Florence University of the Arts
Spring Semester Elective 2023
12 - 15 credits

Spark your creativity in the heart of the Renaissance. SAI semester students at FUA select multiple elective courses from the wide range of offerings for a total of 12 - 15 credits. In addition to typical liberal arts courses, FUA includes such courses as Travel Writing, Pairing Food and Wine, Fashion Design, and Science of Happiness. Semester students have opportunities to pair academic coursework with internships, the SAI Global Leadership Certificate, and unique experiential learning courses for hands-on experience.


Application: now open
Closes: November 1, 2022
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Transcript
Passport scan (photo & signature page)
USF student conduct form
Italian privacy consent form

Updates

  • Earn a SAI Global Leadership Certificate or International Service Certificate!
  • Gain hands-on experience in experiential learning classes.
  • Complete an internship for credit.

Program Dates
January 24, 2023 – May 11, 2023
dates may differ as a result of add-ons


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above.

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Horticulture
Hospitality
Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Journalism, Communication, and Publishing
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sciences and Mathematics
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Accounting & Finance | Course #: BUAFAB450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Unofficial transcript submission required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be exposed to a commercial business environment or accounting office. The type of business will depend on seasonality and resume evaluation. The student will be able to follow the daily operations of the business establishment and participate in the organization's activities according to his or her skills and competencies. The type of tasks may concern communication with international clients and project development. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements. The internship enhances student knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor who regularly monitors the internship progress and development, and guides the student's preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the student's language and professional skills. Main tasks: Analysis of day by day operations, communication with international clients or research for new partnerships, project development based on business trends, market research, client and data analysis, final portfolio. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Not applicable to remote option. Prerequisites: B2 level of Italian language. Successful completion of Introduction to Accounting or equivalent required. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Decision Sciences | Course #: BUDSSN400 | Open
This course explores the major concepts and theories of the psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict and its resolution. Students will familiarize with negotiation strategies and planning, as well as with ethics in negotiation. This course will also focus on international and cross-cultural negotiation strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: BUECGE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, or equivalent.
The course on the history of global economy is divided into two sections. The first will provide an overview of the evolution of global economy over the last five centuries. Topics will discuss the emergence of the New World Economy and will examine the integration of product, labor, and capital markets. The second part of the course will employ micro and macroeconomic analysis tools to examine the catalysts and obstacles of market integration, and the impact of globalization on the economy and welfare of nations. Other topics include the role of international institutions such as the IMF and the WTO, the impact of changing economic environments on competitive strategy, the emerging trade blocs (European Union, NAFTA), the fluctuation of exchange rates, and the emergence of new markets. Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, or equivalent.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREM305 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of
new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREM310 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shits or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREN350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This placement offers students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of business ventures and entrepreneurship through a set of activities within the EntrepreLearn lab. This CEMI affiliated with FUAs International School of Business (ISB) is dedicated to business and entrepreneurial operations with a specific aim of fostering new ideas and inventions for startup companies. Responsibilities range from research on business opportunities to the development of strategies for other community engagement systems at FUA. Students will assist the ISB division with researching and selecting startup companies within the local territory for institutional collaboration. Furthermore, they will develop entrepreneurial and innovative strategies to increase awareness of non-profit cultural activities. Collaboration with startup ventures and Italian entrepreneurs will be an integral part of the placement. Students will provide data collection, qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as specific planning development shared between ISB and the local industrial association of the province of Florence - Confindustria (confindustriafirenze.it). Special projects are assigned depending on the area of skills and interest. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shits or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire, business attire for formal meetings and external site visits. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUERFU450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the world of non-profit fundraising. Fundraising strategies are employed by charitable and non-profit institutions to raise financial support for projects and initiatives, and represent an essential feature of non-profit organization and operations. Students will become familiarized with philanthropic activity, donor relations, and strategies. Through the sponsoring organization, students will gain a meaningful experience in fundraising practices in areas such as development, promotion, and communications. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality Management | Course #: HPHLHK420 | Open
This course introduces the operations for successful housekeeping management. Students will learn how to apply systems of communications, maintenance, inventory, laundry, operating and payroll budgets, labor that are a part of the everyday reality faced by hospitality managers. the application of these techniques is aimed at providing the best services with maximum efficiency on the operational and customer levels.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMABM310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent.
Brand management is a fundamental element of competitive strategy. This course is intended for students interested in learning about how amongst the most valuable assets managed by companies are the brand names associated with products and services. Strong brands can influence purchase decisions by communicating the value of and providing
differentiation for products and services. Effective brand management is
critical to maintaining the long-term profitability of products and services.
This course is designed to develop students understanding of the importance of brand equity as well as how to build, measure, and manage brand equity. Topics will include understanding brands from the customers perspective, building brand equity, measuring brand equity, leveraging brand equity, managing brand portfolios, and managing brands over time.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAIM310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is geared towards students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills and strategy will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. The class will focus on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures form an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAMA450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this internship course, the student will be able to explore the environment of management practices through exposure to an established business in Florence. The position will feature the development of a tailored project that will provide the student with the opportunity to contribute to the organization through the student's perspective. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMANP325 | Open
The course provides the tools and strategies required for the development and marketing of new products. Topics include conducting market researches for product launches, practices for differentiating specific products from the competition, incorporating innovative processes for cutting-edge results, capturing a market position for new products, marketing plans, forecasting sales and customer satisfaction, and delivering new products to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMASM300 | Open
This course focuses on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of sales execution. Topics range from developing a market strategy to choosing a sales methodology, establishing a successful sales culture, developing and implementing a talent management system, offering rewards to support the sales force, and evaluating success via the metrics system. The course engages students in the current issues of sales management. Students examine case studies of leading sales organizations and develop their own sales execution plan in teams throughout the term.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM305 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM310 | Open
The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of entrepreneurial companies that are starting out, therefore those with lower budgets and little or no brand development. Students will study segmentation, positioning, marketing methods for new ventures, finding competitive strategies in limited resource environments, and implementing strategies aimed to launch successful enterprises.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM280 | Open
This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the brand in today's consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behavior and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and experience shopping - visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKFM360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKIT320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent
This course further develops the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures and identifying specific marketing techniques and the modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. Topics include global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKMK450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: B2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course is designed for students who are looking to enhance their experience and knowledge of marketing strategies and techniques in an international context. The internship will expose students to a business environment where interns will contribute to the organization according to their skill and competency background. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKPR350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Through the public relations placement, students will learn how to promote an organization's business and image. Public relations activities will focus on managing an organization's key messages through content management. Communication strategies, including those related to special events, will be a major emphasis in public relations-related projects. Students will be guided throughout their involvement in PR operations and measuring PR results. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts, shifts that take place on weekends, or ongoing research-based activities for remote placements.
 This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Remote option students will gain international community exposure through a virtual setting.
Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKWC380 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on the business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will consider and analyze course topics including an introduction to communication theory, wine communication practices and trends, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing strategies, economics of the world wine industry, and human resource management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKWC385 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on the business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will consider and analyze course topics including an introduction to communication theory, wine communication practices and trends, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing strategies, economics of the world wine industry, and human resource management. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKWM325 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing
Recent years have seen the evolution and revolution in business communication. The birth of the web was the inspiration that led to a different way of relating between companies and customers. Approaches led to a constant customer participation in the creation and development of the business image. Web marketing is based on techniques and principles applicable to all sectors and also suitable for small and medium-sized enterprises up to now often cut off from mass media because of the enormous budget required. But the web is not just sites, in recent years social networks have pointed the way towards a clear undisputed sway. Communication on social networks isn't only about purchasing advertising as in traditional media or even on most websites. The social is the most striking feature of what is called Web 2.0: the network of conversations; and the conversations don't occur only among customers, but must exist between the company and customers to stimulate the most powerful communication tool: word of mouth. A company that does not speak with customers is bound to be forgotten.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BUREEM365 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The aim of this course is to provide students with an advanced knowledge of real estate management. Students will learn how to conduct a financial analysis on the real estate sector. This course also focuses on real estate marketing management. Students will gain knowledge of financing and taxation, as well as mortgages and access to credit strategies. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Introduction to Management or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Real Estate | Course #: BURERE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this placement is to expose students to the principles of real estate management with an emphasis on property management. Students will be familiarized with planning and organizing all the relevant activities and operations of a real estate business in the on-campus bed & breakfast, Dimora. This experiential learning program focuses on front desk operations including reservation management, welcoming guests and basics of customer care. Students will learn how to independently run a hospitality business including property maintenance and quality control management. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code.
Contact Hours: 150

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHDP340 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience
This is a special project course intended for students who wish to develop skills and experiment with photography. Students create digital works individually and in collaboration with photographers, which are then edited and processed. Students must be prepared for diverse types of photographic approaches depending on projects and assignments, as well as develop management skills for archiving and publishing. Composite printing and experimentation with different techniques may be employed. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHEP420 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Advanced Digital Photography or equivalent.
Using specific exercises and readings students will confront/tackle daily problems of making art. Observations are drawn from personal experiences that relate more to the need of the artist. Students will be engaged in the production and critique of images. There will be discussions and readings for each class. Both will help the student to describe, interpret, evaluate, and to synthesize technical information in order to correlate theory with practice. The coursework is a preparation for the Solo Exhibit and Publication of Solo Work course. Exercises and assignments will culminate into a final project. This course that requires students to thoughtfully examine their work and strive to refine an artistic vision, vocabulary, and voice This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Requires 150 experiential learning hours. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP140 | Open
This course involves theoretical and practical aspects related to film photography. In addition to lectures, coursework will take place both outdoors in the city of Florence and in the darkroom. Students will learn how to use the camera correctly, how to expose film, and the basic principles of black and white photography and composition. In addition, students will be given a broad overview of the history of photography. Students will work on two projects and a final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHFP310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Photography or equivalent, Intermediate Photography (film or digital) or equivalent.
Through this course, students meet and collaborate with designers, art directors, hair and make-up teams, and professional models to come up with a specific fashion ad campaign and lookbook for up-and-coming Florentine designers in the field of fashion. Students will learn how to meet with clients, present ideas (story and mood boards), design sets, and execute a campaign according to client needs. The course examines studio and location lighting, flash units, light metering, and set design according to a specific project. Photography software is utilized at an advanced level to process and produce a final campaign and portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID180 | Open
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHIP250 | Open
iPhoneography is a photography concept that involves the professional use of the iPhone camera. Various iPhone apps and constant connection to the internet (either via wi-fi or cellular data) can turn an iPhone camera into a powerful, self-sustained, hand-held camera and darkroom ready to release information globally in the constantly changing digital market. Students will learn to use the iPhone camera to produce photojournalism essays, portraits, landscape, and fashion images using different iPhone applications and professional post-processing tools. The final images will be published in a dedicated class website and will be delivered to students as fine art prints for their final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

iPhone or iPad with a camera, purchase capacity for up to 7 different applications, (an Apple account with credit card must be activated before course start).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPH450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, DSLR knowledge, Adobe photo software experience.
Through the photography internship course, students will collaborate with professional photographers and photo labs. Students will learn to develop research and preparation for photo shoots, become familiarized with diverse shooting locations, and assist with photo assignments. Additional topics may include image processing and printing, assisting with photo shoot logistics, handling photographic equipment, and archiving. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera (20+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHTC370 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art History or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course examines major philosophies and concepts that have contributed to the discussion of art theory, aesthetic discourse, and contemporary criticism. Reading and analyzing various texts from antiquity to the present, students will explore the underlying questions and meanings of art and how they interact or conflict throughout the development of Western thought. The aim of this course is to equip the student with a foundation in art theory in order to develop an informed critical approach. Texts covered in class will include writings by philosophers, critics, and artists such as Plato, Alberti, Kant, Benjamin, Greenberg, Barthes, Baudrillard, Lippard, and Trin T. Minha. Prerequisites: Introduction to Art History.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FAFPFP140 | Open
Pre-requisite: A 35mm SLR or 35mm viewfinder film camera is required for this course.
This course involves theoretical and practical aspects related to film photography. In addition to lectures, coursework will take place both outdoors in the city of Florence and in the darkroom. Students will learn how to use the camera correctly, how to expose film, and the basic principles of black and white photography and composition. In addition, students will be given a broad overview of the history of photography. Students will work on two projects and a final portfolio.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVE380 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
In this course students learn the art and craft of editing videos from two award-winning filmmakers. The course explores techniques that can be applied in a range of non-linear editing programs, including Final Cut, Avid, and Premiere. But the main focus is not just on developing software skills, but on exploring the magic behind video modification. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Videomaking.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: DIVPVP450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, video shooting skills, editing software experience.
This internship course is ideal for highly motivated students who are interested in creative video production. Involvement includes maintaining equipment, video shooting and editing, scouting locations, assisting the video director for logistics and production purposes, and sound editing. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIITIP600 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The scope of this graduate-level course is to present new teaching methodologies made possible by a global network and the growing availability of fast and powerful communication devices. Recent technology advancements made available a range of new teaching media, for example thematic easily accessible and manageable databases, powerful graphic systems allowing HD or UHD videos and student interaction and manipulation of 3D objects such as artistic human artifacts (sculptures, paintings, etc.) or items related to the natural sciences (molecules, body parts, etc.). Connectivity available almost anywhere reduces the dependence of coursework solely in building facilities, allowing for field experiences (museums, city walks), advanced hardware and software to share course materials in the form of interactive whiteboards where instructors and students can work at the same time from any location, and widespread portable devices (smartphones, tablets) for interactive visual platforms. A major focus of the course will be on the instant and dynamic accessibility to culture and current events as opposed to the static approaches of the past. In order to make the most of these new tools, an instructor has to understand their technology and master the new ways of interactions with the students, including the participation of field experts in moderated discussion settings. Prerequisites: Open to individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree or are currently enrolled in a graduate-level program.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCDF300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Design Fundamental Studio II or equivalent Visual Communication
The aim of this course is to bring together all aspects of multimedia visual communication - from the theoretical to the practical and applying those theories in projects which involve still and moving images - photography and video, graphic design and typography. Emphasis will be placed on a design practice which is shaped by an understanding of the cultural and social aspects of communication, together with an appreciation of the power of images and words. Guest speakers and site visits have an important role in this hands-on course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCMM375 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Multimedia Studio I or equivalent.
Multimedia Studio focuses on the experience of producing complete contemporary artistic multimedia works in a project-based environment. Through a variety of media-related hardware and software, hands-on learning and practice students acquire the necessary skills for their advanced projects. An integral part of this course focuses on video mapping and provides students with practical exercises and selected reading that enhance the acquisition of theoretical concepts relevant to all digital arts and to video mapping in particular. This course includes experiential learning with CEMI. Prerequisites: Multimedia Studio I or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCVC450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Italian A1 (Breakthrough or beginner) recommended but may vary depending on the placement. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work layout and illustration software experience.
Through the visual communication internship course, students will apply visual and aesthetic inspiration and strategies to creative projects. Students will assist the visual communication staff of the placement organization (i.e. marketing and graphic design teams for companies or freelancers) to develop the visual component of communications-based projects. Tasks may include assisting with items and tasks related to graphic design, photography and video assignments, and websites in formats such as e-newsletters, communication strategies and proposals, flyers, presentations, logos, and brochures. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAD250 | Section: I | Open
This course is an introduction to accessory design. Students will be exposed to a variety of design materials. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional sketching and on creative detail design of: footwear, handbags (including embellished evening bags), small leather goods, gloves, and belts. The course includes a historical overview of personal accessories from ancient Egypt to the present. Field trips will include: trade fairs, a leather factory and the Ferragamo Museum.

Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAD255 | Section: I | Open
This course is dedicated to accessory design. Students will be exposed to a variety of design materials. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional sketching and on creative detail design for footwear, handbags, small leather goods, gloves, and belts. The course includes an historical overview of personal accessories from ancient Egypt to the present, allowing the evaluation of different materials and styles. During this course students will also receive basic guidelines on hand sewing techniques, on the use of patterns for simple leather accessories, and an overview of materials. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADFP350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADLT340 | Open
This course offers the opportunity to study several ornamentation techniques: trapunto, welting, pleating, inlay, weaving. Students learn the different methods of application on leather apparel and on accessories such as handbags, belts and shoes, and acquire basic pattern making skills related to leather garments. This semester class will introduce the student to the subject and then focus on the area of study.

This course is intensive and practical and includes cutting, preparing, sewing and assembly. Also, it provides a real insight into the leather process in a workshop.

An asset of the class is the opportunity to showcase student work at FLY, the non-profit retail store of FAST, alongside professional emerging designers based in Italy. All works produced by students will be featured with garment specifications, photographed, and published for promo- tion on school websites. Garments will undergo a selection process for in-store and classroom placement. Furthermore, FAST experiential learning and internship students will then utilize these items to create window displays and other special installations throughout the season. For this reason, it is not possible for students to take garments, accessories, and the like home upon course completion. In the event that a garment is sold, all profits will go to- ward FUA scholarship funds for future FAST students.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDDK300 | Closed
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Knitwear Design, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The history between computers and textile design goes back to when the first Jacquard Loom machine was invented. In this course, students discover how computers and knitting machines are connected through the exploration of knitwear software and the home knitting machine. By combining these elements and other digital tools (Adobe Photoshop as well as other image editing software), students will be able to execute complex patterns using different colors, working with electronic knitting machines, to gain a better understanding of how the Jacquard process works. Through a series of exercises and lectures, students investigate electronic knitting machine functions and learn how to create and convert patterns on computers using software and load them on knitting machine, calculate and design patterns, and using traditional techniques of trims and garment assembly to make their final capsule collection.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCCF390 | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion majors, Junior standing. Unofficial transcript submission required.
In this course students learn the steps involved in managing and producing fashion shows featuring designer collections and seasonal trends. Topics cover logistics, budget management, fashion show categories, creativity and art direction, broadcasting and promoting shows, and the role of the show within the business aspects of the fashion industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFB300 | Open
This course aims to discuss the complex art of operating fashion businesses in Italy. Topics addresses the dynamics of interacting with designers, buyers, and retail managers, and identify effective ways of conducting negotiations, solving issues, and closing a deal. Coursework will give students a significant exposure to the world of fashion in Italy by analyzing both its rich panorama made up of traditions, humble origins, and the current multinational brands dominating the international market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFI290 | Open
This course features a sociological journey in recent history as seen through the lives and styles of the most influential people of the twentieth century from Jacqueline Kennedy to Lada Gaga, from celebrity fashion designers to recent stylists and influencers. Fashion icons from varying backgrounds and occupations, such as Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Queen Elisabeth II, Madonna, as well as their Italian counterparts, will be analyzed. The aim of the course is to identify the roles and identities represented by female fashion icons and how they are perceived today in terms of current fashion ideologies, lifestyle, and social changes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFP310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Photography or equivalent, Intermediate Photography (film or digital) or equivalent.
Through this course, students meet and collaborate with designers, art directors, hair and make-up teams, and professional models to come up with a specific fashion ad campaign and lookbook for up-and-coming Florentine designers in the field of fashion. Students will learn how to meet with clients, present ideas (story and mood boards), design sets, and execute a campaign according to client needs. The course examines studio and location lighting, flash units, light metering, and set design according to a specific project. Photography software is utilized at an advanced level to process and produce a final campaign and portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: PSELCV205 | Section: II | Open
This introductory course provides students with a basic knowledge of creative video production and its technical aspects. Students will learn basic video shooting and editing techniques. As a part of the coursework, students will work in groups on video projects in order to experience the various phases of video production from scripting to editing and final output.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be
involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDAD320 | Open
This course offers a solid foundation in the fundamentals of basic
construction, draping techniques, alterations and fitting techniques for
apparel. the emphasis of the course is on the importance of proper fit
and craftsmanship. Students develop and construct design concepts
in muslin and soft fabric on the dress form.

Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFC355 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion Design Major Junior Standing or equivalent skills in sketching, sewing, and patternmaking. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course teaches students how to create and develop fashion collections for diverse markets by using appropriate research techniques, project development methods, sketching and rendering techniques. Collections will be structured and organized in a professional manner from customer research and trend forecasting to the creation of mood boards and the selection of materials and colors. Throughout the course students will be invited to develop and test communication skills in order to learn how to assertively communicate collections values. The ultimate goal of the course is to design, create, and prototype a final collection. Field visits to museums and fashion design studios will stimulate the student's creativity and are an essential part of the course. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFP350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This placement allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. This special project involves proposing, designing, and producing high quality garments and accessories for FLY, whose merchandise sales generate scholarships for future fashion students and represent the categories of emerging Italian designers, high quality vintage, and items created through the academic outcomes of FUA students and faculty. Duties include but are not limited to merchandise analysis for brainstorming, design proposals, and garment and accessory production in the laboratory spaces of FAST, the academic department that houses FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, portfolio of previous work, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFS350 | Open
What does it mean to be a stylist in a digital first world, where everybody has a voice and the opportunity to deliver across multiple platforms? This course is focused on the role and significance of a fashion stylist in the broader industry, as a cultural gatekeeper, storyteller, talent spotter and curators of ideas. Students will understand the variety of roles that a stylist can undertake, with a detailed study of styling for Editorial, Fashion Shows, Celebrities, Advertising, Brand Marketing and E-Commerce. Hands on work with designers' garments is provided to students to create sets for fashion shootings and fashion shows. Ultimate goal of this course is to educate the students' eyes to identify and manage the visual impact of trends and ideas. Case studies will be provided, revealing the creative process of relevant stylists of the industry, and explaining concept development from the initial idea to the finished shoot.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFB330 | Section: I | Open
This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyze the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base.

Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFB335 | Section: I | Open
This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyze the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all- encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM280 | Open
This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the brand in today's consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behavior and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and experience shopping - visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFM360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The world of global fashion is becoming increasingly complex as the market evolves. This course is designed to respond to the challenges presented by the competitive environment that the fashion industry is facing. Students will acquire knowledge on how to develop strategic fashion marketing plans in order to respond to continuous economic and environmental changes. In addition, students will learn how different business environments require equally different strategic and competitive behavior from the players involved. A number of fashion business case studies will be analyzed with a particular emphasis on the Italian market. Branding and brand management will be an integral part of the course, especially with regards to how brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. The course explores how successful marketers develop, manage, and protect brands. A focus on successful case histories, visits to fashion enterprises, as well as case analyses will complete the course and help students gain practical examples of how markets adapt and grow in this highly competitive industry. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fashion Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMRO350 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMRO355 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT300 | Open
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is to have students familiarize with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop the creative potential present in every human being. During the class meetings students will use their own personal experiences to help them to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context: students will in effect conduct experiments on themselves. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common items, such as buttons, boxes, leaves and so on. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. All these essential elements which make up the created image - space, color, movement and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one;s inner world. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEAT304 | Open
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is for students to become familiar with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop creative expressions. During class meetings, students will use their own personal experiences by conducting direct experiments to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course, students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common objects. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. The essential elements that compose the created image - space, color, movement, and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one's inner world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The objectives of this special project are based on creating an opportunity for the student to observe and participate in the coordinating and curating activities of an art gallery. Students will be exposed to various tasks including daily operations, exhibitions, catalog creation, show installation, and interaction with local and international artists. The student will also assist the on-site curator with promotional tasks ranging from press releases to social networking. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGA450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course involves students in the curating activities of a professional fine arts gallery. Students will collaborate with curators and gallery managers on the organizational and operational tasks of developing, organizing, and implementing an art exhibition. Interaction with local and international artists will be a fundamental aspect of the internship, and duties will range from logistical preparation, administrative duties for the gallery management, promotion and press documentation, and other tasks assigned by the organization. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the student preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Ceramics | Course #: FACECE200 | Open
In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. In the first part of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. In the second part of the course, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing. Slide lectures will give students essential information on the nature of clay and glazes. the history of Mediterranean ceramics will be covered during in-class lectures. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAP350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Intermediate Painting
This is a rigorous course which allows advanced students to work on individual projects, developing their strengths, and working on areas of weakness. Student will emerge from the course not only having developed a personal language but also having attained a high level of technical competence in traditional methods and materials. Students will also have considerable practice time in non-traditional techniques and methods. challenging individual critiques are an important component of this course and out-of-town field trips, including the Museum of contemporary art in Prato, are included.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAT300 | Open
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is for students to become familiar with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop creative expressions. During class meetings, students will use their own personal experiences by conducting direct experiments to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course, students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common objects. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. The essential elements that compose the created image - space, color, movement, and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one's inner world.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDAT304 | Open
This lecture/lab course introduces students to the therapeutic functions of art. The aim is for students to become familiar with art therapy methods and techniques whose primary objective is to develop creative expressions. During class meetings, students will use their own personal experiences by conducting direct experiments to understand the function of art within a therapeutic context. This hands-on experience will then be compared with the theoretical ideas outlined in the required readings. In the laboratory/studio part of the course, students will handle a great variety of art materials ranging from the more traditional to less common objects. The aim is to facilitate self-expression on a non-verbal and creative level and in a safe environment, open to the free exchange of opinions and untouched by prejudiced or judgmental attitudes. The essential elements that compose the created image - space, color, movement, and form - will be examined and put to the test as expressive and symbolic tools of one's inner world. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFD120 | Open
Working from still life, the natural and urban surroundings of the city of Florence and figure models, the student will learn the basic techniques of drawing, perspective, proportion, and composition. Students will explore the different media of drawing: pencil, charcoal, pen and ink. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFP120 | Open
This course teaches beginning students the fundamental principles and techniques of painting, focusing on oil painting with concentration on human figures and still-life. Students will learn the build-up of form, tone and color on a two-dimensional surface. Practical demonstrations are supplemented by slide lectures and visits to Florentine museums to view oil paintings first hand. Group and individual critiques are an integral part of the course.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFP200 | Open
The aim of this combined studio art/lecture course is to introduce fresco painting (wall painting) to students who have not necessarily studied art history or acquired any form of artistic training. This course explains what fresco painting is and why it became one of the most important painting techniques in Renaissance Italy. Using a radically new and exciting approach to understanding this painting technique and the historical and political contexts in which these masterpieces were created, students will leave the course with a unique understanding of frescoes and their golden age. The primary focus of this course is to provide students with an intimate experience of how a fresco is created. They will be handling the basic ingredients of fresco painting, i.e. sand, lime, stone, stucco and mineral pigments, to create their own frescoes using traditional techniques. The aim of this course is an understanding of fresco technique and therefore focuses on process rather than the final product. An integral part of the course are the site visits to ascend the scaffolding in Florentine churches and palaces to witness at first hand the restoration of great fresco cycles normally closed to the public.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFS225 | Open
This course is designed to take full advantage of the student's unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channeled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significant and visual interest ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists for centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

Contact Hours: 45

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this placement, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this placement, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP470 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPCC360 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of the traditional methods of producing cookies and petit fours. The course will explore the preparation and design of unfilled and filled cookies and mignardises. Topics covered include the creaming method, depositing cookies (sliced, dropped, spritz, rolled, and bar), as well as methods of mixing, shaping, baking, filling, finishing, storing, packaging, pricing, and distributing cookies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPCS630 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Advanced Chocolate Artistry or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Pastry art competitions are fundamental milestones in the career of a professional pastry chef. Chocolate sculpture competitions are by far the most challenging field where artistic abilities and technical skills play a major role. This course offers students the knowledge needed to join the world of international chocolate competitions by covering the entire process of competition sculpture from design to creation. The international evaluation standards will be analyzed and will be the starting point of the creative plan developed by students to present in competition: dimension and proportion, applied color percentage, balance of the various elements, sugar decorations application, cleanliness of the work, theme recognizability, and more. Students will learn how to produce their own resin, plaster and PVC molds, while all other operations will be rigorously hand-made. Special emphasis will be placed on a variety of different techniques such as carving, hand-modeling, hydro-free butter application, and piping-painting. Students will learn the guidelines for the choice of suitable colors to be applied in relation to a specific theme. The course will include also the application of basic geometry and physics principles in order to guarantee the balance and stability of the sculpture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPDS480 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
The aim of the course is to give students the fundamentals of
dessert presentation. Starting from fruit cutting skills, students will experience a variety of decoration techniques to be applied to mignons, single portion desserts, and tortes. Glazes and gelaces, buttercream, whipped cream, icings, and chocolate and caramel decorations will be explained and practiced to gain confidence with related techniques. Students will experience both classic and contemporary decoration methods ranging from piping skills to the application of specific equipment for royal-icing writing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute decorating and styling techniques and to develop their own personal plating style.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPPS355 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course is a study of bakery operations and management as
practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the baking industry. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory
in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPRD670 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Master Italian Pastry Arts II or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Creating original and innovative recipes is one of the main goals of a professional pastry chef. New recipes need to meet the market needs and pastry chefs must be able to understand trends as well as develop a personal style.
The aim of this course is to provide students with the instruments to develop new and innovative recipes.
Creativity is not only a matter of new ideas: new recipes need knowledge of the basic ingredients and how they can be combined, besides the standard classic applications. Students will approach the basics of food pairing, a branch of culinary science used by most professionals today in order to broaden the possible flavors combinations. This course provides students with a solid knowledge of the chemistry behind single preparations, whether traditional or contemporary. Through the lectures students will be guided into a new perspective of ingredients and their interaction.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACA450 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, students of the culinary arts internship course are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Interns must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on the weekend and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACA450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, students of the culinary arts internship course are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Interns must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on the weekend and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
6.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACC455 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Professional Cooking I or equivalent.
The course focuses on the techniques and cooking methods applied in the professional kitchen: ingredients will be examined for their features and unique traits. Special emphasis will be placed on ingredient structure and cooking methods. Students will analyze a significant selection of meats and fish. Butchering and fish filleting skills will be covered. Ingredient handling and storing, suitable cooking methods, ingredient pairing, and an introduction to food presentation and plating will be addressed. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCACC485 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Professional Cooking II: Cooking Techniques or equivalent.
This course is intended to give advanced students the fundamentals of kitchen organization, menu composition, plating and decoration as well as consolidate their attitudes and skills thanks to full-immersion hands-on activities that will result in effective professional and personal growth, and introduce them to the concept of team work, timing and responsibility within the kitchen environment. The course is open to all students with a good experience in kitchen basics like knife skills, vegetables, meat and egg preparation, application of classic cooking methods and knowledge of main Italian ingredients. Students will have the opportunity to practice cooking techniques and basic kitchen organization skills on a daily basis. Students will be followed by the chef instructor, who will be their mentor in this restaurant cooking experience. The course will develop students skills in dish and menu composition, as well as in building combinations of ingredients based on the legacy of Italian tradition. To do this students will analyze the role of the leading Italian chefs of the last decades and their cooking styles in order to understand their influence on the development of Italian cuisine. The course will be held in the school's creative learning lab where students will put the learned techniques in practice for the preparation of an Italian cuisine menu. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Professional Cooking II: Cooking Techniques or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCANC450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis.
Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts.
Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNHN150 | Open
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFC240 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italy-culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFJ300 | Open
Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don't always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFJ304 | Open
Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don't always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community. Service learning is a method that incorporates intentional learning with service to the community, in which the service component functions as a reflection on classroom learning for all tasks performed. In addition to regular class hours, students will be involved in a volunteer project for the entire session that integrates them in the local community in order to remove barriers and gain a sense of social responsibility. The acquisition of new skills and knowledge obtained in the service learning environment outside the classroom will enrich the learning experience and contribute to personal and emotional growth, as well as cultural consciousness, to develop a greater sense of a global citizenship and sensitivity to the needs of others. Students are guided through the experience by the non-profit association supervisor and the service learning coordinator to enhance outcomes both inside and outside the classroom. The contribution to the association is not only crucial to a deeper understanding of course topics but also allows for a greater sense of belonging in the community, allowing for students to acquire a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence that enhances the classroom learning experience.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCIF285 | Open
The course engages the student in the exploration of the history and culture of the French and Italian Riviera, a region that still today preserves a peculiar identity, and builds a bridge between the Mediterranean and Northern Europe. Strategically placed in the north of the Mediterranean, Provence and the city of Nice have always attracted civilizations from all over. Throughout its long history, people of many nationalities have docked here and been assimilated into the city, turning it into a cultural and culinary melting pot: Greeks, Romans, North Africans, Corsicans, Sicilians, Arabs, have all left their mark. The course examines the many culinary identities of the area creating a unique culinary cornucopia of different cultures and flavors, as seen in establishments such as restaurants, markets, boulangeries, Maghreb spice stalls, Mediterranean fishmongers, and Sub-Saharan vegetable vendors. The course also focuses on the relevance that the area had in the development of Europe. During the Middle Age, in monasteries and abbeys, the roots of cultural and religious traditions of Europe were continued. Furthermore, thanks to the work of the monks, the techniques of agriculture and viticulture were preserved and improved. Two of the great ancient pilgrimage routes have their start in Provence, the Camino de Santiago (Way of Saint James), through the Roman Via Aurelia to Santiago di Compostela, and the Via Francigena, which leads from France to Rome. Places of culinary, historical, and religious relevance, such as ethnic restaurants and local markets, archaeological sites, and monasteries, will be studied in order to contextualize an interdisciplinary understanding of the culture and history of the Italian and French Riviera. Group discussions and personal research assignments are essential forms of re-elaborating the course topics. The course emphasizes the development and evolution of religion, its connection to food, and their heritage in the contemporary society. This course includes cooking labs, food and wine tastings, and visits.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCSF250 | Open
Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Food Technology & Management | Course #: HPFBRM392 | Section: I | Open
This course examines the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organization and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organization and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organized. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community.In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management


Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEPP470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Wine Appreciation I or equivalent.
This course presents a practical and technical approach grounded in understanding the direct relationship and reactions between components, flavors, and textures. This approach uses sensory analysis to help the student identify key elements that affect pairings. concrete examples include menu analysis and tasting notes from the Apicius culinary brigade, who will prepare the recipes utilized in class. the direct food and wine paring analysis in class will culminate in a complete eon-gastronomical, regional, and cultural context. Wines and recipes from the new and the old worlds will offer to students a real perspective of the identity concept in the world of
eon-gastronomy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEVE450 | Open
Students will be learning directly from wine procedures through a series
of trips. The following types of wine will be studied: light bodied white
wines, wooded and full-bodied white wines, sparkling wines, sweet
table wines, light bodied red wines, medium bodied red wines, full
bodied red wines, fortified wines, and oakey wines. the course will cover
the chemistry and analysis of wine, the changes brought about with
aging, faults in wine and the manipulation of wine. the itinerant course
includes visits to: Distillerie Nardini (Veneto - grappa), Prunotto
(Piemonte - Barolo and Barbaresco), Marchesi Antinori at the Tignanello
Estate (Tuscany - the first Super Tuscan), Montevertine (Tuscany - the
real Sangiovese), loacker biodynamic wines (Tuscany - Brunello Di
Montalcino, Bolgheri), and Berlucchi (Lombardia - sparkling wines).
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWA340 | Open
This course provides the fundamental skills and a technical introduction to wine tasting beginning with the visual, olfactory, and gustatory examination. Students will learn to analyze the organoleptic components of wines, the importance and influences attributed by to territory, and finally how to distinguish as well as create excellent food and wine pairings. Lectures will be supplemented by wine tasting workshops. The objective of this class is for students to be able to recognize quality in wines from around the world and obtain a working knowledge of international wine regions and as well as the wine industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWC380 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on the business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will consider and analyze course topics including an introduction to communication theory, wine communication practices and trends, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing strategies, economics of the world wine industry, and human resource management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWC385 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on the business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will consider and analyze course topics including an introduction to communication theory, wine communication practices and trends, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing strategies, economics of the world wine industry, and human resource management. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 56
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWS350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management special project will be acquire and practice skills related to managing the wine and beverage service at GANZO, the school restaurant and creative learning lab of Apicius International School of Hospitality. Under the leadership and supervision of wine service professionals, students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a restaurant and/or wineries. The aim of the special project is to increase knowledge of wine service, presentation methods, restaurant procedures, wine expertise, and pairing in the hospitality industry. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWS350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management special project will be acquire and practice skills related to managing the wine and beverage service at GANZO, the school restaurant and creative learning lab of Apicius International School of Hospitality. Under the leadership and supervision of wine service professionals, students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a restaurant and/or wineries. The aim of the special project is to increase knowledge of wine service, presentation methods, restaurant procedures, wine expertise, and pairing in the hospitality industry. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWW460 | Open
Pre-requisite: Wines of the World I or equivalent.
This course continues the journey of world wines by focusing on the countries of the New World in order to further develop students' skills as a wine taster. The countries to be studied are: Hungary, United States of America (with a special emphasis on California), Australia and South Africa, as well as New Zealand, Chile and Argentina. Students will participate in comparative tastings to be able to conduct a critical analysis of wines produced in different parts of the New World, with the usual emphasis on the relationship between sensory properties of the wines and factors associated with their place of origin.
Contact Hours: 45

Global Studies

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCA300 | Open
This course focuses on the forces that shape cultures and societies. The following topics will be explored: our relationship to our environments, systems of social organization, social rules of law, politics, economics, religion, language and social practices. Students will come to an understanding of human variations through the study of people as social and cultural beings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI202 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI202 | Section: I | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANWA300 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GAHSYT300 | Open
Pre-requisite: An introductory yoga course or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is aimed to offer students already possessing a solid foundation of yoga knowledge and practice the tools to use the therapeutic functions of Hatha yoga in overcoming physical, mental, and emotional distress. Students will become familiar with health, wellness, and stress management topics through yoga practice in a therapeutic context. Through the hands-on approach to asanas, pranayama breathing exercises, and meditation techniques, students understand how to integrate yoga as a complementary treatment to medicine and a vital role in maintaining a healthy body and mind. The constant practice of awareness and observation combined with an analysis of anatomy and physiology applied to common pains and distresses will development the application of yoga therapy in individual and group contexts throughout the duration of the course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSHN150 | Open
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSWA300 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGIF285 | Open
The course engages the student in the exploration of the history and culture of the French and Italian Riviera, a region that still today preserves a peculiar identity, and builds a bridge between the Mediterranean and Northern Europe. Strategically placed in the north of the Mediterranean, Provence and the city of Nice have always attracted civilizations from all over. Throughout its long history, people of many nationalities have docked here and been assimilated into the city, turning it into a cultural and culinary melting pot: Greeks, Romans, North Africans, Corsicans, Sicilians, Arabs, have all left their mark. The course examines the many culinary identities of the area creating a unique culinary cornucopia of different cultures and flavors, as seen in establishments such as restaurants, markets, boulangeries, Maghreb spice stalls, Mediterranean fishmongers, and Sub-Saharan vegetable vendors. The course also focuses on the relevance that the area had in the development of Europe. During the Middle Age, in monasteries and abbeys, the roots of cultural and religious traditions of Europe were continued. Furthermore, thanks to the work of the monks, the techniques of agriculture and viticulture were preserved and improved. Two of the great ancient pilgrimage routes have their start in Provence, the Camino de Santiago (Way of Saint James), through the Roman Via Aurelia to Santiago di Compostela, and the Via Francigena, which leads from France to Rome. Places of culinary, historical, and religious relevance, such as ethnic restaurants and local markets, archaeological sites, and monasteries, will be studied in order to contextualize an interdisciplinary understanding of the culture and history of the Italian and French Riviera. Group discussions and personal research assignments are essential forms of re-elaborating the course topics. The course emphasizes the development and evolution of religion, its connection to food, and their heritage in the contemporary society. This course includes cooking labs, food and wine tastings, and visits.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGNN350 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrante's four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italy's complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italy's Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGSH300 | Open
#MeToo has rapidly moved from a social media hashtag to an international movement that demands changes in society towards how and what we view as sexual harassment. The power of the internet has become an integral tool in promoting empowerment through empathy by bringing together individuals that have been subject to harassment, and by exposing the predators that have exploited their power through pressure as well as force. This course aims to present a comprehensive history of sexual harassment to give the student a better understanding of how past events have contributed to the current movement. Examination of how the shifting standards of the 21st century have created a foundation for new definitions of acceptable behavior will provide an important tool for critical analysis of conduct between genders. Evaluation of sexual harassment in gender relations will create new perspectives and sensitivity to the current movement as a way reinforce #MeToo, not just an assessment of a viral trend, but as a tipping point in contemporary society.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGSR350 | Open
Beginning with an examination of the "how to" advice manuals common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, to conception and childbirth, and an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy may have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Discussions will take cue from Renaissance art in which erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGWL290 | Open
This course will explore love and romantic relationships through the words of notable individuals from the past. The letters written by great men and women - poets, novelists, musicians, philosophers, politicians, kings and queens - to their loved ones will provide an opportunity for students to examine the evolution of romantic relationships from the ancient Roman times to modern days, with a special focus dedicated to the 18th and 19th century. Through reading, analyzing, and discussing love letters and other background materials, students will explore the ties between the experience of love and its expression through the means of writing as a characteristic trait of human interaction, from an historical, social, cross-cultural, and literary point of view.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Peace Studies | Course #: GSPSEG340 | Open
Is globalization good or bad? For whom? Will it go away or is it here to stay? Do I need to worry about it? Globalization-freer trade, improved communications, travel, and transportation-together with the information revolution have created new moral challenges and intensified some existing ones across the planet. In reviewing the pros and cons of globalization, we will consider arguments from philosophers, economists, businessmen, labor leaders, environmentalists, journalists, etc., as they examine north-south relations, economic development, population growth and migration, environmental questions, and the state of international law concerning security, the flow of trade, of ideas, and of people.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Peace Studies | Course #: GSPSEW330 | Open
The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamental moral theories and standards and to encourage their application - through mechanisms of moral reflection and judgment - to ethical problems arising throughout the world. The course is articulated through a large number and variety of studies of moral cases drawn from various parts of the world which will bring the student to confront prescriptive moral theories with some degree of sophistication. Our study of such matters as the French legislation against veils in schools, reproductive rights in Italy, U.S. drug laws and Iranian censorship vs. the value of liberty-will inevitably result in meta-ethical reflections, that is, thinking about the nature of morality and the limits of our moral judgment. The students' participation in class discussion is a fundamental element of this class.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Peace Studies | Course #: GSPSHR280 | Open
Only in 20th century the international community has progressively
elaborated rules and procedures to state that certain behaviors are
crimes and to make possible the punishment of those committing these acts. The course will provide an introduction to the birth, evolution and contemporary challenges of human rights, humanitarian law and the international systems to maintain peace or restore justice. It aims at offering an overview of the history of Human Rights from their appearance on international scene to contemporary debates; it will analyze the process of definition of crimes against Humanity, crimes against Peace, War crimes and genocide and the mechanisms to protect Humanitarian law: from the emergency logic of Newberg trial after World War II to the institutionalization of International Criminal Justice and the various typologies of humanitarian interventions: Peacekeeping, Peace-making, Peace-enforcing.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSDF340 | Open
This course will examine excerpts of Dante Alighieri's greatest passages from the Divine Comedy and other works in relation to the space and history of Florence. Textual analyses will be performed, unpacking the dense symbolism and motifs reflective of the intellectual and moral climate during 14th century Florence. Students will visit churches, piazzas, and palaces within the city and will examine these locations in the context of Dante's life and surrounding controversy, the accusations and denunciations in his writings, the physical descriptions of the city, and the characters and historical figures present in his works. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSFW280 | Open
This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces both visible and invisible the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSWA300 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45

Horticulture

3.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HCGHHT350 | Open
Coming soon!
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HCGHHT350 | Section: I | Open
Coming soon!
Contact Hours: 45

Hospitality

3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTCM360 | Open
Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and la Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been created and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropoli and developing destinations will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTEO440 | Open
This course aims to develop event competency in order to effectively plan, coordinate, direct, and run special event operations. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for effective event and project management and leadership. During the course, students will examine the complexity of the event industry from a managerial point of view, focusing on the multifaceted nature of event planning within a project management context. Effective strategies and methods are discussed to successfully plan and manage a multitude of event sizes and types while underlining the economic and financial components. The administrative aspects of an event company from the management of the financial records to the compliance with legal requirements will be carefully examined during this course. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHM350 | Open
Takes a practical approach to introducing students to the marketing of hotels, restaurants and clubs. Market segmentation, marketing research, advertising, public relations, promotions, packaging, pricing strategies, revenue maximization, travel purchasing systems and the future of hospitality marketing will be examined.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in front of the house hospitality operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the guidance of the Ganzo management, students will gain firsthand practice of customer relations and satisfaction, service, food and beverage operations, collaborative and interpersonal communication between FOH and BOH, and above all practice hospitality skills in an international context. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in front of the house hospitality operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the guidance of the Ganzo management, students will gain firsthand practice of customer relations and satisfaction, service, food and beverage operations, collaborative and interpersonal communication between FOH and BOH, and above all practice hospitality skills in an international context. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHO450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHR350 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for people whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional Human Resources. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIN320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Hospitality or equivalent.
This course examines the development of international tourism from its historic beginnings to current growth. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of tourism marketing and structures, the role of governments in international tourism, the effect of tourism in a country's infrastructure and society, and the impact of tourism in developing countries.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTMC360 | Open
This course explores the Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Event (MICE) sector as increasingly important for the tourism industry. This course introduces students to the specific characteristics of the MICE sector, including impacts for tourism development, conference marketing, management of meetings and conferences. Students will assess the range of operational and management tasks necessary in order to manage these events successfully.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO350 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO355 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTSE411 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: C1 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This internship course exposes students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies in the special event industry. The aforementioned areas will be employed through the application of hospitality management and proper procedures and strategies related to event management. Students will learn how to identify event trends and client preferences in Italy. Topics will include booking, entertainment, event programming and coordination, themes, and sponsorships. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTSE430 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive analysis of the wedding planning process from wedding consultation through to the political, cultural, economic, and religious influence on weddings, with an additional focus on Italian traditions and customs. During the course, students will have the opportunity to visit and inspect prestigious wedding venues of Florence. Interactive sessions with practical training are organized throughout the course in order for students to develop the necessary knowledge and communication skills needed to pursue a career in this industry. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PSELWC385 | Section: I | Open
This course focuses on the business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will consider and analyze course topics including an introduction to communication theory, wine communication practices and trends, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing strategies, economics of the world wine industry, and human resource management. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PSELWC480 | Section: III | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts majors only. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside of the Mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important cultural macro areas. Students will experience food preparation based on the customs and heritage of diverse cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course. The aim is to show how the environment and external cultural influences have a strong impact on local cuisines. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLEM400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Hospitality Marketing or equivalent.
An in-depth study of Internet Web site hosting for tourism managers,
including a detailed examination of the current practices of on-line
tourism marketing and tourism destination management systems.
covered topics include advanced course investigating sales tactics
and procedures used in hospitality sales environment, the practical
application role plays and skills practice, and planning and managing
e-commerce for hospitality global distribution systems including major
opportunities, limitations, issues and risks from managerial perspectives
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLHM430 | Section: I | Open
This course examines two critical areas of hospitality management, management operations and front office procedures. In the first section students will regard the industry from a managerial perspective by covering the business procedures, accounting controls, legal issues, policies and controls employed in order to effectively operate hospitality structures such as hotels, resorts, restaurants, and clubs. The second half of the course focuses on front office procedures - business
flow, reservations processes, revenue management, accounting,
internal control, night audit, and computer systems for guest
management. Housekeeping operations, guest accounts, room
management, and other services will also be studied in a service oriented context.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLHM435 | Section: I | Open
This course examines two critical areas of hospitality management such as management operations and front office procedures. In the first part of the course, students will examine the industry from a managerial perspective by covering the business procedures, accounting controls, legal issues, and policies. Such topics are necessary in order to effectively manage hospitality structures such as hotels, resorts, restaurants, and clubs. The second half of the course focuses on front office procedures from business flow to reservation processes, revenue management, accounting, internal control, night audit, and computer systems for guest management. Housekeeping operations, guest accounts, room management, and other services will also be studied from a service-oriented perspective. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHLHO450 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHTSE350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this special project course is to expose students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies. The aforementioned strategies will be employed from the perspective of hospitality management and the application of program techniques in special event management. Topics will include booking, event programming and coordination, themes, program partnerships, and event promotion. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHTSE350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this special project course is to expose students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies. The aforementioned strategies will be employed from the perspective of hospitality management and the application of program techniques in special event management. Topics will include booking, event programming and coordination, themes, program partnerships, and event promotion. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBHO450 | Open
Pre-requisite: A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students of the hospitality internship course will be introduced to hospitality management and operations through internships in hotels, restaurants, and wine bars in Florence, under the guidance of experienced professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a hotel/restaurant/enoteca, and will acquire valuable experience in the areas of management procedures and client relations in the hospitality industry. Hotel and hospitality marketing may be included within the tasks which are assigned to the students. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBOM400 | Open
This course introduces one of the fundamental areas of study in the
hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of
food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets,
effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles.
Cost calculations, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget
forecasting, labor costs, service payment systems, and other topic specific
areas will be covered.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBOM405 | Open
This course introduces one of the fundamental areas of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculations, menu planning, storage, and receiving.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBRM350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Resume indicating at least one previous restaurant experience. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course will focus on the basic understanding of restaurant management, including service management and customer relations, menu planning, and wine list development under the supervision of wine experts. Students will observe and analyze the main operational areas of the restaurant such as food safety and sanitation, guest services, operational responsibilities, and staff communication. Moreover, students will learn how to maintain daily records of customers, sales and costs, as well as produce monthly records. Students will assist the manager in setting service standards and creating a platform for all restaurant operations in accordance with restaurant needs. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. .
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBRM350 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Resume indicating at least one previous restaurant experience. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course will focus on the basic understanding of restaurant management, including service management and customer relations, menu planning, and wine list development under the supervision of wine experts. Students will observe and analyze the main operational areas of the restaurant such as food safety and sanitation, guest services, operational responsibilities, and staff communication. Moreover, students will learn how to maintain daily records of customers, sales and costs, as well as produce monthly records. Students will assist the manager in setting service standards and creating a platform for all restaurant operations in accordance with restaurant needs. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. .
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBSF250 | Open
Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBWC380 | Section: I | Open
Business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will be presented with the following topics: an introduction to communication theory, wine communication, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing, economics of the world wine industry, human resource management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBWC385 | Section: I | Open
Business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will be presented with the following topics: an introduction to communication theory, wine communication, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing, economics of the world wine industry, human resource management. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community.
In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved
in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELMC550 | Section: IV | Open
The course offers students an overview of Mediterranean cuisine by identifying and analyzing different macro areas starting from their historical and cultural backgrounds. The diverse cuisines of the countries bordering the Mediterranean sea, their mutual and external influences, and the lore developed throughout the centuries will be thoroughly covered. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and representative techniques of important Mediterranean cuisines. This course consists of experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELMM380 | Section: I | Open
Pre-requisite: Multimedia Studio I or equivalent.
The second level of the multimedia studio course focuses on the experience of producing complete, contemporary multimedia works in an artistic, project-based environment. Through a variety of media-related hardware and software, hands-on practice, and instructor supervision, students acquire the necessary skills for advanced-level projects. The creative process is emphasized as an individual process in order for students to develop mature visual identities and expressions in multimedia contexts. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Multimedia Studio I or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELOM405 | Open
This course introduces a fundamental area of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, and the effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculation, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget forecasting,
labor costs, service payment systems, and other topic-specific areas will be
covered.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community.
In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved
in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local
population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as
well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who
track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor
and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative.
This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real
enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELPS355 | Section: I | Open
This course is a study of bakery operations and management
as practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the baking industry.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: PSELRM392 | Section: I | Open
This course examines the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organization and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organization and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organized.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Spa Management | Course #: HPSMHM350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this placement is to expose students to the principles of spa management with an emphasis on daily spa operations. Students will gain first-hand experience through analytical observation and participation in the management of the on-campus spa, Sorgiva, a full-service spa, health, and wellness facility. Students will develop the managerial skills necessary to act as a spa manager, and will be familiarized with planning and organizing all the relevant activities and operations of the wellness center. This program also includes an overview of several spa treatments, as students will assist a professional massage therapist explain to customers the different techniques and spa products. EL hours may be distributed from Monday through Friday. This placement may require PM shifts. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Business casual attire for dress code. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150

Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability

3.0 Credits
Architectural Restoration & History of Architecture | Course #: IDRHAR340 | Open
This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Architectural Restoration & History of Architecture | Course #: IDRHSI215 | Open
This course provides a comprehensive survey of Italian art and architecture through five major movements in Italian history, starting from the art of the Roman Empire. The Medieval period is analyzed from its Byzantine roots and influence, which transitioned into the groundbreaking flowering of Renaissance artistic culture. Coursework will continue with the evolution of Italian art through the intellectual and emotional complexity of Mannerism, and conclude with the Baroque period sparked by the Counter-Reformation agenda of the Catholic church. The parallel development of related disciplines and the political and sociological currents during the historic era of each major movement will provide a wider perspective of Italian art and architecture throughout the centuries. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural; because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Interior and Industrial Design | Course #: IDIDID300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Interior Design
3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours)
this course is focused on the student's realization of an individual project
with the interior design of a public or private space. the emphasis of
the course is to introduce the student to the balance of the threefold
relationship between the physical, the functional and the aesthetic in
interior design. the discussion and analysis of contemporary Italian
trends in interior design form an integral part of the course. an open
critique session will follow every major project submission. Field trips are
an important part of the course.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Interior Design
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Product Design | Course #: IDPDPL300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics, Visual Communication, or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
This course is designed to give students a comprehensive overview of the techniques used to enhance packaging strategies. The course content includes: history and principles of packaging and labeling, functions of packaging, trends in packaging, planning and designing product packaging. The application of semiotics in the commercial world and in the area of packaging design as a way to communicate a brand's value and personality will also be discussed. Renowned Italian and international product packaging case studies will be examined. Students will work on individual projects and will create their own packaging solutions for a selected product or brand. This course includes Fab Lab studio hours.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sustainable Architecture and Design | Course #: IDDAAD450 | Open
Pre-requisite: An A2 level of Italian language. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course allows the student from architecture and interior design backgrounds to gain first-hand experience of professional design contexts. Internship students will practice their creative skills with studio teams or individual professionals. Tasks may include initial observations of the professional environment, working on design samples, drafting by hand or digitally, practice AutoCAD layouts and rending, and assisting the organization with logistical duties. Student involvement will not involve solo project development but require collaborative engagement within the organization's ongoing projects according to the student's skill and competency levels. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120