Florence University of the Arts
Spring 11 Week Semester Elective 2024
9 - 12 credits

During the FUA 11 week semester program, SAI students enroll in multiple elective courses for a total of 9 - 12 semester credits. In addition to typical liberal arts courses, FUA includes such courses as Travel Writing, Pairing Food and Wine, Fashion Design, and Science of Happiness. Semester students have opportunities to pair academic coursework with internships, the SAI Global Leadership Certificate, and unique experiential learning courses for hands-on experience. SAI also offers a longer 15 week semester program at FUA.


Application closed

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Transcript
Passport scan (photo & signature page)
Italian privacy consent form

Updates

  • Complete an internship for credit.
  • Enroll in unique Experiential Learning courses.
  • Spend 11 weeks in Florence – no student visa required!

Program Dates
February 20, 2024 – May 9, 2024
dates may differ as a result of add-ons


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above.

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Horticulture
Hospitality
Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Journalism, Communication, and Publishing
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sciences and Mathematics
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAC200 | Section: IV | Closed
The course covers the fundamentals of accounting theory and practice and is designed for the non-accounting and finance students. Topics cover accounting terminology, revenue expenses, net income, the accounting equation, debits, credits, balancing the accounting formula, the account structure, and ledgers. Emphasis is given to the use of basic financial accounting concepts to make well-informed business decisions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Decision Sciences | Course #: BUDSSN400 | Closed
This course explores the major concepts and theories of the psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict and its resolution. Students will familiarize with negotiation strategies and planning, as well as with ethics in negotiation. This course will also focus on international and cross-cultural negotiation strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: BUECGE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, or equivalent.
The course on the history of global economy is divided into two sections. The first will provide an overview of the evolution of global economy over the last five centuries. Topics will discuss the emergence of the New World Economy and will examine the integration of product, labor, and capital markets. The second part of the course will employ micro and macroeconomic analysis tools to examine the catalysts and obstacles of market integration, and the impact of globalization on the economy and welfare of nations. Other topics include the role of international institutions such as the IMF and the WTO, the impact of changing economic environments on competitive strategy, the emerging trade blocs (European Union, NAFTA), the fluctuation of exchange rates, and the emergence of new markets. Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, or equivalent.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUERFU450 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the world of non-profit fundraising. Fundraising strategies are employed by charitable and non-profit institutions to raise financial support for projects and initiatives, and represent an essential feature of non-profit organization and operations. Students will become familiarized with philanthropic activity, donor relations, and strategies. Through the sponsoring organization, students will gain a meaningful experience in fundraising practices in areas such as development, promotion, and communications. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUERFU450 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the world of non-profit fundraising. Fundraising strategies are employed by charitable and non-profit institutions to raise financial support for projects and initiatives, and represent an essential feature of non-profit organization and operations. Students will become familiarized with philanthropic activity, donor relations, and strategies. Through the sponsoring organization, students will gain a meaningful experience in fundraising practices in areas such as development, promotion, and communications. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUERFU450 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the world of non-profit fundraising. Fundraising strategies are employed by charitable and non-profit institutions to raise financial support for projects and initiatives, and represent an essential feature of non-profit organization and operations. Students will become familiarized with philanthropic activity, donor relations, and strategies. Through the sponsoring organization, students will gain a meaningful experience in fundraising practices in areas such as development, promotion, and communications. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality Management | Course #: HPHLHK420 | Closed
This course introduces the operations for successful housekeeping management. Students will learn how to apply systems of communications, maintenance, inventory, laundry, operating and payroll budgets, labor that are a part of the everyday reality faced by hospitality managers. the application of these techniques is aimed at providing the best services with maximum efficiency on the operational and customer levels.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR350 | Closed
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR630 | Open
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of an undergraduate degree is required for this course. Undergraduates of Junior/Senior standing with a min 3.0 GPA may apply. Letter of motivation required.
This course examines human resources management in a global context. Course topics provide students with a broad understanding of the strategies adopted by multinational organizations (MNCs or MNEs) that manage their employees across different countries and cultures. Key concepts, theories and contemporary practices are introduced and analyzed throughout the module. An important highlight is the impact that HR management decisions may have on an organization�s success at the international level. Students will gain an understanding of how to systematically illustrate, define, categorize, and analyze a broad and advanced-level range of issues related to human resources management operations in a global economy. Prerequisites: Successful completion of an undergraduate degree is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAIB620 | Open
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of an undergraduate degree is required for this course. Undergraduates of Junior/Senior standing with a min 3.0 GPA may apply. Letter of motivation required.
This course offers an overview of theories and business practices related to building and managing brand identity at the international level. Starting from the legal connotations of a brand, key course components include the design and implementation of international branding and marketing programs through communication strategies and brand associations in order to build brand equity. Topics also explore new strategies aimed at extending or revitalizing existing brands to retain brand loyalty and consumer engagement, as well as to build an international community around the brand concept. A specific focus will also be dedicated to the panorama of the industrial and intellectual property rights (IPRs) for the management, economic exploitation, and protection of international brands. Through case studies, research, and active projects, students will fully experience and acquire a deeper understanding of the challenges and processes in globalizing a brand.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAIM310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is geared towards students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills and strategy will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. The class will focus on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures form an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAMA450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be able to explore the environment of management practices through exposure to an established business in Florence. The position will feature the development of a tailored project that will provide the student with the opportunity to contribute to the organization through the student's perspective. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAMA450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be able to explore the environment of management practices through exposure to an established business in Florence. The position will feature the development of a tailored project that will provide the student with the opportunity to contribute to the organization through the student's perspective. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAMA450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be able to explore the environment of management practices through exposure to an established business in Florence. The position will feature the development of a tailored project that will provide the student with the opportunity to contribute to the organization through the student's perspective. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMANP325 | Closed
The course provides the tools and strategies required for the development and marketing of new products. Topics include conducting market researches for product launches, practices for differentiating specific products from the competition, incorporating innovative processes for cutting-edge results, capturing a market position for new products, marketing plans, forecasting sales and customer satisfaction, and delivering new products to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMASM300 | Closed
This course focuses on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of sales execution. Topics range from developing a market strategy to choosing a sales methodology, establishing a successful sales culture, developing and implementing a talent management system, offering rewards to support the sales force, and evaluating success via the metrics system. The course engages students in the current issues of sales management. Students examine case studies of leading sales organizations and develop their own sales execution plan in teams throughout the term.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM305 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM310 | Open
The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of entrepreneurial companies that are starting out, therefore those with lower budgets and little or no brand development. Students will study segmentation, positioning, marketing methods for new ventures, finding competitive strategies in limited resource environments, and implementing strategies aimed to launch successful enterprises.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM280 | Closed
This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the brand in today's consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behavior and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and experience shopping - visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKIT320 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent
This course further develops the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures and identifying specific marketing techniques and the modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. Topics include global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKMK450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course is designed for students who are looking to enhance their experience and knowledge of marketing strategies and techniques in an international context. The internship will expose students to a business environment where interns will contribute to the organization according to their skill and competency background. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKMK450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course is designed for students who are looking to enhance their experience and knowledge of marketing strategies and techniques in an international context. The internship will expose students to a business environment where interns will contribute to the organization according to their skill and competency background. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKMK450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course is designed for students who are looking to enhance their experience and knowledge of marketing strategies and techniques in an international context. The internship will expose students to a business environment where interns will contribute to the organization according to their skill and competency background. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKWM325 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing
Recent years have seen the evolution and revolution in business communication. The birth of the web was the inspiration that led to a different way of relating between companies and customers. Approaches led to a constant customer participation in the creation and development of the business image. Web marketing is based on techniques and principles applicable to all sectors and also suitable for small and medium-sized enterprises up to now often cut off from mass media because of the enormous budget required. But the web is not just sites, in recent years social networks have pointed the way towards a clear undisputed sway. Communication on social networks isn't only about purchasing advertising as in traditional media or even on most websites. The social is the most striking feature of what is called Web 2.0: the network of conversations; and the conversations don't occur only among customers, but must exist between the company and customers to stimulate the most powerful communication tool: word of mouth. A company that does not speak with customers is bound to be forgotten.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREEL350 | Open
This course focuses on the essentials of real estate law and provides students with a strong understanding of the role of the real estate paralegal. Students will be introduced to the law of real property and will gain knowledge of the main elements of real estate contracts. Lessons will also include notions of deeds' development, leases, licenses and title insurance. Students will analyze and compare Civil and Common Law.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BURERE280 | Section: II | Open
The aim of this course is to provide student with an overview of the main characteristics of the real estate industry. Students will learn about the real estate business and will compare the Anglo-American and Italian systems. This course includes an introduction to real estate contract law and to Civil Law and Common Law in order to understand the different approaches of the legislation that regulates the real estate world. Students will also gain knowledge of the basics of real estate market economics including USA's foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to Italy.
Contact Hours: 45

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: DIDMDC610 | Open
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of an undergraduate degree is required for this course. Undergraduates of Junior/Senior standing with a min 3.0 GPA may apply. Letter of motivation required.
This course explores the varied aspects of digital communication through an approach that considers both theory and practice for building effective communication strategies. Students will examine advanced topics related to web and social media communication, the role of research in digital strategies, development and implementation of communication planning, and the evolving positioning of digital communication within organizations. Communication design will be a key focus of the course through the analysis of relevant case studies and the evaluation of applicability of communication strategy through course projects. Important areas of investigation will address creative content creation, communication building based on organizational identity and branding, user trends and interaction, data and performance analysis, concept diversification for multi-platform communication operations, integrated marketing practices, and management and oversight of digital strategy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDD140 | Open
Film photography provides spatial and temporal context while digital photography shortens the process of contextualization thanks to technology. This does not mean that one medium is better or worse than the other, and the aim of this introductory course seeks to provide a strong film foundation in order to enhance the approach to digital photography. Students will explore the concept of photographic context by being exposed to both film and digital processes. Film is tangible, it requires a tactile relationship with negatives, paper, and chemistry. The use of physical properties of film will transition to digital darkroom techniques and vice versa. Topics include historic milestones in the history of photography, compositional aesthetics, camera mechanics, control of light sources and metering, film and digital exposure, and darkroom and digital processing. Students will come away from the course having gained an understanding of the similarities, rather than differences, and the underlying relationships between the two mediums.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDD140 | Open
Film photography provides spatial and temporal context while digital photography shortens the process of contextualization thanks to technology. This does not mean that one medium is better or worse than the other, and the aim of this introductory course seeks to provide a strong film foundation in order to enhance the approach to digital photography. Students will explore the concept of photographic context by being exposed to both film and digital processes. Film is tangible, it requires a tactile relationship with negatives, paper, and chemistry. The use of physical properties of film will transition to digital darkroom techniques and vice versa. Topics include historic milestones in the history of photography, compositional aesthetics, camera mechanics, control of light sources and metering, film and digital exposure, and darkroom and digital processing. Students will come away from the course having gained an understanding of the similarities, rather than differences, and the underlying relationships between the two mediums.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDD140 | Open
Film photography provides spatial and temporal context while digital photography shortens the process of contextualization thanks to technology. This does not mean that one medium is better or worse than the other, and the aim of this introductory course seeks to provide a strong film foundation in order to enhance the approach to digital photography. Students will explore the concept of photographic context by being exposed to both film and digital processes. Film is tangible, it requires a tactile relationship with negatives, paper, and chemistry. The use of physical properties of film will transition to digital darkroom techniques and vice versa. Topics include historic milestones in the history of photography, compositional aesthetics, camera mechanics, control of light sources and metering, film and digital exposure, and darkroom and digital processing. Students will come away from the course having gained an understanding of the similarities, rather than differences, and the underlying relationships between the two mediums.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Photography or equivalent, Intermediate Photography (film or digital) or equivalent.
Through this course, students meet and collaborate with designers, art directors, hair and make-up teams, and professional models to come up with a specific fashion ad campaign and lookbook for up-and-coming Florentine designers in the field of fashion. Students will learn how to meet with clients, present ideas (story and mood boards), design sets, and execute a campaign according to client needs. The course examines studio and location lighting, flash units, light metering, and set design according to a specific project. Photography software is utilized at an advanced level to process and produce a final campaign and portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID180 | Closed
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHIP250 | Closed
iPhoneography is a photography concept that involves the professional use of the iPhone camera. Various iPhone apps and constant connection to the internet (either via wi-fi or cellular data) can turn an iPhone camera into a powerful, self-sustained, hand-held camera and darkroom ready to release information globally in the constantly changing digital market. Students will learn to use the iPhone camera to produce photojournalism essays, portraits, landscape, and fashion images using different iPhone applications and professional post-processing tools. The final images will be published in a dedicated class website and will be delivered to students as fine art prints for their final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

iPhone or iPad with a camera, purchase capacity for up to 7 different applications, (an Apple account with credit card must be activated before course start).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPH450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
Through the photography internship course, students will collaborate with professional photographers and photo labs. Students will learn to develop research and preparation for photo shoots, become familiarized with diverse shooting locations, and assist with photo assignments. Additional topics may include image processing and printing, assisting with photo shoot logistics, handling photographic equipment, and archiving. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPH450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
Through the photography internship course, students will collaborate with professional photographers and photo labs. Students will learn to develop research and preparation for photo shoots, become familiarized with diverse shooting locations, and assist with photo assignments. Additional topics may include image processing and printing, assisting with photo shoot logistics, handling photographic equipment, and archiving. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPH450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
Through the photography internship course, students will collaborate with professional photographers and photo labs. Students will learn to develop research and preparation for photo shoots, become familiarized with diverse shooting locations, and assist with photo assignments. Additional topics may include image processing and printing, assisting with photo shoot logistics, handling photographic equipment, and archiving. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPJ320 | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended
This course introduces students to the world of photography with specific focus on the photo-journalistic aspects of this art medium. The course will be divided between field study and learning introductory digital techniques, working with both black and white and color digital printing and finishing. the lab practice will give students the capability of elaborating and correctly printing his/her own pictures. the course concentrates on the journalistic area of photography using digital equipment. Students learn about the history, com positional issues and techniques of photojournalism by studying the work of influential photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Smith, Capa, Salgado, Nachtwey, and others. The class will also be conceiving, shooting, printing and laying out a series of documentary projects. This course is recommended for communications, journalism and social science
students. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPJ320 | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended
This course introduces students to the world of photography with specific focus on the photo-journalistic aspects of this art medium. The course will be divided between field study and learning introductory digital techniques, working with both black and white and color digital printing and finishing. the lab practice will give students the capability of elaborating and correctly printing his/her own pictures. the course concentrates on the journalistic area of photography using digital equipment. Students learn about the history, com positional issues and techniques of photojournalism by studying the work of influential photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Smith, Capa, Salgado, Nachtwey, and others. The class will also be conceiving, shooting, printing and laying out a series of documentary projects. This course is recommended for communications, journalism and social science
students. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHSE550 | Open
Pre-requisite: Advanced Digital Photography or equivalent.
This course covers the multiple aspects of the design, preparation, and execution of a personal exhibition and brings together the advanced skills and ideas in making a coherent body of work. Students are expected to work independently on their individual project(s) and to meet with faculty for individual critiques. Students will experience the creative, administrative, and logistical processes of exhibits in order to successfully
produce a solo exhibit and catalog publication. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FAFPFP140 | Open
Pre-requisite: A 35mm SLR or 35mm viewfinder film camera is required for this course.
This course involves theoretical and practical aspects related to film photography. In addition to lectures, coursework will take place both outdoors in the city of Florence and in the darkroom. Students will learn how to use the camera correctly, how to expose film, and the basic principles of black and white photography and composition. In addition, students will be given a broad overview of the history of photography. Students will work on two projects and a final portfolio.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FAFPFP140 | Open
Pre-requisite: A 35mm SLR or 35mm viewfinder film camera is required for this course.
This course involves theoretical and practical aspects related to film photography. In addition to lectures, coursework will take place both outdoors in the city of Florence and in the darkroom. Students will learn how to use the camera correctly, how to expose film, and the basic principles of black and white photography and composition. In addition, students will be given a broad overview of the history of photography. Students will work on two projects and a final portfolio.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPCV205 | Section: II | Open
This introductory course provides students with a foundational knowledge of creative video production and its technical aspects. Students will learn basic video shooting and editing techniques. As a part of the coursework, students will work in groups on video projects in order to experience the various phases of video production from scripting to editing and final output. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVE380 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
In this course students learn the art and craft of editing videos from two award-winning filmmakers. The course explores techniques that can be applied in a range of non-linear editing programs, including Final Cut, Avid, and Premiere. But the main focus is not just on developing software skills, but on exploring the magic behind video modification. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVE380 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
In this course students learn the art and craft of editing videos from two award-winning filmmakers. The course explores techniques that can be applied in a range of non-linear editing programs, including Final Cut, Avid, and Premiere. But the main focus is not just on developing software skills, but on exploring the magic behind video modification. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, video shooting skills, editing software experience.
This internship course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, video shooting skills, editing software experience.
This internship course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, video shooting skills, editing software experience.
This internship course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF300 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Design Fundamental Studio II or equivalent Visual Communication
The aim of this course is to bring together all aspects of multimedia visual communication - from the theoretical to the practical and applying those theories in projects which involve still and moving images - photography and video, graphic design and typography. Emphasis will be placed on a design practice which is shaped by an understanding of the cultural and social aspects of communication, together with an appreciation of the power of images and words. Guest speakers and site visits have an important role in this hands-on course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCVC450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work layout and illustration software experience.
Through the visual communication internship course, students will apply visual and aesthetic inspiration and strategies to creative projects. Students will assist the visual communication staff of the placement organization (i.e. marketing and graphic design teams for companies or freelancers) to develop the visual component of communications-based projects. Tasks may include assisting with items and tasks related to graphic design, photography and video assignments, and websites in formats such as e-newsletters, communication strategies and proposals, flyers, presentations, logos, and brochures. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCVC450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work layout and illustration software experience.
Through the visual communication internship course, students will apply visual and aesthetic inspiration and strategies to creative projects. Students will assist the visual communication staff of the placement organization (i.e. marketing and graphic design teams for companies or freelancers) to develop the visual component of communications-based projects. Tasks may include assisting with items and tasks related to graphic design, photography and video assignments, and websites in formats such as e-newsletters, communication strategies and proposals, flyers, presentations, logos, and brochures. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCVC450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work layout and illustration software experience.
Through the visual communication internship course, students will apply visual and aesthetic inspiration and strategies to creative projects. Students will assist the visual communication staff of the placement organization (i.e. marketing and graphic design teams for companies or freelancers) to develop the visual component of communications-based projects. Tasks may include assisting with items and tasks related to graphic design, photography and video assignments, and websites in formats such as e-newsletters, communication strategies and proposals, flyers, presentations, logos, and brochures. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVPAV350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Creative Video-making or equivalent.
Through this advanced course, students apply previously acquired skills to the final editing of a video. Video effects, audio, and digital effects and their aesthetic and technical considerations are put into practice throughout the completion of the video project. The course objective is to connect the different production stages in order provide students with a comprehensive experience of the expressive power of the medium. Students will use advanced video software in order to be familiarized with industry trends and practices, and use DSLR cameras to shoot HD video.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVPCV200 | Section: II | Open
This course provides students with the knowledge of the technical terms of creative video production and the skills to understand basic video shooting and editing techniques. Students will team up and follow a single project starting from the script all the way through editing and final output.
Contact Hours: 90

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAF345 | Closed
Pre-requisite: A good command of sketching and rendering techniques is however highly recommended.
Through this course, students will learn the different aspects of athletic footwear in order to design and construct original products. Various methods of applying design and production techniques to different types of athletic shoe categories including running, basketball, and tennis shoes will be examined. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course. A good command of sketching and rendering techniques is however highly recommended.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADDF354 | Closed
This advanced course allows students to investigate the designs and uses of different types of decorations and finishes for accessories, by developing inventive skills in the creation of applications. An approach based on diverse materials and techniques and the study of small metal parts and their role in fashion accessory design and positioning will be instrumental in the final creation of an original piece.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADLT340 | Closed
This course offers the opportunity to study several ornamentation techniques: trapunto, welting, pleating, inlay, weaving. Students learn the different methods of application on leather apparel and on accessories such as handbags, belts and shoes, and acquire basic pattern making skills related to leather garments. This semester class will introduce the student to the subject and then focus on the area of study.

This course is intensive and practical and includes cutting, preparing, sewing and assembly. Also, it provides a real insight into the leather process in a workshop.

An asset of the class is the opportunity to showcase student work at FLY, the non-profit retail store of FAST, alongside professional emerging designers based in Italy. All works produced by students will be featured with garment specifications, photographed, and published for promo- tion on school websites. Garments will undergo a selection process for in-store and classroom placement. Furthermore, FAST experiential learning and internship students will then utilize these items to create window displays and other special installations throughout the season. For this reason, it is not possible for students to take garments, accessories, and the like home upon course completion. In the event that a garment is sold, all profits will go to- ward FUA scholarship funds for future FAST students.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDDK300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Knitwear Design, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The history between computers and textile design goes back to when the first Jacquard Loom machine was invented. In this course, students discover how computers and knitting machines are connected through the exploration of knitwear software and the home knitting machine. By combining these elements and other digital tools (Adobe Photoshop as well as other image editing software), students will be able to execute complex patterns using different colors, working with electronic knitting machines, to gain a better understanding of how the Jacquard process works. Through a series of exercises and lectures, students investigate electronic knitting machine functions and learn how to create and convert patterns on computers using software and load them on knitting machine, calculate and design patterns, and using traditional techniques of trims and garment assembly to make their final capsule collection.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCCF390 | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion majors, Junior standing. Unofficial transcript submission required.
In this course students learn the steps involved in managing and producing fashion shows featuring designer collections and seasonal trends. Topics cover logistics, budget management, fashion show categories, creativity and art direction, broadcasting and promoting shows, and the role of the show within the business aspects of the fashion industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFB300 | Closed
This course aims to discuss the complex art of operating fashion businesses in Italy. Topics addresses the dynamics of interacting with designers, buyers, and retail managers, and identify effective ways of conducting negotiations, solving issues, and closing a deal. Coursework will give students a significant exposure to the world of fashion in Italy by analyzing both its rich panorama made up of traditions, humble origins, and the current multinational brands dominating the international market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFI290 | Closed
This course features a sociological journey in recent history as seen through the lives and styles of the most influential people of the twentieth century from Jacqueline Kennedy to Lada Gaga, from celebrity fashion designers to recent stylists and influencers. Fashion icons from varying backgrounds and occupations, such as Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Queen Elisabeth II, Madonna, as well as their Italian counterparts, will be analyzed. The aim of the course is to identify the roles and identities represented by female fashion icons and how they are perceived today in terms of current fashion ideologies, lifestyle, and social changes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFM300 | Section: IV | Open
This course examines fashion as a form of communication and culture using a diverse range of readings. Topics include: what fashion means and how it has been valued through history, popular culture and media institutions. Students explore economic and social issues that revolve around fashion's industrial production and analyze fashion both in terms of its production and consumption, addressing its role in relation to identity and body politics (gender, race, sexuality, class), art and status, nationhood and the global economy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCSC280 | Closed
Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and stealing the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the new in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship. Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCSC280 | Closed
Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and stealing the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the new in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship. Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: PSELCV205 | Section: II | Open
This introductory course provides students with a basic knowledge of creative video production and its technical aspects. Students will learn basic video shooting and editing techniques. As a part of the coursework, students will work in groups on video projects in order to experience the various phases of video production from scripting to editing and final output.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be
involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDAD320 | Closed
This course offers a solid foundation in the fundamentals of basic
construction, draping techniques, alterations and fitting techniques for
apparel. the emphasis of the course is on the importance of proper fit
and craftsmanship. Students develop and construct design concepts
in muslin and soft fabric on the dress form.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFS350 | Closed
What does it mean to be a stylist in a digital first world, where everybody has a voice and the opportunity to deliver across multiple platforms? This course is focused on the role and significance of a fashion stylist in the broader industry, as a cultural gatekeeper, storyteller, talent spotter and curators of ideas. Students will understand the variety of roles that a stylist can undertake, with a detailed study of styling for Editorial, Fashion Shows, Celebrities, Advertising, Brand Marketing and E-Commerce. Hands on work with designers' garments is provided to students to create sets for fashion shootings and fashion shows. Ultimate goal of this course is to educate the students' eyes to identify and manage the visual impact of trends and ideas. Case studies will be provided, revealing the creative process of relevant stylists of the industry, and explaining concept development from the initial idea to the finished shoot.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDPM260 | Section: III | Open
In this course students will develop skills in pattern making, from concept and design to completion, drafting and executing patterns for garments using simple textiles such as cotton. Important focus is placed on the use of pattern design software for fashion production. By working with flat patternmaking techniques as well as the Cad system, students will develop pattern designs by transferring ideas onto paper or digital format, to create and modify designs, as both artisanal and industrial fashion production require. A relevant outcome of this course will be the acquired capability to interpret fashion projects with a new view, through the understanding and development of the pattern.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF360 | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF365 | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smallerscale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 195
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF365 | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smallerscale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMVM325 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course examines the creative field of visual merchandising and its importance to the retail and fashion industries. Students develop skills in the evaluation and implementation of visual merchandising concepts. The key elements covered include merchandising, principles and elements of design, terminology, and evaluation.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT300 | Closed
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is to have students familiarize with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop the creative potential present in every human being. During the class meetings students will use their own personal experiences to help them to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context: students will in effect conduct experiments on themselves. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common items, such as buttons, boxes, leaves and so on. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. All these essential elements which make up the created image - space, color, movement and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one;s inner world. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT300 | Closed
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is to have students familiarize with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop the creative potential present in every human being. During the class meetings students will use their own personal experiences to help them to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context: students will in effect conduct experiments on themselves. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common items, such as buttons, boxes, leaves and so on. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. All these essential elements which make up the created image - space, color, movement and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one;s inner world. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT304 | Closed
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is for students to become familiar with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop creative expressions. During class meetings, students will use their own personal experiences by conducting direct experiments to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course, students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common objects. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. The essential elements that compose the created image - space, color, movement, and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one's inner world.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT304 | Closed
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is for students to become familiar with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop creative expressions. During class meetings, students will use their own personal experiences by conducting direct experiments to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course, students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common objects. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. The essential elements that compose the created image - space, color, movement, and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one's inner world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This advanced lecture/lab course explores the history of art therapy as well as different contemporary theoretical approaches as well as practical applications of art therapy in various contexts and settings. Specific advanced scientific literature will be discussed, case studies will be analyzed, and contemporary challenges will be dealt with in order to shape critical knowledge of art therapy ethics, boundaries, limits and meanings associated with taking care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using their own personal experiences, students will use a great variety of media from diverse perspectives first-hand: writing, drawing, painting, collaging, and other techniques will be connected to each art therapy perspective in different ways in order to offer an idea of the flexibility required when dealing with this discipline. Glimpses will be also offered on other expressive art therapies such as music therapy and dance therapy. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art Therapy or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Ceramics | Course #: FACECE200 | Closed
In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. In the first part of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. In the second part of the course, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing. Slide lectures will give students essential information on the nature of clay and glazes. the history of Mediterranean ceramics will be covered during in-class lectures. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Intermediate Painting
This is a rigorous course which allows advanced students to work on individual projects, developing their strengths, and working on areas of weakness. Student will emerge from the course not only having developed a personal language but also having attained a high level of technical competence in traditional methods and materials. Students will also have considerable practice time in non-traditional techniques and methods. challenging individual critiques are an important component of this course and out-of-town field trips, including the Museum of contemporary art in Prato, are included.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFD120 | Closed
Working from still life, the natural and urban surroundings of the city of Florence and figure models, the student will learn the basic techniques of drawing, perspective, proportion, and composition. Students will explore the different media of drawing: pencil, charcoal, pen and ink. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFP120 | Closed
This course teaches beginning students the fundamental principles and techniques of painting, focusing on oil painting with concentration on human figures and still-life. Students will learn the build-up of form, tone and color on a two-dimensional surface. Practical demonstrations are supplemented by slide lectures and visits to Florentine museums to view oil paintings first hand. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFP200 | Closed
The aim of this combined studio art/lecture course is to introduce fresco painting (wall painting) to students who have not necessarily studied art history or acquired any form of artistic training. This course explains what fresco painting is and why it became one of the most important painting techniques in Renaissance Italy. Using a radically new and exciting approach to understanding this painting technique and the historical and political contexts in which these masterpieces were created, students will leave the course with a unique understanding of frescoes and their golden age. The primary focus of this course is to provide students with an intimate experience of how a fresco is created. They will be handling the basic ingredients of fresco painting, i.e. sand, lime, stone, stucco and mineral pigments, to create their own frescoes using traditional techniques. The aim of this course is an understanding of fresco technique and therefore focuses on process rather than the final product. An integral part of the course are the site visits to ascend the scaffolding in Florentine churches and palaces to witness at first hand the restoration of great fresco cycles normally closed to the public.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFS225 | Open
This course is designed to take full advantage of the student's unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channeled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significant and visual interest ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists for centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDIP220 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Painting
This course builds on the basic elements of painting introduced in the foundation level course. The technical study of oil painting continues with a focus upon the nude human form through the use of figure models. Students will be guided through the challenges of color, composition, value and pictorial dynamics. This progressive building up of skills is balanced by the encouragement of the emerging personal artistic expression of each student. group and individual critiques serve to analyze this personal expression as much as to monitor the mastering of the technical skills of painting. Visits to exhibits in Florence of contemporary painting will form part of the course.

(90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours)

Contact Hours: 90

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBC310 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Students will study the history and background of various national and regional cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical cakes, variations from classical methods, and customer-driven deviations from traditional preparations. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings, and glazes, with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skill execution for Italian cakes. Special attention will be paid to advanced creaming methods (separated creaming methods, creaming without leavening agents) and combination methods. Piping skills are practiced.


Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBI325 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Building on previous knowledge, students learn to mix, shape, bake, store, and distribute breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on increased use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment, and methods that emphasize flavor, texture, and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf life. this course offers the opportunity to learn the principles and techniques of preparing multi-grain breads, sourdoughs, holiday or seasonal breads, and flat breads. Special emphasis will be placed on Italian regional breads; handling grains (such as soakers) for specialty breads; mixing, shaping, and finishing specialty breads; and learning innovative baking methods.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP450 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this placement, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPCA450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course introduces the principles involved in tempering chocolate, creating chocolate sculptures, forming simple centerpieces, and preparing chocolates and other confections with soft, hard, and liquid centers. Students learn to use traditional and contemporary production methods in creating confections both by hand and with special equipment. Efficient methods to increase productivity in this highly specialized field will be highlighted.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPEN690 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Master Italian Pastry Arts II or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Pastry Art finds its greatest expression in the production of entremets. Pastry Chefs all around the world use entremets to create their signature collections and their fame.
The course will focus on the application of dedicated mousse bases, textural inserts, cremoso, cremeaux, buttercreams, supremes, alcohol application. An emphasis will be put in the development of tartlet entremets, application of vegetables, spices and exotic ingredients and the creation of room temperature entremets. This course is entirely dedicated to the application of all advanced and master pastry techniques for the creation of what can be considered to be the business card of a Pastry Chef.




 This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPIC440 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course introduces students to classically applied mediums used in
display work and decoration. Students will learn to execute specific
designs in pastillage, rolled fondant, gum paste, and royal icing, as well
as with poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Production, storing of all types
of candied fruits and Italian mostarda. Production and storing of jams
and conserves, fruit jellies, Italian croccante, sugar fondant, almond
paste.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPP490 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course explores stimulating applications of both classic and contemporary pastry techniques to pastry shop and a la carte restaurant production. The program focuses on three main topics: the use of freezing temperatures through a survey of the possible applications in which cold temperatures and the balance of ingredients play a fundamental role; handling fresh and seasonal fruits in pastry production; the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create products with unexpectedly smooth textures, a wide variety of gels and contemporary mousses, and pastry applications of molecular gastronomy. Through this experience students will have the possibility to understand the role of specific ingredients in the production of ices in order to serve frozen desserts with a perfect balance between texture and temperature. The course will disclose all the secrets of pastry arts classics like semifreddo, bomba gelato, parfait and bon bons. Special emphasis will be placed on the uses of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. The course offers a full-immersion in the pastry lab production with an important focus on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow pastry chefs to develop their creativity in order to reach new unexpected results. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPT470 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
This course is the advanced phase of Baking Technique courses. Students will experience the application of previously learned foundations to a variety of pastry products such as pie doughs, baked custards, and advanced spongecake recipes. The course introduces a wide range of methods that will be combined for the creation of laminated doughs, souffles, Bavarian mousses, and pate a bombe mousses. Students will learn how to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. Prerequisites: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPT475 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course introduces non-yeast, laminated dough's and the
preparation of pastry products using a variety of methods-lamination, blending, creaming, foaming, and thickening. Students will combine these methods in new products, to create savory items and frozen desserts, and to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. The fundamentals of heat transfer as applied to pastries in the preparation of creams, custards, souffles, butter creams, meringues, and flavored whipped creams will also be studied. Students will taste and test the products created and will complete a research assignment.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPRD495 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking and Pastry Majors only.
This course covers the preparation and service of hot and cold desserts with a focus on individual desserts and the components involved in preparation. Students will learn and improve station organization, timing, and service coordination for restaurant dessert production. Products made will include fried products, tarts, souffle, creams, frozen desserts. Both individual plated desserts, and desserts for banquets will be prepared. Students will develop a dessert menu from the perspective of variety, costs, practicality, and how well it matches the rest of the menu. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive
operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPSA570 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian Confectionery Art or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is directed toward students that want to master the art of sugar works. During the lessons students will learn a variety of techniques and possible applications of sugar decorations in pastry. A special focus will be put on the composition of a sugar sculpture from sketches to assembly through the application of advanced working techniques such as stamped sugar, poured sugar, pulled sugar, and blown sugar: each technique will be used to create the elements of a final centerpiece. The course will teach students how to produce sugar flowers, ribbons, leaves, fruits, small subjects, and spheres. An emphasis will be put in the application of powder, paste and liquid color in sugar as well as glitters, silver and gold leaf application.




Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPSB350 | Section: II | Closed
Since ancient times bread has had a significance that goes beyond mere sustenance. Almost every society in the world eats bread in some form and bread has always been considered a symbol of life for all mankind. Bread celebrates life and plays a leading role in traditional celebrations and festivities. This course focuses on traditional Italian specialty breads, made with special, or alternative flours, shaped by local folklore and passed down from generation to generation like the most precious gift.
Students will be introduced to natural yeast production and learn how to keep the yeast alive and strengthen it for better leavening as well as the nutritional advantages and flavor development thanks to its use.
The course offers a complete survey of traditional specialty breads, specialty flatbreads, sweet breads and rolls with an emphasis on old grain flour, alternative flours and local folklore. In addition to this students will be introduced to special diet baking through lessons on gluten free bread and complements.
A special focus is dedicated to Italy's most famous baked product, pizza: through an in-depth analysis pizza will be explained and enjoyed in all its most popular variations.








Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACA450 | Section: II | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, students of the culinary arts internship course are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Interns must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on the weekend and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACA450 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, students of the culinary arts internship course are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Interns must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on the weekend and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAHW200 | Section: IV | Closed
Italy represents longstanding traditions of food culture, wellness, and nutrition through health-oriented practices. Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach health through the lens of food principles. Nutritional facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced a global awareness of a healthy lifestyle. Italy�s approach to seasonality and nutritional balance is characterized by an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle through cultural understanding and integration with the local community. Particular emphasis will be placed, through discussions and direct practice, on seasonality and nutritional principles, whole foods, and freshness, traditional customs, and contemporary innovation. Course topics will also reference the aphorism of We are what we eat and how it aligns with the Italian culinary tradition and culture. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social and cultural implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site cultural activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles in Tuscany and Italy. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAMC550 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Only for Master students
The course offers students an overview of Mediterranean cuisine by identifying and analyzing different macro areas starting from their historical and cultural backgrounds. The diverse cuisines of the countries bordering the Mediterranean sea, their mutual and external influences, and the lore developed throughout the centuries will be thoroughly covered. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and representative techniques of important Mediterranean cuisines. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).�CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in�learning�by�doing�through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC490 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The course is divided into three phases and explores stimulating applications of contemporary cuisine. Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results. Phase 1, Temperature Application: This phase explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. Phase 2, Gels and Thickening Agents: This phase examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested. Phase 3, Gases and Air-Based Preparations: This phase focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). Prerequisites: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCARC360 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only
The course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy. Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions. Though merged and diluted over centuries, Italian regional cuisine still maintains its particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the lifestyle and culture of diverse macro-areas of Italy. Local economy and resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local creations through hands-on practice and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCATF440 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food I or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts Majors.
This course continues to explore the tradition of Italian food through representative recipes. Emphasis will be given to more elaborate dishes, including the cleaning and preparation of shellfish, fresh pasta, food combination's, feast foods and banquets.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAVC420 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The last 40 years of food service have been characterized by a slow yet constant development of nutritional awareness and a more informed approach to food. The aim of the course is not only to offer students techniques for a healthier approach to cooking: this course will focus on cooking techniques that can be applied in order to reduce fat consumption and at same time become the emblems of contemporary cuisine. Flavor-extraction methods, flavoring methods, pressure cooking and sous vide cooking, marinades and brines and the use of alternative fats are nowadays the base of contemporary Chefs creations: students will learn how these techniques can be used to develop a fine dining cuisine that can be healthier yet not necessarily health-fanatic. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAWC480 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary arts majors only.
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside the mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important geographic macro areas. This course allows students to examine the influence of geography and climate on the people, the features of the land, the production of agriculture, the available natural resources, and the main industries in many different areas. Special emphasis will be put on the relationship of attitudes and practices of food preferences and on how foods of a country show a relationship to the social and cultural development of an area. Students will experience food preparation from several cuisines based on the customs and heritage of these cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course, whose aim is to show how the environment, as well as the external cultural influences, is responsible for the characterization of local cuisines. Student will also adapt to various deviations in cooking strategies, develop an understanding of food sources and the availability of these ingredients. During the course students will benefit from practical application of international cooking in a collaborative kitchen environment. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Culinary Arts majors only.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNDM520 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts majors or three semesters of Dietetics and Nutrition course work, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course introduces students to the benefits of eating the
Mediterranean way, focusing on the nutritional aspects of the diet,
the culinary tradition of the most significant Mediterranean countries
and on the cultural relevance of the Mediterranean way of eating.
Scientists and researchers have discovered that traditional
Mediterranean cuisine is one of the most healthful, nutritious diets in the
world, one that can help you live longer and enjoy far lower rates of
coronary heart disease and other chronic conditions, including
diabetes and cancer.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNDS520 | Section: III | Closed
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts majors or three semesters of Dietetics and Nutrition course work, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course introduces students to the benefits of eating the Mediterranean way, focusing on the nutritional aspects of the diet, the culinary tradition of the most significant Mediterranean countries and on the cultural relevance of the Mediterranean way of eating. Scientists and researchers have discovered that traditional Mediterranean cuisine is one of the most healthful, nutritious diets in the world, one that can help you live longer and enjoy far lower rates of coronary heart disease and other chronic conditions, including diabetes and cancer.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNHW200 | Section: IV | Open
Italy represents longstanding traditions of food culture, wellness, and nutrition through health-oriented practices. Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach health through the lens of food principles. Nutritional facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced a global awareness of a healthy lifestyle. Italy's approach to seasonality and nutritional balance is characterized by an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle through cultural understanding and integration with the local community. Particular emphasis will be placed, through discussions and direct practice, on seasonality and nutritional principles, whole foods, and freshness, traditional customs, and contemporary innovation. Course topics will also reference the aphorism of We are what we eat and how it aligns with the Italian culinary tradition and culture. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social and cultural implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site cultural activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles in Tuscany and Italy. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNIN200 | Closed
The continuous growth of nutritional awareness worldwide has brought nutrition to be one of the fundamental subjects in constant evolution during the last decades. This course provides students with basic nutrition concepts and focuses on the overview of the requirements and functions of protein, carbohydrates, lipids and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. Emphasis will be placed on the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle and the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases and the maintenance of a good health status thanks to a balanced food consumption.
The course offers an overview of food policies, food education and an analysis of nowadays eating habits. Students will also learn the guidelines for the balancing of a vegetarian diet and understand how to read a food pyramid.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNSC430 | Section: IV | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts coursework or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Forty years after the first appearance of Molecular Gastronomy, Chefs approach to food has dramatically changed. Gastronomists and food historians talk about the last great food revolution of our times; the movement that changed the way we perceive food and started to stimulate new questions and give interesting answers to those that want to enhance their food knowledge. Since then cooking has taken a great step forward, opening paths once impossible to even think about.
This course is aimed at non-scientific students who wish to approach the world of scientific application toward cooking and want to improve their knowledge of cooking techniques. A scientist and a Chef will alternate teaching the course giving both technical information and practical suggestions. Students will learn cutting edge techniques to create new textures and amazing effects. Prerequisites: Two semesters of Culinary Arts coursework or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNTF480 | Section: II | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. The course is designed to expose students to the theory and practice of sensory evaluation techniques and their application to the composition of dishes. Students gain knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of taste, smell and other senses and experience using these senses as analytical tools to assess food products. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our senses as they get in touch with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami taste really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order to give the students the instruments needed to deal with flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding before being appreciated. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Culinary Arts majors only.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCEC308 | Closed
This course will cover all aspects of chocolate from the scientific,
cultural, and gastronomic points of view. topics include its history from
its Aztec origins to globalization during the Industrial Revolution, the hotly
debated health and aphrodisiac issues surrounding chocolate, the
role of chocolate in literature and films. Students will be introduced to
the processes of chocolate production, types of finished chocolate
products, past and present trends of chocolate preparation and
service, the notions of chocolate pairing, and the chemical makeup of
chocolate and how this influences medical/scientific research. In
addition to the theoretic part of the course, hands on workshops will be
dedicated to chocolate tastings and both classic and innovation
chocolate preparations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFC240 | Closed
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italy-culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: II | Closed
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: IV | Closed
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFJ300 | Closed
Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don't always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration.
Contact Hours: 45