Florence University of the Arts
Fall Short Programs 2019
3 - 15 credits

FUA short programs are designed to allow a great deal of flexibility for untraditional study abroad timing. FUA’s 3 week short programs offer four start dates in the fall, and four start dates in the spring. Short programs can be combined back-to-back to create a longer 7 or 11 week program. In each 3 week program students select 1 or 2 courses for a total of 3 - 6 credits.


Application Deadline
Session I: June 15, 2019
Session II: June 15, 2019
Session III: June 15, 2019
Session IV: June 15, 2019
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
USF student conduct form
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Offers flexibility for untraditional study abroad timing
  • Students can opt to take one 3 week short program or combine sessions for a total of 7 or 11 weeks

Program Dates
Session I: Aug 27, 2019 – Sept 20, 2019
Session II: Sept 27, 2019 – Oct 18, 2019
Session III: Oct 25, 2019 – Nov 16, 2019
Session IV: Nov 22, 2019 – Dec 12, 2019


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Hospitality
Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Journalism, Communication, and Publishing
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Hospitality Management | Course #: BUMAOB470 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Human Resources Management or equivalent
The aim of this course is to provide an overview of main theoretical concepts of organizational behavior (OB) and their application in contemporary hospitality organizations. The course covers various topics in OB, which are generally grouped into the individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis. The course balances conceptual knowledge with practical application. Lectures will provide a broad overview of the course topic and explain key concepts to be used in understanding phenomena occurring in the business world. Relevant case studies will be discussed in class in order to develop skills in applying knowledge to practical situations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAEF280 | Section: IV | Open
This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. The experiential learning component will enhance the students perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM360 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKRS320 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on exposure to sales and retail through an understanding of the strategies related to the supply chain, competitors, suppliers, and customers. Coursework will provide students with the knowledge of the tools and decisions applied by international and Italian companies to maintain clientele loyalty. The managerial component of the course will also give students an understanding of basic management methods in terms of product flow, marketing tools, and geography-specific analysis in retail marketing.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKRS325 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on exposure to sales and retail through an understanding of the strategies related to the supply chain, competitors, suppliers, and customers. Coursework will provide students with the knowledge of the tools and decisions applied by international and Italian companies to maintain clientele loyalty. The managerial component of the course will also give students an understanding of basic management methods in terms of product flow, marketing tools, and geography-specific analysis in retail marketing. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREAV340 | Section: III | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with the main concepts and methods of valuing real estate. Students will explore the property valuation profession, gaining knowledge of the five traditional methods of valuation and undertaking their own valuation calculations. This course also focuses on ROI (return on investment) analysis for real estate investments for tourism purposes. Students will also become familiar with the different methods of measurement and valuation standards
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREIH320 | Section: II | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge on the role of urban policy and planning in relation to the housing market in a global context. Students will become familiar with the implications for policy and practice and will learn how to develop regional and local housing strategies. This course includes references to international cases from the United Kingdom, the United States, Ireland, Hong Kong, Australia, and other European countries. Student will gain knowledge of the impact that the emerging sharing economies have on urban development, as well as learning about the process of buying an Italian property as a secondary home.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREPM330 | Section: I | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge of professional property management. Students will become familiar with the different management methods, such as ownership and subleases, as well as the new specific insurance practices for the tourist rental market. This course focuses on major functions of property managers, and details specific practices and problems in managing a variety of properties, such as residential, retail and industrial ones. Students will also learn how to manage maintenance, construction, insurance, and relations with tenants.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREPM335 | Section: I | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge of professional property management. Students will become familiar with the different management methods, such as ownership and subleases, as well as the new specific insurance practices for the tourist rental market. This course focuses on major functions of property managers, and details specific practices and problems in managing a variety of properties, such as residential, retail and industrial ones. Students will also learn how to manage maintenance, construction, insurance, and relations with tenants. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHAD400 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Intermediate Digital Photography or equivalent.
his course is strictly a technical course intended to prepare students and give them the tools to create a mature visual expression in photography for their final projects. Students will learn advanced and unique black and white printing, studio lighting, and large format printing. Visual assignments will be used to accompany the specific learning techniques. Techniques: Piezography (black and white printing), large format printing, Photoshop plug-ins, scanning, fine art paper, studio lighting. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP210 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.
The course is based on a series of theoretical lectures on the
technical, cultural, visual, and historic aspects of fashion photography. Fashion photography history will be analyzed from the beginning of the 20th century through contemporary works, following the continuously changing fashion styles and trends of today. This introductory course will concentrate on the technical and logistical aspects of fashion photography using natural light and light basic metering. This course combines introduction to photographic techniques with an emphasis on fashion photography. The first six lessons students will be guided through basic (introductory) camera usage. The later part of this course students will be challenged on basic fashion photography assignments.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP360 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: At least one film photography course and an understanding of film processing/printing, camera reciprocity, and darkroom chemistry. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is both a technical and a creative course intended for intermediate / advanced film photography students. Using medium format and large format cameras, students will choose a format size to complete a singular photography project. Students will learn advanced and unique black and white processing/printing by studying development time matrixes, studio lighting, and large format printing. Visual assignments and readings will be used to accompany the specific learning techniques. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: At least one film photography course and an understanding of film processing/printing, camera reciprocity, and darkroom chemistry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID180 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.


Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID185 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.
This introductory class introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. Single lens reflex camera (DSLR) as well as point and shoot cameras are allowed. This course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. Assignments, lectures, readings and excursions progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive overview of both the history of the medium and its contemporary practice. Color correction, retouching, and compositing techniques are covered and complemented by further development of digital capture and printing techniques. Requires 150 experiential learning hours. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Please contact FUA if you have doubts regarding your camera.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID300 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Please contact SAI admissions if you have doubts regarding your camera.
This course is designed for students who have learned the basic skills of introductory digital photography and would like to further advance their knowledge. A focus on visual and conceptual aspects of photography will be a major topic in this course in addition to refinement of up-to-date techniques. Students are involved in more complex and challenging photography projects and begin to experiment with their personal vision identities and expressions. This course will constitute the differences of making vs taking a photograph or producing vs consuming images. Critical visual analysis of both contemporary photographic work as well as arming the students with technical and conceptual tools will help the student build an understanding of photographs. Students will work on several long term projects. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID305 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent. A digital camera of at least 8.0 megapixels with an optical zoom lens 3X or more is required. A 35 mm traditional reflex camera can also be helpful.
This course is designed for students who have experience in the digital photography world and who would like to broaden their knowledge to a more advanced level. A deep focus on up-to-date techniques and technologies will be a major topic in the course, in addition to the refinement of visual and conceptual aspects of digital photography. The instructor will guide students in gaining advanced skills in photo computer software. The objective of the course is to create a mature visual expression in the digital photographic world.

This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.




Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHLA300 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.
The city of Florence, with its backdrop of Medieval and Renaissance buildings coupled with the varied beauty of the Tuscan countryside, will offer students a stimulating range of opportunities for landscape and architectural photography. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and the exploration of several camera format techniques, lenses as well as printing. By studying influential photographers com-positional and artistic issues of parallax, distortion and perspective will be addressed and executed through assignments. A personal vision will be nurtured and guided by the instructor for the final project in a series of
landscape/naturalistic/architectural visual context. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This is a specialized course which requires at least one specialized lens. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPJ320 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended
This course introduces students to the world of photography with specific focus on the photo-journalistic aspects of this art medium. The course will be divided between field study and learning introductory digital techniques, working with both black and white and color digital printing and finishing. the lab practice will give students the capability of elaborating and correctly printing his/her own pictures. the course concentrates on the journalistic area of photography using digital equipment. Students learn about the history, com positional issues and techniques of photojournalism by studying the work of influential photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Smith, Capa, Salgado, Nachtwey, and others. The class will also be conceiving, shooting, printing and laying out a series of documentary projects. This course is recommended for communications, journalism and social science
students. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHTC370 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art History or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course examines major philosophies and concepts that have contributed to the discussion of art theory, aesthetic discourse, and contemporary criticism. Reading and analyzing various texts from antiquity to the present, students will explore the underlying questions and meanings of art and how they interact or conflict throughout the development of Western thought. The aim of this course is to equip the student with a foundation in art theory in order to develop an informed critical approach. Texts covered in class will include writings by philosophers, critics, and artists such as Plato, Alberti, Kant, Benjamin, Greenberg, Barthes, Baudrillard, Lippard, and Trin T. Minha. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art History.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIVCAD330 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Visual Communication Design Fundamentals Studio I, Introduction to Digital Graphic Illustration.
This course focuses on the creation of projects in advertising campaigns from the initial research and creative strategy to the final execution of a comprehensive commercial project. Students will be taken through the principles of art direction and layout as well as the marketing aspects of an advertising campaign, working with a copywriter, learning techniques for idea visualization, and structuring the campaign to the requirements of the client.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: PSELID185 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current
complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic
concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be
involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIITWD200 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, web back office experience.
This lab-based course trains students to develop effective graphic design interfaces for the web. Students will be introduced to software and technical information for maps, hot spots, links, and site management. Additional topics include search engines, on-line services, and web development.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCCG150 | Section: II | Open
This computer graphics introductory course will cover the following topics: computer generated art, adobe Photoshop, photo adjustments and effects, computer drawing, morphing and modeling in Photoshop and editing. Students will compile a personal portfolio, presenting it to the class at the end of the semester or session.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF190 | Section: IV | Open
This course introduces the student to the principles and basic elements of graphic design. Through a series of assignments and exercises, students will learn and practice hand, eye and problem-solving skills. Topics include: shape, basic color theory, framing, shape and color layout, formats, creative typography, logo creation, symbols and trademarks. the course focuses mainly on manual (non-computer) techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF250 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Visual Communication I or equivalent. Knowledge of Adobe Suite is required.
The aim of this course is to provide the students with a strong base for designing effective visual communications that are able to inform and motivate the viewer. The main purpose of this course is for students to develop a research and experimentation approach in order to understand the diverse aspects of visual design. Through a series of exercises, students will be able to master basic design principles, conceptual problem-solving methods, and critical thinking skills. This will allow them to evaluate the effectiveness of their work. Topics also include content in typography, layout, logo design, and poster design. This course includes Fab Lab studio hours and experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: Visual Communication I or equivalent. Knowledge of Adobe Suite is required.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCMM340 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics, Digital Graphic Illustration.
Multimedia studio is a studio course that focuses on the experience of producing complete multimedia works in a project-based environment. lectures and meetings augment this studio course. Individual creativity is stressed as well as collaboration in the creation of works through individual and group projects. assignments vary in scale, and focus on appropriate planning, design and execution, as well as acquisition and creation of content in various media. Previously introduced concepts and technology are re-explored with an emphasis on integration and effectiveness in the communication of the concept of the piece.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCWD200 | Section: IV | Open
This lab-based course trains students to develop effective graphic design interfaces for the Web. Students will be introduced to new software and technical information for maps, hot spots, links and site management. Additional topics include: search engines, on-line services and Web development.
Contact Hours: 45

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAS355 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Sketching and Rendering accessories
Students are introduced to the concept of three-dimensional sketching and how it relates to accessories design. Concentrating on design detail, they learn to sketch the basic shapes in footwear, handbags, personal leather goods, and belts. This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to select a design project in a specific accessories category. Mastery of research techniques, design construction, and oral presentation are fundamental to successful completion of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAS360 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Sketching and Rendering Accessories or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course introduces the concept of three-dimensional sketching and how it relates to accessories design. By concentrating on design detail, students learn how to sketch the basic shapes used in footwear, handbags, personal leather goods, hats, and belts. The course provides students with the opportunity to select a design project in a specific accessories category. Mastery of research techniques, design construction, and project presentation are fundamental for the successful completion of this course. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Sketching and Rendering Accessories or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFW315 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite:
In this course students are introduced to the advanced level of design and production of footwear. This is a fashion design area in which Italy is a market leader and students will analyze the latest styles, leathers, and components in terms of functionality and design. They will continue to develop pattern-making skills by designing and making prototypes of footwear and related accessories.

(90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours)

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADHC330 | Section: I | Open
In this course students learn the basic skills in the design and the production of handbags. the use of pattern making machines and equipments will be learned, together with the construction techniques as well as the analysis of various styles in handbag design. In addition students will translate their own projects into finished products.

(90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 Studio hours)
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADLD370 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Sketching and Rendering accessories
This course focuses on the process of taking design from concept to reality, with an emphasis on production, pricing and distribution. It will provide the basics of supply chain management and provide a framework for understanding how it can be adapted to best support an individual design concept. Students will learn about: materials, color, pattern choices, sourcing, surface design options. The construction process, including prototypes, samples, systems for ensuring quality and fit. Developing and implementing timelines for product development and production costs and pricing decisions, financial planning and available resources.

90 hours (45 lecture hours - 45 Studio hours)
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADSR210 | Section: I | Open
The fundamental aspects of accessory design allow students to learn the drawing and rendering techniques which represent materials and textures for handbags, belts, gloves, shoes and hats. Starting from sketches and basic technical drawing techniques students develop skills to enable them to use several drawings methodologies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFP210 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Basic photography experience and knowledge will be helpful. A digital camera of at least 5.0 mega pixels with an optical zoom lens 3X or more is required. Course Information: Days M, T, W, Th. Times TBA
The course is based on a series of theoretical lectures about the technical, cultural, visual and historical aspects of fashion photography. Fashion photography history will be analyzed from the beginning of the 20th century through contemporary work, following the continuously changing fashion styles and trends. The course will concentrate on technical aspects of fashion photography from location, and portable and studio units, to all aspects of lighting, including natural, artificial, existing light, flash units, and light metering. Students will be guided through up-to-date digital software and technologies into the advertising world. attention to the offset printing technical aspects like color separation, offset film transferring and offset printing will be also given.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCPF280 | Section: IV | Open
This course affords students the possibility to go behind the scenes in exploring the art and business of Italian fashion design. Lectures by industry professionals will be complemented by backstage visits to design studios and possible attendance at seasonal fashion shows.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCWF310 | Section: I | Open
This course introduces writing techniques in the fashion industry. Topics bridge the gap between core writing classes and higher-level fashion courses concentrating on merchandising and promotion by presenting writing strategies intended for the different writing styles required in the industry. Students will learn the methods of effective writing for fashion reports and forecasts, fashion show scripts, public relations, catalog, direct mail, trade and consumer magazines, and online channels. Case studies illustrate examples of effective and ineffective writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFDIC200 | Section: III | Open
This course analyzes fashion-based image consultancy for individual clients as a profession of growing importance in both the fashion and tourism industries. Key course topics include the resources necessary to build a career in consultancy, portfolio building, self-marketing, and client consultation. The course also provides important contextual information related to the dynamics of the fashion industry. Field visits and activities are significant components of the coursework, allowing students to not only familiarize themselves with real working environments but also interact with professionals in order to build competency in networking with future intermediaries and clients.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTADTE348 | Section: III | Open
In this course students acquire basic pattern-making skills while completing a stylized beret, cloche, and fabric hat. Introduces the basic elements of millinery design from conception to construction, including how to make a frame, a block, and a pattern.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDDR240 | Section: III | Open
In this course students learn the clothing construction using the draping techniques. Custom patterns of various designs will be draped. Pattern making by draping of custom patterns in muslin on dress forms or live models are made for any garment and some are cut in intended fabric and constructed. Design of personal dress form will be demonstrated. This class provides education for students entering the fashion industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFD230 | Section: II | Open
This course is an introduction to creative design development and
fashion design skills. topics include: design processes of trend research, storyboard compiling, color story, fabric selection, draping design concepts, design innovation and the 2-D to 3-D development of creative ideas. There will be assigned projects in all of these areas. Students will also be introduced to the basics of fashion illustration. Students prepare for their fourth-semester design collections by exploring the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge of key fashion categories, markets, and price points.



Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFD370 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion Design Studio I
This course is an introduction to creative design development and
fashion design skills. topics include: design processes of trend research, storyboard compiling, color story, fabric selection, draping design concepts, design innovation and the 2-D to 3-D development of creative ideas. There will be assigned projects in all of these areas. Students will also be introduced to the basics of fashion illustration. Students prepare for their fourth-semester design collections by exploring the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge of key fashion categories, markets, and price points.



Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFD375 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion Design Studio I or equivalent.
This course represents the advanced level exploration of fashion design studio topic. The course focuses on the study of the fashion industry with emphasis on design and construction. Students develop their design collections by exploring and analyzing the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process focusing on economic, and cultural contents. Concepts are applied with hands-on learning experiences as students study, textiles, fashion design, apparel construction, consumer behavior, products, and materials of the fashion industry. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Fashion Design Studio I or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDKW200 | Section: II | Open
Knitwear design is a longstanding tradition that is is emerging again as an important professional discipline in the fashion industry. In this course, students familiarize themselves with the world knitwear techniques and are introduced to flat bed knitting machines, as well as technical instruments and methods of knitting. Through a series of exercises, students will be able to read and translate pattern schemes, develop ideas into patterns, make samples, and be able to construct a basic machine-knitted garment. Additionally, students will analyze fashion trends in knitwear and learn technical aspects of different yarn types, materials, structure in order to explore tradition and innovation while strengthening an experimental attitude.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDLD370 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion major, Junior standing. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course focuses on the process of taking design from concept to reality, with an emphasis on production, pricing and distribution. It will provide the basics of supply chain management and provide a framework for understanding how it can be adapted to best support an individual design concept. Lessons will be complemented by guest presentations by local designers and other influential industry professionals. Students will create a supply chain plan to support successfully bringing their own design concepts to market.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDSC315 | Section: III | Open
This hands-on course will take students from the rudimentary skills and techniques necessary both in terms of mechanized and hand techniques to allow for the creation of simple cotton garments. In the second level the focus will shift to complex design strategies and construction which are most frequently employed as industry standards.


Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDSC380 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Sewing and Construction Techniques I
This hands-on course will take students from the rudimentary skills and techniques necessary both in terms of mechanized and hand techniques to allow for the creation of simple cotton garments. In the second level the focus will shift to complex design strategies and construction which are most frequently employed as industry standards.


Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF360 | Section: I | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF365 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Resume Required
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smallerscale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM300 | Section: II | Open
Through this course, students explore and apply various forecast research methods in preparation for developing, planning, purchasing, or merchandising apparel lines and collections. Using the case studies, market and trend research is evaluated to identify opportunities for growth and profitability in a fashion business. By applying consumer, aesthetic and quantitative information, students develop value-added apparel/textile strategies for products and product lines with merchandising campaigns for diverse targets. The outcome of the course will focus on understanding the relationship of forecasting and product line development. Students will be exposed to analytical techniques to acquire quantitative elements through marketing theories that explain fashion dynamics that occur in apparel and retail.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM360 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMMC285 | Section: I | Open
The course provides a comprehensive look at the merchandising environment including the functions and objectives of the merchandising team and the principles and techniques of today's buyers, planners, product developers, and account executives. Students will gain an understanding on procedures of how to plan, select, price, and sell fashion goods. Product development, sourcing, and production are an integral part of the course. The course will also address the analysis of wholesale and apparel management practices of the fashion marketing industry with a specific focus on planning, developing, and presenting product lines for identified target markets. The course will also address the analysis of the issues with a specific focus on the Italian industry through locally based case studies.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAP325 | Section: II | Open
The course will develop a comparative study of art as an expression of human experience from the development of the paradigms of beauty and aesthetics developed during the Renaissance to the contemporary perception of beauty. The course will include major artists and influences in terms of styles and movements. The course will feature a contrast between the "two cities" within the city that embody these diverse ways to convey art and beauty as an experiential pathway for understanding the evolution of artistic language and its possible directions in the future.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Film Photography | Course #: FAFPFP360 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: At least one film photography course and an understanding of film processing/printing, camera reciprocity, and darkroom chemistry. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is both a technical and a creative course intended for intermediate / advanced film photography students. Using medium format and large format cameras, students will choose a format size to complete a singular photography project. Students will learn advanced and unique black and white processing/printing by studying development time matrixes, studio lighting, and large format printing. Visual assignments and readings will be used to accompany the specific learning techniques. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: At least one film photography course and an understanding of film processing/printing, camera reciprocity, and darkroom chemistry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDWC180 | Section: II | Open
This foundation course will explore methods, techniques and various aspects of watercolor painting. The unique qualities of watercolor will be explored through direct observation exercises, demonstrations and individual projects. Watercolor techniques will be explored, including developing drawings to form strong compositions, capturing the effects of light, color-mixing and washes. Students will develop their painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities to artistic expression in watercolor medium. The class format consists of studio work with lectures, examples, demonstrations, and individual as well as group critiques. Reading and homework assignments are coordinated with the studio work.
Contact Hours: 45

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPAC560 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Chocolate Artistry or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The course focuses on the application of advanced techniques to chocolate tempering, molding and modeling. The previously learned skills will be fundamental to prepare and decorate artistic pralines and pieces for showcase using airbrush coloring, plastic chocolate, flavors and texture contrasts. Emphasis will be placed on the creation of molded chocolate pieces starting from the project to the execution and assembly. 
This course will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the tools, techniques and styles used in chocolate decoration and embellishments. The course focuses on chocolate molding and modeling, and on artistic praline construction for pastry shop applications. The course is open to students with a knowledge of basic chocolate processing techniques. Prerequisites: Chocolate Artistry or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBC310 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields.
Students will study the history and background of various national and regional cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical cakes, variations from classical methods, and customer-driven deviations from traditional preparations. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings, and glazes, with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skill execution for Italian cakes. Special attention will be paid to advanced creaming methods (separated creaming methods, creaming without leavening agents) and combination methods. Piping skills are practiced.


Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBT320 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Baking techniques introduces the functions of baking ingredients (such as yeast, flour, and shortening), mixing methods for dough's, fermentation techniques, heat transfer methods. Focus on basic elements such as pastry dough, sponge cake, pachoux, puff pastry, plunder, danesi, croissant, egg/butter based basic creams, production and conservation of fruit conserves and meringues. In this course, students taste and test the products they create as well as complete a research assignment.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPCA450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course introduces the principles involved in tempering chocolate, creating chocolate sculptures, forming simple centerpieces, and preparing chocolates and other confections with soft, hard, and liquid centers. Students learn to use traditional and contemporary production methods in creating confections both by hand and with special equipment. Efficient methods to increase productivity in this highly specialized field will be highlighted.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPCC360 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of the traditional methods of producing cookies and petit fours. The course will explore the preparation and design of unfilled and filled cookies and mignardises. Topics covered include the creaming method, depositing cookies (sliced, dropped, spritz, rolled, and bar), as well as methods of mixing, shaping, baking, filling, finishing, storing, packaging, pricing, and distributing cookies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPDS480 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
The aim of the course is to give students the fundamentals of
dessert presentation. Starting from fruit cutting skills, students will experience a variety of decoration techniques to be applied to mignons, single portion desserts, and tortes. Glazes and gelaces, buttercream, whipped cream, icings, and chocolate and caramel decorations will be explained and practiced to gain confidence with related techniques. Students will experience both classic and contemporary decoration methods ranging from piping skills to the application of specific equipment for royal-icing writing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute decorating and styling techniques and to develop their own personal plating style.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPIC440 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course introduces students to classically applied mediums used in
display work and decoration. Students will learn to execute specific
designs in pastillage, rolled fondant, gum paste, and royal icing, as well
as with poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Production, storing of all types
of candied fruits and Italian mostarda. Production and storing of jams
and conserves, fruit jellies, Italian croccante, sugar fondant, almond
paste.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPIC620 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques and Dessert Styling, or equivalent.
From East to West, primitive to progressive, most common to most avant-garde, cakes are good for the soul. They draw people together, enliven celebrations, and embody the rituals and histories of cultures around the world. This course will focus on the cultural background of famous classic cakes in order for students to understand the origin and the history behind famous international representative creations. Emphasis will be placed in the analysis of the area of origin of each cake in order to find connections between ingredients, preparation techniques and the final creation.
Students will join this journey among different traditions, stories, ingredients and folklore, learning dedicated skills for the preparation of international classics.
 Pavlova, Sacher Torte, Baklava, Black Forest Cake, original NY Cheesecake, and the Tres Leches cake are only some of the creations that will be experienced during this trip among traditions. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques and Dessert Styling, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPI600 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course offers students the opportunity of a professional approach to Italian gelato production and a comparison with ice cream, sorbets, sherbets and other churned frozen desserts. The evolution of gelato will be explained to understand the fundamental steps of its development. The difference between ice cream and gelato artigianale will be fully covered in order to give students a sound understanding of the variety of offers commonly found in the market. The structure of the worldwide famous frozen dessert will be analyzed in detail focusing on major and minor ingredients and how they are responsible for the final texture and flavor. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of production and serving temperatures, gelato service and exposition as well as the different balancing formulas related to a variety of suitable ingredients. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to prepare gelato using exclusively fresh, genuine and natural ingredients. Gelato artigianale will be produced starting from different bases, with the application of a variety of ingredients, following the Italian way of production. Attention will be given to gelato production for special dietary requirements, gelato gourmet interpretations, sorbets and original sicilian granita production. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPP506 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Apicius Baking and Pastry Level 2 coursework or equivalent.
This course explores stimulating applications of both classic and contemporary pastry techniques to pastry shop and la carte restaurant production. The program focuses on the following main topics: the use of freezing temperatures through a survey of the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures and ingredients are balanced and play a fundamental role, handling fresh and seasonal fruits in pastry production, and the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create products with unexpectedly smooth textures, a wide variety of gels and contemporary mousses, and pastry applications of molecular gastronomy. Through this experience, students will understand the role of specific ingredients in ice production in order to serve frozen desserts with a perfect balance between texture and temperature. The course will address professional techniques of pastry arts classics such as semifreddo, bomba gelato, parfait, and bon bons. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, such as the stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. The course offers a full immersion in pastry lab production with an important focus on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow pastry chefs to develop their creativity and reach new unexpected results. Prerequisites: Apicius Baking and Pastry Level 2 coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPS350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
A study of classical desserts, French, Italian and international pastries, hot and cold desserts. Emphasis on advanced techniques, as well as the safe and sanitary handling of equipment and food supplies. Emphasis will be placed on the production of high quality, handcrafted desserts for retail, commercial and food service bakeries.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPS355 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course is a study of bakery operations and management as
practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the baking industry. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory
in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPT470 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
This course is the advanced phase of Baking Technique courses. Students will experience the application of previously learned foundations to a variety of pastry products such as pie doughs, baked custards, and advanced spongecake recipes. The course introduces a wide range of methods that will be combined for the creation of laminated doughs, souffles, Bavarian mousses, and pate a bombe mousses. Students will learn how to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPT475 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
This course introduces non-yeast, laminated dough's and the
preparation of pastry products using a variety of methods-lamination, blending, creaming, foaming, and thickening. Students will combine these methods in new products, to create savory items and frozen desserts, and to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. The fundamentals of heat transfer as applied to pastries in the preparation of creams, custards, souffles, butter creams, meringues, and flavored whipped creams will also be studied. Students will taste and test the products created and will complete a research assignment.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPSB350 | Section: II | Open
Since ancient times bread has had a significance that goes beyond mere sustenance. Almost every society in the world eats bread in some form and bread has always been considered a symbol of life for all mankind. Bread celebrates life and plays a leading role in traditional celebrations and festivities. This course focuses on traditional Italian specialty breads, made with special, or alternative flours, shaped by local folklore and passed down from generation to generation like the most precious gift.
Students will be introduced to natural yeast production and learn how to keep the yeast alive and strengthen it for better leavening as well as the nutritional advantages and flavor development thanks to its use.
The course offers a complete survey of traditional specialty breads, specialty flatbreads, sweet breads and rolls with an emphasis on old grain flour, alternative flours and local folklore. In addition to this students will be introduced to special diet baking through lessons on gluten free bread and complements.
A special focus is dedicated to Italy's most famous baked product, pizza: through an in-depth analysis pizza will be explained and enjoyed in all its most popular variations.








Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPSL500 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course focuses on the production of long shelf-life handcrafted baked products, a branch of traditional pastry art that is unfortunately a prerogative of industrial food production today. Students will learn how to prepare artisan travel cakes and snacks to go thanks to an in-depth study of the role of single ingredients and their balancing. 
Sugars, fats, mixing methods, cooking temperatures and food safety will be analyzed from the perspective of their impact on the final product shelf-life.
An emphasis will be put on the role of water and hydration in baked products and how water influences the textural properties during storage.
The course also includes the study of the calculation of free water in cakes, together with storage and preservation environment management and notions of food contamination and oxidation.
Students will learn how to prepare traditional and contemporary travel cakes. Students will also learn artisan methods to reproduce famous Italian packaged snacks.
 This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPWC570 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques and Dessert Styling, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Students will learn the history and significance of wedding cakes and diverse wedding cake styles.The course will focus on important wedding
cake approaches and the techniques needed to create wedding and specialty cakes. Emphasis is placed on developing skills related to decorative ornaments using chocolate, marzipan, sugar, pastillage, and royal icing. Through this course, students will understand the importance of precision and dedication in wedding cake production, and how to use edible materials to create classic, contemporary, and themed decorated cakes. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAMD515 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts majors only. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The planning and organization of a menu is one of the keys for the success of food service establishments. Starting from the consideration that food is strongly related to the social and cultural background, the course analyzes the gastronomic and nutritional trends of the last decades and how they have impacted food production, at any level. Food nutritional facts, food allergies and intolerances, the variety of eating habits are slowly changing foodservice approach when planning a menu.
The course explores the history of menus and their development and offers students an overview of a variety of menus commonly offered. 
The goal of the course is to analyze all factors that contribute to the success of a good menu planning, starting from the relationship between the menu and marketing and continuing through the many steps that are necessary to provide an accurate, complete and functional work. Advertising, market search, suppliers and products search, cost and labor control will be fully covered and students will learn how staff, equipment, and facility can impact a menu.
Emphasis will be placed on contemporary nutritional habits and on patrons expectations when eating out. Students will be involved in the comparison of local foodservice establishments menus with an analysis of the nutritional balance of their dishes.

 Prerequisites: Culinary Arts majors only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCANC505 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis.
Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts.
Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC335 | Section: I | Open
This course is the first out of three about Professional Cooking and its aim is to introduce students to culinary fundamentals.
The structure of the classical kitchen will be compared to the contemporary one in order to understand the differences in the organization of the brigade. The role of the Chef will be explained and discussed.
Tools and equipment use, weights, measures and recipe conversion will be explained and practiced.
 This course will provide the first basic information about seasonings and flavorings and the application of herbs and spices in the kitchen.
 Students will approach cooking thanks to a careful analysis of knife skills, principles of cooking and basic cooking techniques, that include eggs, vegetables, pasta and meat cookery. Special emphasis will be placed on methods and procedures rather than on the complete preparation of finished dishes. A special focus will be put on kitchen cleaning, sanitation, maintenance and personal safety. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC506 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
The course is divided into three phases and explores stimulating applications of contemporary cuisine. Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Phase 1, Temperature Application: This phase explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. Phase 2, Gels and Thickening Agents: This phase examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested. Phase 3, Gases and Air-Based Preparations: This phase focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths. Prerequisites: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
1.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC507 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Course content explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. Prerequisites: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC508 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Course content examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested. Prerequisites: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC509 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Course content focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths. Prerequisites: Apicius Culinary Arts Level 3 coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 15
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCATF340 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts majors or students who have taken previous culinary arts coursework.
This course focuses on the preparation of dishes that distinguish traditional Italian cuisine. Students will learn how to use different ingredients to prepare representative Italian dishes. The fundamentals of cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilized in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered; these concepts will prepare students continuing on to the intermediate and advanced sections of this course (II + III). Notions of the history of these dishes will also be discussed as students prepare the various recipes.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCATF440 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food I or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts Majors.
This course continues to explore the tradition of Italian food through representative recipes. Emphasis will be given to more elaborate dishes, including the cleaning and preparation of shellfish, fresh pasta, food combination's, feast foods and banquets.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAVC504 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The last 40 years of food service have been characterized by a slow yet constant development of nutritional awareness and a more informed approach to food. The aim of the course is not only to offer students techniques for a healthier approach to cooking: this course will focus on cooking techniques that can be applied in order to reduce fat consumption and at same time become the emblems of contemporary cuisine. Flavor-extraction methods, flavoring methods, pressure cooking and sous vide cooking, marinades and brines and the use of alternative fats are nowadays the base of contemporary Chefs' creations: students will learn how these techniques can be used to develop a fine dining cuisine that can be healthier yet not necessarily health-fanatic. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNFW380 | Section: IV | Open
Wellness is the search for enhanced quality of life, personal and potential growth, through the choice of positive lifestyle behaviors and attitudes. Health can be improved on a daily basis by taking responsibility for our own well being.
This course will teach students how our state of wellness is deeply influenced by a variety of factors including nutrition, physical activity, stress-coping methods, good relationships, and career success. Emphasis will be placed on the benefits of a constant and planned physical activity and on the understanding how each of these benefits is important to long-term health.
The course provides students with the basic knowledge of primary (cardiorespiratory ability, muscular ability, flexibility, and body composition) and secondary (balance, coordination, agility, reaction time, speed, power, mental capability) components of fitness as well as the basics of anatomy. The course will teach students how to combine a targeted nutrition and physical activity for the pursue of good health as well as develop physical skills that also enhance the psychological and emotional well being. Emphasis will be placed on the differences between health-related fitness and skill-related fitness. 
The course includes physical activity sessions focused on general physical wellness.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNIN305 | Section: IV | Open
This course introduces students to the basic nutrition concepts such as calories, nutrient density and dietary reference intake. Through the course the characteristics and the role of the basic nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals) will be closely examined and different food combinations analyzed and discussed. The concept of food pyramid will be extensively analyzed and different food pyramids and their cultural and scientific backgrounds compared: the Mediterranean, the USDA, the traditional Latin American, the Asian and the Vegetarian. Menu composition and meal planning will be discussed form the nutritionist's point of view.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNSC510 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts coursework or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
After the first appearance of molecular gastronomy in the latter half of the 20th century, the approach of chefs towards food has dramatically changed. This science of cooking course is aimed at non-science majors who wish to gain knowledge of the basic science behind cooking to both improve methods of cooking and avoid common pitfalls. Students will acquire the concepts behind basic techniques that aid innovation and creative impulse in the field of gastronomy. The course will combine both theory and practice based on contemporary scientific knowledge.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNTF507 | Section: II | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our
senses as they interact with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order define the tools to examine flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding for appreciation. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: 1 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FWWCTW262 | Section: II | Open
The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of Tuscan wine typologies focusing particularly on a presentation of the most important wine growing areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be offered and a selection of Tuscan wines will be studied in terms of their characteristics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWA440 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Wine appreciation I or equivalent.
This course has been designed to provide students with an advanced working knowledge of wine appreciation. Emphasis is placed on studying the most important Italian grape varieties through out the Italian territory and to learn how to assess and to evaluate the wine typologies deriving from different grapes and soils. Particular importance is given to comparative wine tasting, focusing on the different characteristics of wines coming from different regions. The course gives a complete overview of the most important Italian wine areas.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWF380 | Section: IV | Open
This course presents, explains and analyzes the role of France as a reference model in the wine world. Course topics cover the historical and cultural origins of winemaking in France, the main native grape varieties as well as the major French wine production areas: Champagne, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Alsace, Loire Valley, Provence and more, with detailed studies on wine characteristics according to the place of production. Students will be guided, also through wine tastings, throughout the french territory to gain an in-depth understanding the concepts of Terroir, Cru and the influence of France on international viticulture and wine styles.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWW360 | Section: I | Open
This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the Old World as France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Hungary, Greece, Slovenia and of course Italy. Students will be guided across Europe to discover the principal wine areas and native grape varieties, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage and winemaking tradition that belong to each country. Course topics include the different appellation systems, soil characteristics, and basics of winemaking process. The course also offers an introduction to wine tasting in order to better understand the original features of the wines from each country.
Contact Hours: 45

Global Studies

3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSHW210 | Section: II | Open
The course focuses on individual skills to succeed in social and personal
life: it provides an introduction to the science of happiness, integrating
findings from positive psychology, behavioral genetics, neurosciences
and behavioral economics. The course also offers a set of tools and
techniques to transform problems into learning and to develop and
apply strategies and skills that promote an all-round progress in a
person's psychological, physical and social life.
Contact Hours: 45

Hospitality

3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTCE380 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The rapidly growing industry of corporate event production encompasses a vast collection of event types. Corporate events require individuals to be professionally trained and capable to navigate through the process of designing a successful event. The aim of this course is to provide students with the strategies and approaches to developing successful corporate meetings and conferences. Prerequisites: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHR350 | Section: III | Open
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for people whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional Human Resources. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIE200 | Section: II | Open
The course will provide students with a solid grounding of coordination of events and entertainment. The class will focus on the historical evolution, organizational standards and career paths in the field of event management. The lessons will also address theory elements concerning the foundations of strategic planning, financial management, human resources management and event sponsorship. Students will be involved in hands-on projects developed by the schools event manager in order to experience directly many tasks related to the planning and carrying out of events.
This class features a project at Ganzo for Wednesday AperiGanzo. Students will be involved in Wednesday evening shifts as a part of class.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIH300 | Section: I | Open

Provides a fundamental overview of the hospitality industry and its main segments: hotel, restaurant, management services, and clubs. The operational sectors of the industry as well as managerial components and skills will be explored. All of the following topics will be examined: development of tourism; demand for travel, examination of food and beverages industry, associations and organizations related to hospitality as a sub-segment of the tourism industry. Career opportunities in the
hospitality industry will be discussed and students will be encouraged to develop their own career plan.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIM450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Hospitality or equivalent.
This course will consider how food and wine tourism is implemented in Italy. The regional aspect of the country, its rich cultural variety, and how the tourism revolving its cuisine and wine are interpreted in sustainable forms will be analyzed. Students will explore the unique gastronomy, products, and producers of specific Italian regions in order to understand the role of territories and local cultures in Italian food and wine tourism. The practices, organization, management, and implementation of these forms of tourism will be studied along with territorial and cultural aspects to discover how gastronomic tourism expresses the soul of a place and can generate new or renewed interest in geographic areas of Italy
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTOB470 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Human Resources Management or equivalent
The course is designed to assist students in making sound decisions in the hospitality industry by heightening their sensibility to the organizational parameters that influence their decisions. Furthermore students will analyze computer systems and their applications within the hotel industry. All computer applications are examined, from reservations to the back office through a series of assignments and projects.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTSE410 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent. This class features a project at Ganzo for Thursday Themed Dinners. Students will be involved in Thursday evening shifts as a part of class.
This course will examine all aspects of special event management. Design, financing, budgeting, leadership and integrated marketing will be studied. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving their effectiveness and profit ability when managing special events, which demands competence in the are as of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, and staffing.


Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTSE415 | Section: I | Open
This course examines all aspects of special event management.
A comprehensive study of the Special events industry focused on emphasizing the dynamics of the creative process critical to these events. Special events include but are not limited to, weddings, ceremonies and celebration, life cycle events and fairs and festivals. Through the event planning process special events will be examined from a logistical, and financial perspective. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving their effectiveness and profitability when managing special events, which demands competence in the areas of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, staffing, and accounting. Special attention is given to the use of new online tools and apps for the organization of events as well as the most important and common new social media in order to more effectively promote events. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.




Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PSELSM331 | Section: I | Open
This course is a study of bakery operations and management
as practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined
for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain
familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the
baking industry.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers
as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential
learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step
by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to
student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model
allows students to benefi t from an all-encompassing educational experience
based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive
operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLAV340 | Section: III | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with the main concepts and methods of valuing real estate. Students will explore the property valuation profession, gaining knowledge of the five traditional methods of valuation and undertaking their own valuation calculations. This course also focuses on ROI (return on investment) analysis for real estate investments for tourism purposes. Students will also become familiar with the different methods of measurement and valuation standards
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBCC532 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Hospitality Accounting, Restaurant Management or equivalent. Unofficial Transcript submission required.
Course develops skills in scheduling and controlling costs in managed projects that present the challenges of time, human resources, materials, budget, project specifications, and deadlines. The concept of financial planning for businesses and organizations, including a special emphasis on hospitality structures, asks students to consider the compilation of budgets, identifying/forecasting potential problems to avoid profit loss, flexible vs. static budgets to control costs, and types of cost control analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBCS470 | Section: III | Open
This course will enable candidates to gain a deep knowledge and
qualification relating directly to the catering environment. the course
will enhance their personal growth and development, enabling them to
undertake their role with greater confidence. all organizational, logistic
and marketing aspects of the catering industry will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBOM400 | Section: I | Open
This course introduces one of the fundamental areas of study in the
hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of
food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets,
effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles.
Cost calculations, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget
forecasting, labor costs, service payment systems, and other topic specific
areas will be covered.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBOM405 | Section: I | Open
This course introduces one of the fundamental areas of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculations, menu planning, storage, and receiving.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBSM330 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: This course features an Experiential Learning project with shifts at Fedora and Ganzo
The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBSM331 | Section: I | Open
The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELOM405 | Section: I | Open
This course introduces a fundamental area of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, and the effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculation, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget forecasting,
labor costs, service payment systems, and other topic-specific areas will be
covered.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community.
In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved
in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local
population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as
well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who
track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor
and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative.
This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real
enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELPS355 | Section: I | Open
This course is a study of bakery operations and management
as practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the baking industry.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMSM300 | Section: IV | Open
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMSO335 | Section: I | Open
This course provides a strong foundation of knowledge for anyone interested in learning about the spa community. Students taking this course will develop an understanding of the main skills required to manage and operate a profitable spa in the multifaceted spa industry. They will explore industry evolution from ancient civilizations to new frontiers of convergence that integrates spas, medicine, healthcare, tourism, and hospitality. A comprehensive overview of spa operations will be provided with an emphasis on current business models and perspectives on maximizing business success. Students will learn all aspects of the successful day-to-day operation of a spa as well as business strategies to employ for sustained growth and profitability in this constantly evolving industry. In-class discussion will focus on definition and market segmentation of spa categories including day, resort, medical, destination, hospital, and lifestyle management programs. Topics include: conceptual skills in management, operations, finance, human resources, marketing, products, treatments, and equipment from initial design and business planning process to opening a spa and managing operations and positioning for managed future growth. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMSO340 | Section: I | Open
This course provides a strong foundation of knowledge for anyone interested in learning about the spa community. Students taking this course will develop an understanding of the main skills required to manage and operate a profitable spa in the multifaceted spa industry. They will explore industry evolution from ancient civilizations to new frontiers of convergence that integrates spas, medicine, healthcare, tourism, and hospitality. A comprehensive overview of spa operations will be provided with an emphasis on current business models and perspectives on maximizing business success. Students will learn all aspects of the successful day-to-day operation of a spa as well as business strategies to employ for sustained growth and profitability in this constantly evolving industry. In-class discussion will focus on definition and market segmentation of spa categories including day, resort, medical, destination, hospital, and lifestyle management programs. Topics include: conceptual skills in management, operations, finance, human resources, marketing, products, treatments, and equipment from initial design and business planning process to opening a spa and managing operations and positioning for managed future growth. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMST300 | Section: II | Open
Hydrotherapy, spa treatments and body treatments are non-medical procedures fundamental in the core business process of spas: healing therapies and treatments. As this course is designed to serve as an introduction to spa treatments, students will be given a comprehensive overview of treatment philosophy and physiology. Students taking this course will examine the benefits and contraindications of all spa therapies, treatments, and techniques. A strong emphasis will be placed upon hydrotherapy, the physical properties of water, the use of water in spa therapy, balneotherapy, thalassotherapy mineral springs, bathing, soaking, hot tubs, Finnish sauna, hammam, showers, hoses and other water concepts. To ensure students are prepared to properly identify the body-mind connection, they will learn about major human body systems, such as muscles, joints, and bones, the nervous system, the circulatory system, the cardiovascular system, and skin and nail structure. Students will also learn to meet spa industry service standards and will be able to follow sanitation and infection prevention and control guidelines, in order to comply with industry health and safety regulations.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability

3.0 Credits
Interior and Industrial Design | Course #: IDIDCD280 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Technical Drawings and CAD or equivalent
In this course students will learn the concepts and techniques of
creating, viewing and manipulating 3D models. Through the generation of drawings and perspectives, students develop an in-depth understanding of the modeling and rendering techniques used for creating objects, furniture and interior spaces.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDDT300 | Section: II | Open
Design thinking refers to creative strategies designers use during the process of designing. Focused on listening, user empathy, whole-brain thinking, collaboration, and experimentation, design thinking can be applied within any team and in any field, from architecture and design to healthcare and product development. This course applies design thinking methodology to everyday problems and provides students with the tools they need to become innovative thinkers. Envisioned as a collaborative lab, this course fosters the integration of research, problem-forming and problem-solving, aesthetics, technology, prototyping, and publishing, with a strong focus on user's needs. Several tools to help students understand design thinking as a problem-solving approach are introduced throughout the course. Case-studies from different organizations that used design thinking to uncover compelling solutions are used to support instruction. This course delves into the fundamentals of th0is creative approach by immersing students in dynamic discussions, relevant readings, and team exercises. Throughout the course, students learn how to empathize with the needs and motivations of the end users, discover new ideas for solving a problem and how to apply strategies and methodologies drawn from a wider range of creative design practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDPD315 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Interior Design or Introduction to Industrial Design.
In this course students develop an understanding of the design of three-dimensional objects, which have a specialized function - in, for example, the domestic or hospitality spheres - and medium-low complexity. During the course students are introduced to the world of products for interiors in which Italy is a market leader and will study examples of well-known designers and their different styles. students develop their projects through research, realize the prototypes and analyze the production costs.



Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDPF315 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to 3D Printing and Fabrication or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
In this advanced 3D and Fabrication course, students will learn about the practical differences between Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining and 3D Printing and how to select the right technology for different manufacturing needs, volumes, and materials. This course will allow students to master the fundamentals of CNC operations providing learners with a thorough knowledge of CNC principles and machine structures, manufacture planning, manual part programming and editing. Investigation of materials, prototyping and testing, physical mock-ups and the application of new fabrication processes is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: Introduction to 3D Printing and Fabrication or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDRD300 | Section: III | Open
This course is aimed at two different audiences. Design students who want to learn to build simple interactive prototypes to illustrate and study their ideas. Research-oriented students, who want to develop skills needed in design research, as well as the ability to illustrate their ideas with simple interactive prototypes, and an ability to develop those ideas through user-centered methods. In this course, students will learn how to design and prototype user interfaces to address the users and tasks identified in research. Through a series of lectures and exercises, students will learn and practice paper techniques and other low-fidelity prototyping techniques; they will learn and apply principles from graphic design, including design patterns; they will learn to write a design rationale; and how to design for specific populations and situations, including principles and practices of accessible design.
Contact Hours: 45

Italian Studies and Linguistics

3.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI200 | Open
Pre-requisite:
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITIB101 | Section: I | Open
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense, Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII201 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII201 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII250 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of subjunctive and all four tenses.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII250 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of subjunctive and all four tenses.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII250 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of subjunctive and all four tenses.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII280 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex grammar structures to express personal opinions and preferences. This level enables students to enter unprepared into conversation on topics with which they are familiar, which are of personal interest or which pertain to everyday life (i.e. family, hobbies, work, travel, and current events). During this course, students will develop skills which will allow them to narrate a story, relate the plot of a book or film or write correctly on topics which are familiar or are of personal interest. After taking this course, students will have developed a good understanding of Subjunctive and will be able to judge when to use Indicative, Subjunctive or conditional. Students will also learn more complex forms of verbs like the Passive form.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII280 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex grammar structures to express personal opinions and preferences. This level enables students to enter unprepared into conversation on topics with which they are familiar, which are of personal interest or which pertain to everyday life (i.e. family, hobbies, work, travel, and current events). During this course, students will develop skills which will allow them to narrate a story, relate the plot of a book or film or write correctly on topics which are familiar or are of personal interest. After taking this course, students will have developed a good understanding of Subjunctive and will be able to judge when to use Indicative, Subjunctive or conditional. Students will also learn more complex forms of verbs like the Passive form.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII280 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex grammar structures to express personal opinions and preferences. This level enables students to enter unprepared into conversation on topics with which they are familiar, which are of personal interest or which pertain to everyday life (i.e. family, hobbies, work, travel, and current events). During this course, students will develop skills which will allow them to narrate a story, relate the plot of a book or film or write correctly on topics which are familiar or are of personal interest. After taking this course, students will have developed a good understanding of Subjunctive and will be able to judge when to use Indicative, Subjunctive or conditional. Students will also learn more complex forms of verbs like the Passive form.
Contact Hours: 45

Journalism, Communication, and Publishing

3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CPJLPJ320 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.
During this two-pronged course, students will focus on: 1) the history and study of photojournalism from its genesis/inception to today and 2) assignments/projects that are journalistic newsworthy (events, human interest, artistic/cultural, sports, feature, and portrait). Students will emulate what it is like to be a newspaper photographer and learn storytelling images of the everyday events that occur in life. Through lectures and discussions students will also address contemporary issues such as: the cultural, social, and political influence of images and photojournalism in society as well as ethics and legal issues in photojournalism. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images.This course is recommended for Communications, Journalism, and Social Sciences students.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPPUFE300 | Section: I | Open
This course examines the fundamental aspects of the publishing industry with an emphasis on book publishing. Issues such as editorial brainstorming and manuscript selection, layout processes, production, interior and exterior design, marketing, and financial factors are explored on a hands on level with examples and collaborations drawn from ongoing publication projects. the emphasis on editing focuses on evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copy cutting, editing, rewriting, proofreading and writing captions, titles and subtitles.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPPUFE305 | Section: I | Open
This course examines the fundamental aspects of the publishing industry with an emphasis on book publishing. Issues such as editorial brainstorming and manuscript selection, layout processes, production, interior and exterior design, marketing, and financial factors are explored on a hands-on level with examples and collaborations drawn from ongoing publication projects. The emphasis on editing focuses on evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copy cutting, editing, rewriting, proofreading and writing captions, titles and subtitles. Critiquing and creating titles and subtitles is also covered. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPPULM330 | Section: III | Open
The first of a two part series on magazine production, lifestyle Magazine I gives students a professional magazine production experience in an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production and distribution of a full color lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. the magazine and its semester format will represent the students approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. this project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times.
Contact Hours: 45

Liberal Arts

3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHAP325 | Section: II | Open
The course will develop a comparative study of art as an expression of human experience from the development of the paradigms of beauty and aesthetics developed during the Renaissance to the contemporary perception of beauty. The course will include major artists and influences in terms of styles and movements. The course will feature a contrast between the "two cities" within the city that embody these diverse ways to convey art and beauty as an experiential pathway for understanding the evolution of artistic language and its possible directions in the future.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHTC370 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art History
This course examines major philosophies and concepts that have contributed to the discussion of art theory, aesthetic discourse, and
contemporary criticism. Reading and analyzing various texts from antiquity to the present, students will explore the underlying questions and meanings of art and how they interact or conflict throughout the development of Western thought. The aim of this course is to equip the student with a foundation in art theory in order to develop an informed critical approach. Texts covered in class will include writings by philosophers, critics, and artists such as Plato, Alberti, Kant, Benjamin, Greenberg, Barthes, Baudrillard, Lippard, and Trin T. Minha.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition and Creative Writing | Course #: LACWCW300 | Section: IV | Open
This is an introduction to fiction writing. It covers the technical elements of fiction writing through in-class writing exercises that develop dialogue, voice, plot, image, character development, point of view, scene, structure and other prose skills. The in-class work will be augmented with homework assignments which students will use in writing larger pieces of fiction. Students will learn to critique work from a writer's perspective.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition and Creative Writing | Course #: LACWWF310 | Section: I | Open
This course introduces writing techniques in the fashion industry. Topics bridge the gap between core writing classes and higher-level fashion courses concentrating on merchandising and promotion by presenting writing strategies intended for the different writing styles required in the industry. Students will learn the methods of effective writing for fashion reports and forecasts, fashion show scripts, public relations, catalog, direct mail, trade and consumer magazines, and online channels. Case studies illustrate examples of effective and ineffective writing.
Contact Hours: 45

Life Studies / Human Services

3.0 Credits
Health Humanities | Course #: LSHHHW210 | Section: II | Open
This course focuses on individual skills to succeed in social and personal life. It provides an introduction to the science of happiness, integrating findings from positive psychology, behavioral genetics, neurosciences, and behavioral economics. The course offers a set of tools and techniques to transform problems into learning opportunities and to develop and apply strategies and skills that promote overall progress in a person's psychological, physical, and social well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOPF280 | Section: IV | Open
This course addresses significant moments in the timeline of Italian fashion from its historic origins to the present day. While exploring the art and business of Italian fashion design, students will encounter influential individuals, style and industry-changing happenings, and the places that hosted them. Designers and creative figures, industry players and companies, hallmark fashion shows, and significant Italian locations are amongst the case studies covered. Field visits and guest lectures are an essential component of this course.
Contact Hours: 45

Professional Studies and Experiential Learning

6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: IDPDPD320 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Interior Design or Introduction to Industrial Design.
This course fosters an understanding of the design of three-dimensional objects that have a specialized function in domestic or hospitality contexts and a low-medium complexity. During the course, students are introduced to the world of products for interiors in which Italy is a market leader. Case studies of well-known designers and their different styles will be examined. Students develop their projects through research, create prototypes, and analyze production costs. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELFD375 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion Design Studio I or equivalent.
This course represents the advanced level exploration of fashion design studio topic. The course focuses on the study of the fashion industry with emphasis on design and construction. Students develop their design collections by exploring and analyzing the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process focusing on economic, and cultural contents. Concepts are applied with hands-on learning experiences as students study, textiles, fashion design, apparel construction, consumer behavior, products, and materials of the fashion industry. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Fashion Design Studio I or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELFE305 | Section: I | Open
This course examines the fundamental aspects of the publishing industry with an emphasis on book publishing. Issues such as editorial brainstorming and manuscript selection, layout processes, production, interior and exterior design, marketing, and financial factors are explored on a hands-on level with examples and collaborations drawn from ongoing publication projects. The emphasis on editing focuses on evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copy cutting, editing, rewriting, proofreading and writing captions, titles and subtitles. Critiquing and creating titles and subtitles is also covered. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELPC335 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only
This course will introduce students to cooking fundamentals and is the first of a three-series course on Professional Cooking. Students will learn classic and basic techniques and their applications. Special emphasis will be placed on methods and procedures as well as sanitation and hygiene. The aim of the course is to provide students with solid foundations in terms of both knowledge and practice for a better understanding of the basic skills necessary for more advanced courses. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).�CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELPD320 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Product Design or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
With the advance of technological innovation and the increased availability of products, it has become easier to notice when bad product design happens. But what makes a design good or bad? This advanced course in product design allows students to answer such a question by exploring this still-evolving discipline from a number of perspectives. The course objective is for students to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to work professionally as a product designer. Students are invited to independently explore the problem area, define relevant design problems and plan the further design work. During the course, students build on previously acquired knowledge relative to the design process and apply their skills by undertaking real-world product design problem-solving projects. As part of the course assessment, students are expected to account for the design process, argue for relevant facts, social context and a user focus to justify the methods, techniques and tools used to perform, explain and visualize the process and the result. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Introduction to Product Design or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELPM335 | Section: I | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge of professional property management. Students will become familiar with the different management methods, such as ownership and subleases, as well as the new specific insurance practices for the tourist rental market. This course focuses on major functions of property managers, and details specific practices and problems in managing a variety of properties, such as residential, retail and industrial ones. Students will also learn how to manage maintenance, construction, insurance, and relations with tenants. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELPT475 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques or equivalent. Culinary Arts & Baking and Pastry Majors only.
This course introduces non-yeast, laminated doughs, and the preparation of pastry products using a variety of methods-lamination, blending, creaming, foaming, and thickening. Students will combine these methods in new products, to create savory items and frozen desserts, and use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. The fundamentals of heat transfer as applied to pastries in the preparation of creams, custards, souffles, butter creams, meringues, and flavored whipped creams will also be studied. Students will taste and test the products created and will complete a research assignment.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELRS325 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on exposure to sales and retail through an understanding of the strategies related to the supply chain, competitors, suppliers, and customers. Coursework will provide students with the knowledge of the tools and decisions applied by international and Italian companies to maintain clientele loyalty. The managerial component of the course will also give students an understanding of basic management methods in terms of product flow, marketing tools, and geography-specific analysis in retail marketing. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELSE415 | Section: I | Open
This course examines all aspects of special event management and provides a comprehensive study of the special events industry focused on emphasizing the dynamics of the creative process critical to these events. Special events include but are not limited to business events, weddings, ceremonies, celebrations, life cycle events, fairs, and festivals. Through the event planning process, special events will be examined from a logistical and financial perspective. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving effectiveness and profitability when managing special events, which demands competence in the areas of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, staffing, and accounting. Special attention is given to the use of new digital tools for the organization of events as well as the significant forms of social media in order to more effectively promote events. Coursework is tailored for students who already have studied the basics of event management.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community.
In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELSF365 | Section: I | Open
This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELSL500 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course focuses on the production of long shelf-life handcrafted baked products, a branch of traditional pastry art that is unfortunately a prerogative of industrial food production today. Students will learn how to prepare artisan travel cakes and snacks to go thanks to an in-depth study of the role of single ingredients and their balancing. 
Sugars, fats, mixing methods, cooking temperatures and food safety will be analyzed from the perspective of their impact on the final product shelf-life.
An emphasis will be put on the role of water and hydration in baked products and how water influences the textural properties during storage.
The course also includes the study of the calculation of free water in cakes, together with storage and preservation environment management and notions of food contamination and oxidation.
Students will learn how to prepare traditional and contemporary travel cakes. Students will also learn artisan methods to reproduce famous Italian packaged snacks.
 This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELSM340 | Section: I | Open
This course provides a strong foundation of knowledge for anyone interested in learning about the spa community. Students taking this course will develop an understanding of the main skills required to manage and operate a profitable spa in the multifaceted spa industry. They will explore industry evolution from ancient civilizations to new frontiers of convergence that integrates spas, medicine, healthcare, tourism, and hospitality. A comprehensive overview of spa operations will be provided with an emphasis on current business models and perspectives on maximizing business success. Students will learn all aspects of the successful day-to-day operation of a spa as well as business strategies to employ for sustained growth and profitability in this constantly evolving industry. In-class discussion will focus on definition and market segmentation of spa categories including day, resort, medical, destination, hospital, and lifestyle management programs. Topics include: conceptual skills in management, operations, finance, human resources, marketing, products, treatments, and equipment from initial design and business planning process to opening a spa and managing operations and positioning for managed future growth. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSELTF507 | Section: II | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our senses as they interact with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order define the tools to examine flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding for appreciation. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises,learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Field Learning | Course #: PSFLCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Internships | Course #: PSININ450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Internships | Course #: PSININ450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Internships | Course #: PSININ450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Internships | Course #: PSININ450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120

Sport and Health Sciences

3.0 Credits
Sport Sciences | Course #: SHSSEF280 | Section: IV | Open
This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. The experiential learning component will enhance the students perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sport Sciences | Course #: SHSSFW380 | Section: IV | Open
Wellness is the search for enhanced quality of life, personal and potential growth, through the choice of positive lifestyle behaviors and attitudes. Health can be improved on a daily basis by taking responsibility for our own well being.
This course will teach students how our state of wellness is deeply influenced by a variety of factors including nutrition, physical activity, stress-coping methods, good relationships, and career success. Emphasis will be placed on the benefits of a constant and planned physical activity and on the understanding how each of these benefits is important to long-term health.
The course provides students with the basic knowledge of primary (cardiorespiratory ability, muscular ability, flexibility, and body composition) and secondary (balance, coordination, agility, reaction time, speed, power, mental capability) components of fitness as well as the basics of anatomy. The course will teach students how to combine a targeted nutrition and physical activity for the pursue of good health as well as develop physical skills that also enhance the psychological and emotional well being. Emphasis will be placed on the differences between health-related fitness and skill-related fitness. 
The course includes physical activity sessions focused on general physical wellness.
Contact Hours: 45

Internships
Short program students can apply for a part time 3 credit internship to be completed as part of the elective program. Students are placed in internships that complement their major or minor, and are supported by an internship supervisor. While Italian language proficiency is not required, it is helpful for expanding the placement options. At the completion of the internship, students produce an analytical report that synthesizes what they have learned. For more information on internships see FUA Internships.

Program Add-On: Cultural Introduction to Italy course (1 week / 3 credits)
The 1 week Cultural Introduction to Italy course can be added to the FUA short session I program only. The traveling course is comprised of field study and travel research on location in destinations unique for their local cultures, economies, histories, and societies. Students participating in this course arrive in Rome the week prior to their regular program start and spend one week participating in lectures, visiting historic and contemporary sites, tasting local gastronomy, and experiencing the culture of Tuscany. At the end of the week, students travel to Florence to complete their regular program. Please note: students enrolled in this program add-on course arrive in Rome on August 25, 2019.

Courses & Schedule
Short sessions are comprised of 3 week courses, with a one week break between each when combining multiple sessions. The 3 week courses run Monday through Friday (5 days/week), with finals at the end of each 3 week period. Students select 1 or 2 courses for each 3 week session they are enrolled.

Course Registration
SAI students complete their course registration directly with FUA through the FUA student portal. Upon confirming enrollment in the SAI program at FUA, students receive information for creating their FUA student portal and selecting their classes. FUA courses are competitive and registration begins months ahead of the application deadline. Courses will fill rapidly and on a rolling basis.

Course Changes
Students wishing to make changes to their class schedule prior to departure can do so directly by logging into their FUA student account. Students receive an email confirmation from SAI once the change is accepted. Students are permitted to make as many Add/Drop adjustments to their schedule prior to departure as needed. The last day to submit a schedule change prior to departure is approximately 6 weeks prior to departure. After the deadline, no changes can be made until the Add/Drop period in Florence at which time only one additional change can be made, no exceptions.


Pre-Departure Calendar
June 15 2019
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
May 29 2019
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
June 28 2019
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
June 28 2019
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
July 28 2019
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
August 27 2019*
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 6:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
August 29 – 30 2019
SAI & FUA Orientation
Students are welcomed to the program with an orientation that introduces students to their program while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
September 2 2019
Add/Drop Deadline
September 3 2019
FUA Classes Begin
September 19 2019
FUA Classes End
September 20 2019
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.

* Students adding the Program Add-On: Cultural Introduction to Italy course arrive in Rome (FCO airport) on August 25, 2019 by 5:00pm


Pre-Departure Calendar
June 15 2019
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposit Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
June 29 2019
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
July 29 2019
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
July 29 2019
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
August 28 2019
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
September 27 2019
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 2:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
September 27 2019
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
September 30 2019
FUA Academic Orientation
FUA orientation includes academic policies and information, as well as opportunities to take city tours, join clubs, and meet professors.
September 30 2019
Add/Drop Deadline
October 1 2019
FUA Classes Begin
October 17 2019
FUA Classes End
October 18 2019
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.

Pre-Departure Calendar
June 15 2019
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposit Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
July 27 2019
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
August 26 2019
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
August 26 2019
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
September 25 2019
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
October 25 2019
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 6:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
October 25 2019
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
October 28 2019
FUA Academic Orientation
FUA orientation includes academic policies and information, as well as opportunities to take city tours, join clubs, and meet professors.
October 28 2019
Add/Drop Deadline
October 29 2019
FUA Classes Begin
November 14 2019
FUA Classes End
November 16 2019
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.

Pre-Departure Calendar
June 15 2019
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposit Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
August 24 2019
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
September 23 2019
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
September 23 2019
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
October 23 2019
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
November 22 2019
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 6:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
November 22 2019
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
November 25 2019
FUA Academic Orientation
FUA orientation includes academic policies and information, as well as opportunities to take city tours, join clubs, and meet professors.
November 25 2019
Add/Drop Deadline
November 26 2019
FUA Classes Begin
December 11 2019
FUA Classes End
December 12 2019
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 3 weeks / 3 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$4,350
Program Fee: 3 weeks / 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$5,600
Program Fee: 7 weeks / 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$6,550
Program Fee: 7 weeks / 9 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$7,800
Program Fee: 7 weeks / 12 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$8,950
Program Fee: 11 weeks / 9 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$10,400
Program Fee: 11 weeks / 12 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$11,600
Program Fee: 11 weeks / 15 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$12,800
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Add-on: Cultural Introduction to Italy (3 credits)
1 week course prior to regular program, includes housing and travel expenses.
$1,000
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement: 3 weeks
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$345
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement: 7 weeks
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$690
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement: 11 weeks
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$1,035
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement
Price varies by single/double occupancy and meals.
contact SAI
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Florence
$950 $1,300
Books
$50 / course $100 / course
Course Fees & Supplies
$50 / course $300 / course
Meals
Combination of cooking at home and eating out.
$650 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $400 / month
Transportation within Florence
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $175 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Access to and assistance with international cell phone plans
  • Frequent SAI cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Dinner
SAI welcomes students to Florence with a buffet of traditional Italian delights to mingle and get to know participants.

Hike to Piazzale Michelangelo
Located just outside the old city walls, Piazzale Michelangelo offers a bird’s eye view of the city of Florence. Students hike to the top, stopping along the way for gelato. As the sun sets over the city, the group can experience the centuries-old Vespers ceremonial chanting by Cistercian monks in the crypt of the Basilica of San Miniato al Monte.

Wine Tasting
Students spend an afternoon learning about and tasting great wines of the region, perfectly paired with Tuscan specialties.

Italian Cooking Lessons
SAI offers Italian cooking lessons throughout the semester taught by a local expert Chef. Each lesson teaches students how to make typical Tuscan dishes and includes an appetizer, first course, and dessert. At the end of the lesson students feast on their own homemade Italian meal!

Farewell Evening
Students celebrate the end of a successful term abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Italian meal.

The following housing options apply to the regular program. Please note that add-on pre-session courses may have different housing arrangements during the pre-session time only.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing assignments are single gender; other housing configurations may be available under limited circumstances. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
SAI homestay families are thoroughly screened and are accustomed to welcoming visiting students into their homes. Homestays provide a shared or single bedroom in the family home with basic furnishings. Breakfast and/or dinner daily are included. Please note that some homestays may be outside of the city center and require a commute to reach school.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law US citizens studying in Italy for 90 days or less are not required to obtain a student visa. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for details on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.