability to illustrate their ideas with simple interactive prototypes, and an ability to develop those ideas through user-centered methods. In this course, students will learn how to design and prototype user interfaces to address the users and tasks identified in research. Through a series of lectures and exercises, students will learn and practice paper techniques and other low-fidelity prototyping techniques; they will learn and apply principles from graphic design, including design patterns; they will learn to write a design rationale; and how to design for specific populations and situations, including principles and practices of accessible design.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sustainable Architecture and Design | Course #: IDDAAD450 | Open
Pre-requisite: An A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course allows the student from architecture and interior design backgrounds to gain first-hand experience of professional design contexts. Internship students will practice their creative skills with studio teams or individual professionals. Tasks may include initial observations of the professional environment, working on design samples, drafting by hand or digitally, practice AutoCAD layouts and rending, and assisting the organization with logistical duties. Student involvement will not involve solo project development but require collaborative engagement within the organization's ongoing projects according to the student's skill and competency levels. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Sustainable Architecture and Design | Course #: IDIDAD450 | Open
Pre-requisite: An A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course allows the student from architecture and interior design backgrounds to gain first-hand experience of professional design contexts. Internship students will practice their creative skills with studio teams or individual professionals. Tasks may include initial observations of the professional environment, working on design samples, drafting by hand or digitally, practice AutoCAD layouts and rending, and assisting the organization with logistical duties. Student involvement will not involve solo project development but require collaborative engagement within the organization's ongoing projects according to the student's skill and competency levels. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120

Italian Studies and Linguistics

3.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI200 | Open
Pre-requisite:
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCP310 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The aim of this course is to study Italian culture through action and participation, and to build awareness from the perspective of active engagement beyond mere observation. The course concept is intended to give students a better understanding of contemporary Italian society and culture politics, economy, social environment, traditions and compare their current expressions with historical contexts by using hands-on and interactive participation in cultural integration programs that involve the local community. An important element of this course is the Italian language component, which acts as a bridge to Italian culture based on communication skills. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply their basic knowledge of Italian language to fulfill course requirements. The course is designed to expand the students global prospective through constant reflection and constructive criticism in order to incorporate intercultural knowledge into a richly articulated awareness of the self intended as the individual, as the individual within a community, and the individual within a culture. The Cultural Perspective course includes: 10 visits in Florence, regular involvement in activities related to cultural immersion and fieldwork. During the semester it also includes a weekend research trip to Sicily as an integral component of the academic coursework. During Summer sessions, the course includes a weekend trip to Rome and one weekend trip to Verona and lakes as an integral component of the academic coursework. The course focuses on cognitive development, cultural awareness, and intercultural and interpersonal communication by integrating and placing the student in direct contact with local culture.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 135
6.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: PSFLCI207 | Open
Pre-requisite: Class will begin prior to the start of the semester. Students need to arrive in ROME
One week before semester/summer session with focus on Italian culture: Rome, Southern Tuscany, Versilia (Fall-Summer), Rome-Orvieto-Perugia (Spring). The course consists of 3 hours of Italian culture with a language component per day, on-site teaching. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITCI101 | Open
This course focuses on the relationship between students and the city. Students will have an overview on basic Italian Language structures used to develop communication skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in daily life context e.g. shopping for food, clothes, interacting with Italians, talking about yourself, habits, hobbies. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before. Through lessons students will be invited to practice the acquired knowledge in a native environment.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITIB165 | Open
The intensive six-credit Italian course gives students the opportunity to experience total immersion in the language. Students will develop the four cornerstones of foreign language study, comprehension, readings, writing, and, above all, speaking. All lessons will be taught in Italian. Students will begin the course with a comprehensive Florentine cultural and practical orientation, including site visits and walking tours. Students will have a one time cooking and language lab and dinner together. The beginning levels concentrate on the development of the spoken language and on the ability to understand. the intermediate levels help students to master more complex grammatical structures and to enrich their vocabulary with the use of contemporary material such as newspapers and videos. In addition, students will compose short written essays.
Contact Hours: 90
9.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITIB175 | Open
The intensive nine-credit Italian course gives students the opportunity to experience total immersion in the language. Students will develop the four cornerstones of foreign language study, comprehension, readings, writing, and, above all, speaking. All lessons will be taught in Italian. Students will begin the course with a comprehensive Florentine cultural and practical orientation, including site visits and walking tours. This class meets Monday to Thursday for three hours per session; in addition there is a Monday lecture and Tuesday film series as well as mandated hours in the language lab. Students will have a one-time cooking and language lab and dinner together. The course concludes with a week of in-depth review and final exam. The beginning levels concentrate on the development of the spoken language and on the ability to understand. The intermediate levels help students to master more complex grammatical structures and to enrich their vocabulary with the use of contemporary material such as newspapers and videos. In addition, students will compose short written essays. At the advanced levels students will develop what they have learned in the previous levels and will further progress in their ability to produce written texts and to be able to discuss specific topics without pre-preparation
Contact Hours: 135
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII201 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII215 | Open
Pre-requisite: 1 semester of Italian language or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The intensive six-credit Italian course gives students the opportunity to experience total immersion in the language. Students will develop the four cornerstones of foreign language study, comprehension, readings, writing, and, above all, speaking. All lessons will be taught in Italian. Students will begin the course with a comprehensive Florentine cultural and practical orientation, including site visits and walking tours. This class
meets Monday to Thursday for three hours per session during the semester and Monday through Friday in the summer sessions; in addition there is a Monday lecture and Tuesday film series as well as mandated hours in the language lab. Students will have a one-time cooking and language lab and dinner together. The course concludes with a week of in-depth review and final exam in week 12 of the semester or day 12 of the summer sessions. The beginning levels concentrate on the development of the spoken language and on the ability to understand. The intermediate levels help students to master more complex grammatical structures and to enrich their vocabulary with the use of contemporary material such as
newspapers and videos. In addition, students will compose short written essays. At the advanced levels students will develop what they have learned in the previous levels and will further progress in their ability to produce written texts and to be able to discuss specific topics without pre-preparation.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII250 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of subjunctive and all four tenses.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 45

Journalism, Communication, and Publishing

3.0 Credits
Creative Advertising | Course #: CPCRCM360 | Closed
Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and la Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been created and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropoli and developing destinations will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Advertising | Course #: CPCRWM325 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing
Recent years have seen the evolution and revolution in business communication. The birth of the web was the inspiration that led to a different way of relating between companies and customers. Approaches led to a constant customer participation in the creation and development of the business image. Web marketing is based on techniques and principles applicable to all sectors and also suitable for small and medium-sized enterprises up to now often cut off from mass media because of the enormous budget required. But the web is not just sites, in recent years social networks have pointed the way towards a clear undisputed sway. Communication on social networks isn't only about purchasing advertising as in traditional media or even on most websites. The social is the most striking feature of what is called Web 2.0: the network of conversations; and the conversations don't occur only among customers, but must exist between the company and customers to stimulate the most powerful communication tool: word of mouth. A company that does not speak with customers is bound to be forgotten.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CPJLJO350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project course is offered to highly motivated students who want to enter and practice first hand the world of magazine editing and proofreading. The student will be in charge, under the supervision of professionals, develop feature writing through the steps of checking for accuracy and suitability, digital and traditional printing, and design. Knowledge and experience in magazine and newspaper production is always extremely helpful for higher editorial positions. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCHC350 | Open
This course focuses on the role of communication in public health, the development and practice of health communication strategies, and how health campaigns, medical journalism, and an increasing community participation in online health outreach impact society and wellbeing. Starting from theories of past and present health communication, students will examine how health information is delivered and perceived, the influence of media on public health outcomes, and the cons/risks of media strategies on healthcare practitioners and beneficiaries. Case studies will be analyzed to gage effectiveness and to discuss the findings of current research and scholarship on communication management in medical systems. Students will be asked to compare communication strategies in international contexts, as well as gain perspective on the implications of health communication as practiced in a country like Italy where healthcare is highly state-subsidized. Prerequisites: Introduction to Public Relations or Communication, an introductory health systems course, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCPR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCPR450 | Closed
Pre-requisite: C1 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations internship course, students will learn how to promote a clients business, image, or product. Public relations
focus on managing a clients key messages through media releases, editorial
content, and promotion. An emphasis is placed on the strategic management and evaluation of key communication systems employed in public relations related projects. Tasks may include general administrative and logistical tasks, content creation and editing, and tracking media results. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends and holidays.This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCSM250 | Open
Pre-requisite: One communication course or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
What do we mean by "community?" How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks (such as Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin), old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires active participation of students and a willingness to immerse in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. As a practicum, those who complete this course will know how to chat, blog, tag, wiki, avatar, comment, twitter and flicker productively - and have some notion of how these practices affect self and community.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCWE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, web back office experience.
Through this special project course, the student will be able to research and develop web content for professional websites. Guided by a Communications Office, the student will be involved in web-based projects to develop written and visual content for digital platforms. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. The placement may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based and editorial activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. 
Main tasks: Digital content creation and revision, visual content development, audience/reader-oriented research, SEO analysis, site performance review, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option.
Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, web back office experience.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPPUBP350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project course is designed as a full immersion in the world of publishing through collaboration with Ingorda for Florence Campus Publishing, the FUA university press. Students will work on publications throughout the special project experience. All areas of book publishing will be covered, from concept creation to research, writing, photography, graphic layout and design, production, and marketing and distribution. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPPULM330 | Open
The first of a two part series on magazine production, lifestyle Magazine I gives students a professional magazine production experience in an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production and distribution of a full color lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. the magazine and its semester format will represent the students approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. this project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: PSSPBP350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project course is designed as a full immersion in the world of publishing through collaboration with Ingorda for Florence Campus Publishing, the FUA university press. Students will work on publications throughout the special project experience. All areas of book publishing will be covered, from concept creation to research, writing, photography, graphic layout and design, production, and marketing and distribution. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150

Liberal Arts

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI200 | Open
Pre-requisite: Mandatory pre-departure readings must be fulfilled prior to program start. Lectures and learning activities held in different locations. This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students.
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.

Pre-semester Field Learning program Sunday Aug 27, 2017 - Students arrive (Rome, by 5pm) Monday Aug 28 - Orientation Monday Aug 28 to Sunday Sept 3 Cultural Introduction to Italy Sunday Sept 3 - Classes end (Florence)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: LAAHFW280 | Closed
This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces both visible and invisible the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: LAAHSF300 | Closed
The development of the city of Florence and that of the Church are inextricably linked with one another; Christian, and more specifically, Catholic faith provided a framework for one's life, informed the development of social institutions and governing bodies, and inspired the development and flourishing of art and architecture during the period that would come to be known as the Renaissance. In short, this faith touched every aspect of life in the Florence of centuries past, and its present is still seen, felt, and experienced when moving through the dense urban fabric of the city. This course will also investigate the ways in which religious faith permeated numerous aspects of Florentine society and daily life, from the monasteries and convents spread throughout the city, to its charitable institutions and hospitals, to the care for the souls of the condemned, and, more joyfully, to celebratory traditions that survive to the present day. Themed walks will offer an opportunity to explore these themes through engaging with works of sacred art and architecture, as well as sites and routes of religious significance. Works and structures will be contextualized within the historic period in which they were produced, allowing students to understand how and why they were executed, as well as to explore the significance they would have held for their original viewers and to discuss what they mean to beholders today. The analysis of these spaces, places, and works will highlight additional layers of meaning and interpretation: life, death, violence, popular culture, and social change, among others. Open to students from all backgrounds and academic concentrations, this course will allow participants to discover the city of Florence through a unique lens while simultaneously encouraging them to learn about Italian historical epochs and the cultural diversity of its traditions. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHAH210 | Open
This introductory art history course will take students through seven centuries of Italian and European art from the classical Greek and Roman world period up to and including the eighteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to Florentine and Italian art of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and to the 'golden age' of the Renaissance period. This course is aimed at students who have not taken a history of western art course before. Slide lectures will alternate with on-site teaching in Florence, including architectural walking tours and visits to museums, churches and palaces.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHCI200 | Closed
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: LACLBT280 | Open
Bibliotherapy is a systematic method that utilizes literature and other narrative forms to transform traditional reading into a strategy to cope with a variety of psychological conditions. The activity of reading as a healing practice comes from a longstanding tradition: bibliotherapy dates back to ancient Greece, when libraries were seen as sacred places with healing powers. Particular attention will be given to the history of using literature for healing purposes, starting from the first historical references to the present day. This course will focus on developing a deep understanding of the therapeutic functions of books for psychological issues such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and emotional and social development in adolescence. Coursework will examine the spectrum of bibliotherapeutic techniques and will enable students to experience bibliotherapy in action.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: LACLBT285 | Open
Bibliotherapy is a systematic method that utilizes literature and other narrative forms to transform traditional reading into a strategy to cope with a variety of psychological conditions. The activity of reading as a healing practice comes from a longstanding tradition: bibliotherapy dates back to ancient Greece, when libraries were seen as sacred places with healing powers. Particular attention will be given to the history of using literature for healing purposes, starting from the first historical references to the present day. This course will focus on developing a deep understanding of the therapeutic functions of books for psychological issues such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and emotional and social development in adolescence. Coursework will examine the spectrum of bibliotherapeutic techniques and will enable students to experience bibliotherapy in action. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: LACMHM380 | Closed
This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics and society from the nineteenth century until the present day. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia in the past 30 years, to the nature of Mafia activities and their spread beyond Sicily to the Italian mainland and the relationship of 'Cosa Nostra' to the United States. Lectures and discussions will be heavily supplemented with newspaper/magazine articles, films (documentary and fictional) and contemporary literature.
Please note that films and documentaries will be viewed outside of
regularly scheduled class time.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: LACRHR280 | Open
Only in 20th century the international community has progressively
elaborated rules and procedures to state that certain behaviors are
crimes and to make possible the punishment of those committing these acts. The course will provide an introduction to the birth, evolution and contemporary challenges of human rights, humanitarian law and the international systems to maintain peace or restore justice. It aims at offering an overview of the history of Human Rights from their appearance on international scene to contemporary debates; it will analyze the process of definition of crimes against Humanity, crimes against Peace, War crimes and genocide and the mechanisms to protect Humanitarian law: from the emergency logic of Newberg trial after World War II to the institutionalization of International Criminal Justice and the various typologies of humanitarian interventions: Peacekeeping, Peace-making, Peace-enforcing.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition and Creative Writing | Course #: LACWCW200 | Open
This course is based on an introduction to fiction writing. Topics cover the technical elements of fiction writing through lectures and in-class writing exercises that develop dialogue, voice, plot, image, character development, point of view, scene, structure, and other prose skills. Coursework will be further enriched with assignments that students will use in writing more substantial pieces of fiction. Students will learn to critique work from a writer's perspective. Prerequisites: Foundational writing skills are not covered. Students are expected to apply a strong command of syntax, structure, and style according to the course topic.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition and Creative Writing | Course #: LACWLM330 | Open
The first of a two-part series on magazine production, this course gives students a professional magazine production experience as an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production, and distribution of a professional lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. The magazine and its semiannual format will represent the student's approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc. from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine of FUA's campus press Ingorda. This project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
European Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAAHMA360 | Closed
This course consists of theoretical and practical approaches that gradually and comprehensively allow the student to approach the logic of composite syntax and design problematics of contemporary architecture. Students will conduct a critical analysis of concrete examples of architecture through the works of globally recognized architects, presented in individual lessons focusing on a direct and cross-sectional approach in order to draw out significant relationships of methods and language from their projects and singular experiences. The principal objective posed by this course is to understand the original features of an architectural project or research, starting from a reflection upon the "elements of architectural composition," their application, and the evolution of architecture. The analysis is conducted with a historical timeframe, starting from a study of the masters of architecture such as Boulle and Palladio and how the application of their teachings is located in subsequent architects such as Thomas Jefferson and arrives at the works of masterpieces modern architects such as Le Corbusier, Louis Khan, Mies van der Rohe, and Frank Lloyd Wright and those from the Italian panorama including Carlo Scarpa. The concluding studies will be concentrated on current masters working in the field such as Alvaro Siza, Peter Zumthor, and Santiago Calatrava.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSFW280 | Open
This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces both visible and invisible the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSHM380 | Closed
This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics and society from the nineteenth century until the present day. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia in the past 30 years, to the nature of Mafia activities and their spread beyond Sicily to the Italian mainland and the relationship of 'Cosa Nostra' to the United States. Lectures and discussions will be heavily supplemented with newspaper/magazine articles, films (documentary and fictional) and contemporary literature.
Please note that films and documentaries will be viewed outside of
regularly scheduled class time.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSIR330 | Closed
This course explores the meaning of the term 'Renaissance' when applied to the period of Italian history from circa 1350 to 1550. The subject will be approached from a variety of standpoints: social, political, economic, intellectual, scientific and artistic. The focus will be on the concept of Italian Renaissance Humanism and on the relationship between art and society during this period. Lectures will be supplemented by a number of visits to key historical sites in Florence. Field trips and museum visits are an intricate part of the course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSSR350 | Closed
Beginning with an examination of the "how to" advice manuals
common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this
course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, conception and childbirth, to an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence, where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy could have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Much use will be made of Renaissance art where erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSSS330 | Open
History has demonstrated that saints would not have existed without sinners and vice versa. The course will examine the encounters and interrelationships between saints and sinners over the course of Italian history. In many cases, the Saint was also a former Sinner but rarely the other way around. The great Saint Augustine, for example, is a testament to former sinners as seen in his famous Confessions in which his vivid, at times red-light experiences as a young man are described and redeemed by a saintly life. The texts, at times, almost hint at a subtle vein of regret and faint whiffs of nostalgia for the dolce vita of Augstines past. The same can be said of Saint Francis, who was known for conducting a dissipated, playboy-oriented lifestyle in Assisi conveniently financed by his rich father Bernardone. In other cases, history has documented epic clashes between sinners and saints-to-be. Between the dying Lorenzo il Magnifico and the future saint Savonarola, for example, in which the latter refused to absolve the former who had refused to confess his sins. Saint Bellarmine, Galileo�s inquisitor, condemned the scientist for demonstrating the error of the Sacred Scripture regarding the geocentrism, demonstrating yet again a saints victory. Another topic that will be examined by the course is the posthumous redemption of sinners such as the Giuseppe Verdis Lady of the Camellias in La Traviata and the lovers Paolo and Francesca in Dantes Divina Commedia.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Education | Course #: LAIEEC450 | Open
Pre-requisite: An A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Childcare area is a varied and flexible career path. This internship course offers the opportunity to be involved in the field of childcare education at locations such as childcare institutions, private households, and public and private schools. Interns interact with children and help them with different activities such as stimulating cognitive skills through games and animation of body language, language development, creative art-based activities, and daily operations as required by the placement organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
International Education | Course #: LAIEEF450 | Open
Pre-requisite: An A2 level of Italian language and TEFL/CELTA certification are required for the internship. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course for teaching English as a foreign language is offered to highly motivated students seeking future careers in the field of English language teaching within the challenging environment of a foreign culture. The internship course will immerse students within contexts involving Italian students or adults of different social and educational backgrounds. Internship topics include but are not limited to lesson planning, tutoring, language assessment, textbook selection, and can also include research duties. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
International Education | Course #: LAIEET610 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program.
This graduate-level course is aimed at students who are willing to engage in a career in the field of international education, and who wish to acquire relevant perspectives and skills to teach classes to an international audience, both abroad and in their home country. The course will provide a theoretical background on most up-to-date and engaging teaching strategies to address a multicultural class, as well as a hands-on case-study based framework of elements of reference to build effective and stimulating teaching situations, with consistent reference to both didactic and educational objectives of a course. This course is made unique due to its connection with the three main educational assets implemented as core educational values by FUA: cultural integration, community engagement, and experiential learning. Experiential learning at FUA rethinks the concepts of the classroom and field experiences as related rather than distinct environments. The classroom is an on-going environment that extends beyond the physical spaces of lecture halls and laboratories; classroom learning is applied to the outer world. Field experiences must be rooted in academic contexts and give back to classroom learning a wider perspective of taught knowledge. Experiential learning is an active and lasting contribution, based on cultural integration, of international student perspectives to the local culture, and vice versa. Outreach and collaboration with the community increase awareness and expand an engaged knowledge of the local territory.

Therefore, FUA offers a unique learning model that allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice applied to real-life situations while learning comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving strategies, and leadership and management skills. Course topics provide a theoretical framework for engaging teaching strategies for the multicultural classroom. Hands-on approaches and case studies of effective and stimulating teaching situations will be covered, with consistent reference to the didactic objective of a course. The course is unique for the exploration of FUA�s approach to experiential learning: experiential learning (EL), field learning (FL), and service learning (SL). Cultural integration through outreach and collaboration with the community encourages an active exchange between student and local perspectives as an important basis for an active contribution of EL-FL-SL in the learning path. Participants of this course will learn how the teaching experience represents one of the many components of the overall study abroad experience in order to acquire the necessary expertise to manage international learning environments in a dynamic and community-geared context of cultural integration. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
International Education | Course #: LAIERM560 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program.
This graduate-level course develops previous studies on academic research methods to prepare instructors in the application of research to teaching undergraduate students in an international environment. Research methodologies will be regarded as an essential tool in the implementation of effective teaching in both multicultural classrooms and contexts where students need to establish an effective relationship local resources for the successful experience of an internationally-based study curriculum. The course will begin with an examination of how the instructional literacy of instructors can be enhanced through cross-cultural research approaches. Building on the topics introduced in the Strategies for Effective Teaching in International Education course for learning and student management, the research methodologies course focuses specifically on familiarization with local institutions and resource systems in the effort to create relevant connections between the cultural integration component of international education and the academic resources offered by a local community. Field learning visits to local institutions, discussions on how research methods can be applied to diverse categories of undergraduate courses, gaining leadership competency in guiding students through research abroad, and specific case students of how research contributes to the overall learning community of a campus will be addressed throughout the duration of the course. Prerequisites: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
International Education | Course #: LAIESA350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project course through the Student Life and Development Office offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of the study abroad experience from the perspective of the hosting country. The SLD office is the main point of reference for all incoming students. Responsibilities range from assisting with planning, organizing and promoting activities, contributing articles to the school publications, and general office duties. Students are expected to effectively collect and share information to students and the academic community. Students assist with the preparation of all orientation materials for future sessions and students. Furthermore they will learn to handle sensitive issues related to culture shock and adjusting to studying/living abroad as well as leading facility tours for institutional visitors and potential students. Special projects are assigned depending on the area of interest. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Music and Performing Arts | Course #: LAPAMP450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A2 recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The music and performing arts internships aim to match the student's academic background to the diversified environments of creative industries. Students who apply for this internship will experience the dynamic world of entertainment, artists, and performing arts organization in the local community. Placements may range from organization, management, promotion, and marketing in the performing arts. Interns should be prepared to start gradually and maintain schedule flexibility as performing arts engagements may take place in the evenings. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Music and Performing Arts | Course #: LAPAPV300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement audition to determine level and skills.