Florence University of the Arts
Summer 6 weeks A 2018
6 - 9 credits

Students in FUA’s 6 week summer programs select 1 to 3 courses from the elective offering for 6 – 9 credits. Courses are offered in various subjects, with opportunities to enroll in unique experiential learning courses and internships. SAI offers three Summer 6 week sessions at FUA, each with different start dates and course options: Summer A, Summer B, and Summer C. Students can choose to add a 1 week Cultural Introduction to Italy course, extending their program to 7 weeks. The traveling course, which begins in Rome, includes field study and travel research in various locations in Tuscany.


Application Deadline
February 27, 2018
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
USF student conduct form
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Broad range of courses including Italian language, history, fashion, fine arts, and literature
  • Add a 1 week traveling course
  • Internship opportunities

Program Dates
May 13, 2018 – June 22, 2018
dates may differ as a result of add-ons


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

* Contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Communications and Publishing
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Experiential Learning
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Horticulture
Hospitality
Interior and Visual Design
Internships
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BU ER FB 310 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Family enterprises have always been central to the social and economic fabric of Italy. some of the world's oldest family companies are Italian and the city of Florence represents a very important starting point for some of these. The course will explore the evolution, characteristics and significance of Italian family firms and it will also analyze the changes and trends in italian family business over the centuries and how this system with 2,000 years of history behind is reacting to an age of increasing European unity and integration, mass immigration to Italy, globalization and competition with China and India. The first part of the course will give an overview of the history of family-owned firms from the Roman empire to the present day and their role in the social, political and economic life of Italy. The second part will consider case studies in different sectors: wine and food, fashion, the automobile industry and the hospitality sector.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BU MA EF 280 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. The experiential learning component will enhance the students perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BU MA EF 285 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the world of facility operations and event management in the sport industry. The classes will focus on various aspects of both business, legal and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged with the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. The experiential learning component will enhance the students perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BU MK MM 315 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course discusses and analyzes major marketing themes and concepts. The course will focus on the influences a marketing plan has on product definition (market of reference and segment analysis), on Price, on Place (distribution channels) and on promotion. Topics include: introduction to marketing, marketing planning, product concepts and product management, segmentation, targeting and positioning, consumer buying behavior, promotional activities. The course will also discuss a valid approach to the marketing process: analysis, planning, implementation, and control of programs designed to bring about desired exchanges. with target markets for the purpose of achieving organizational objectives.

Contact Hours: 45

Communications and Publishing

3.0 Credits
Advertising | Course #: CP CR CM 360 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and la Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been created and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropoli and developing destinations will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CP MC SM 320 | Section: Sum A | Open
What do we mean by "community?" How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks (such as Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin), old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires active participation of students and a willingness to immerse in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. As a practicum, those who complete this course will know how to chat, blog, tag, wiki, avatar, comment, twitter and flicker productively - and have some notion of how these practices affect self and community.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CP MC SM 325 | Section: Sum A | Open
What do we mean by "community"? How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. Although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires the active engagement of students and a willingness to experience a full immersion in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. Students who participate in this course will actively and productively engage in established and emerging forms of social media - and have some notion of how these practices affect the self and the community. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DI PH ID 180 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.


Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DI PH ID 185 | Section: Sum A | Open
This introductory class introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. Single lens reflex camera (DSLR) as well as point and shoot cameras are allowed. This course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. Assignments, lectures, readings and excursions progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive overview of both the history of the medium and its contemporary practice. Color correction, retouching, and compositing techniques are covered and complemented by further development of digital capture and printing techniques. A digital camera of 8 - 10 megapixels minimum with an optical zoom lens of at least 3X is required. This course satisfies the general education requirements.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DI PH IP 250 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Class Requirements: iPhone or iPad with a camera; ability to purchase up to 7 different applications from the Apple application store (an Apple account with credit card must be activated before classes start).
iPhoneography is a photography concept that involves the professional use of the iPhone camera. Various iPhone apps and constant connection to the internet (either via wi-fi or cellular data) can turn an iPhone camera into a powerful, self-sustained, hand-held camera and darkroom ready to release information globally in the constantly changing digital market. Students will learn to use the iPhone camera to produce photojournalism essays, portraits, landscape, and fashion images using different iPhone applications and professional post-processing tools. The final images will be published in a dedicated class website and will be delivered to students as fine art prints for their final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DI PH LA 300 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.
The city of Florence, with its backdrop of Medieval and Renaissance buildings coupled with the varied beauty of the Tuscan countryside, will offer students a stimulating range of opportunities for landscape and architectural photography. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and the exploration of several camera format techniques, lenses as well as printing. By studying influential photographers com-positional and artistic issues of parallax, distortion and perspective will be addressed and executed through assignments. A personal vision will be nurtured and guided by the instructor for the final project in a series of
landscape/naturalistic/architectural visual context. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DI PH SP 220 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course considers how street photographers strive to capture the life and culture of city streets, searching for what Henri Cartier Bresson termed the Decisive Moment when it comes to street photography. A skilled street photographer is able to anticipate action, interaction and that microsecond when the ordinary street scene becomes an extraordinary photograph. Methods that encourages interaction between the photographer and subject are stressed. Techniques mastered by Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Costas as well as others will be examined. Students will immerse themselves in the whirl of street life in Florence as they move towards an understanding of what it takes to successfully photograph in the street.
NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.

Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: PS EL ID 185 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current
complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic
concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be
involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DI VC DF 190 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course introduces the student to the principles and basic elements of graphic design. Through a series of assignments and exercises, students will learn and practice hand, eye and problem-solving skills. Topics include: shape, basic color theory, framing, shape and color layout, formats, creative typography, logo creation, symbols and trademarks. the course focuses mainly on manual (non-computer) techniques.
Contact Hours: 45

Experiential Learning

6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL CC 355 | Section: Sum A | Open
Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL CC 455 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Professional Cooking I or equivalent.
The course focuses on the techniques and cooking methods applied in the professional kitchen: ingredients will be examined for their features and unique traits. Special emphasis will be placed on ingredient structure and cooking methods. Students will analyze a significant selection of meats and fish. Butchering and fish filleting skills will be covered. Ingredient handling and storing, suitable cooking methods, ingredient pairing, and an introduction to food presentation and plating will be addressed. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises,learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL CC 503 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Professional Cooking II: Cooking Techniques or equivalent. Please submit unofficial transcript to comply with course prerequisite.
This course provides advanced students with the fundamentals of kitchen organization, menu composition, plating, and decoration. Upon completion of the first and second levels of Italian traditional ingredients, regional cooking, and cooking techniques, students will apply these concepts to the production of complete dishes. The course will develop skills in recipe elaboration and in building ingredient pairings according to the heritage of Italian traditions. Restaurant production is scheduled as an integral part of the course. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL PC 335 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only
This course will introduce students to cooking fundamentals and is the first of a three-series course on Professional Cooking. Students will learn classic and basic techniques and their applications. Special emphasis will be placed on methods and procedures as well as sanitation and hygiene. The aim of the course is to provide students with solid foundations in terms of both knowledge and practice for a better understanding of the basic skills necessary for more advanced courses. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).�CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL RO 355 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS EL TF 507 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our senses as they interact with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order define the tools to examine flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding for appreciation. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises,learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS SP GR 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows students to interact with the local community in Florence through experiential learning in collaboration with the Community Engagement Member Institutions affiliated with Florence University of the Arts. These community projects are directly linked to the academic divisions of FUA and open to the general public in order to share academic results with the greater community. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PS SP GR 350 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows students to interact with the local community in Florence through experiential learning in collaboration with the Community Engagement Member Institutions affiliated with Florence University of the Arts. These community projects are directly linked to the academic divisions of FUA and open to the general public in order to share academic results with the greater community. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Fashion | Course #: PS EL SF 365 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: PS SP GE 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
Introduces all aspects of the working of an art gallery. Students will be involved in curating and marketing art shows and auctions through a community and on campus promotions.This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.


Contact Hours: 150

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FT AD AD 250 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course is an introduction to accessory design. Students will be exposed to a variety of design materials. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional sketching and on creative detail design of: footwear, handbags (including embellished evening bags), small leather goods, gloves, and belts. The course includes a historical overview of personal accessories from ancient Egypt to the present. Field trips will include: trade fairs, a leather factory and the Ferragamo Museum.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FT FC VM 325 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course examines the creative field of visual merchandising and its importance to the retail and fashion industries. Students develop skills in evaluation and implementation of visual merchandising concepts. The key elements covered include merchandising, principles and elements of design, terminology, and evaluation.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FT FD KW 270 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This is a course in which students will familiarize themselves with the knitwear world and will be introduced to a general knowledge of knitwear styles through examples of fashion designers and the use of technical instruments and methods of knitting. Emphasis is placed on learning standard draping and pattern making practices in the knitwear industry and on industrial methods to develop knit designs, together with learning the design aspects of different yarn types, the color, the fabric structure and analyzing the fashion trends in knitwear.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FC SF 360 | Section: Sum A | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FC SF 365 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: Resume Required
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smallerscale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.

Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FM FB 330 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyze the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FM RO 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FM RO 355 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Merchandising | Course #: FT FM VM 325 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course examines the creative field of visual merchandising and its importance to the retail and fashion industries. Students develop skills in the evaluation and implementation of visual merchandising concepts. The key elements covered include merchandising, principles and elements of design, terminology, and evaluation.
Contact Hours: 90

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FA AE GE 345 | Section: Sum A | Open
Introduces all aspects of the working of an art gallery. Students will be involved in curating and marketing art shows and auctions through a community and on campus promotions.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FA AE GE 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
Introduces all aspects of the working of an art gallery. Students will be involved in curating and marketing art shows and auctions through a community and on campus promotions.This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.


Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FA PD PA 225 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
In this foundational open-air painting course, students will explore and familiarize with the pleasures and challenges of painting outdoors. The students will acquire skills in the techniques of Plein Air oil painting and develop critical skills to evaluate paintings executed in this style. This course will also provide students with an in depth look at the various materials and products used for outdoor painting using wet techniques. Students will be introduced to the history and tradition of this genre; the conceptual in landscape painting will be emphasized with a specific focus on the Italian impressionists also known as the Macchiaioli. Sessions will be held in studio and at different outdoor venues in and around Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FA PD WC 180 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This foundation course will explore methods, techniques and various aspects of watercolor painting. The unique qualities of watercolor will be explored through direct observation exercises, demonstrations and individual projects. Watercolor techniques will be explored, including developing drawings to form strong compositions, capturing the effects of light, color-mixing and washes. Students will develop their painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities to artistic expression in watercolor medium. The class format consists of studio work with lectures, examples, demonstrations, and individual as well as group critiques. Reading and homework assignments are coordinated with the studio work.
Contact Hours: 45

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP BI 325 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Building on previous knowledge, students learn to mix, shape, bake, store, and distribute breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on increased use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment, and methods that emphasize flavor, texture, and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf life. this course offers the opportunity to learn the principles and techniques of preparing multi-grain breads, sourdoughs, holiday or seasonal breads, and flat breads. Special emphasis will be placed on Italian regional breads; handling grains (such as soakers) for specialty breads; mixing, shaping, and finishing specialty breads; and learning innovative baking methods.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP BP 450 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this placement, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an unsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP BP 550 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP BP 550 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP BT 320 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Baking techniques introduces the functions of baking ingredients (such as yeast, flour, and shortening), mixing methods for dough's, fermentation techniques, heat transfer methods. Focus on basic elements such as pastry dough, sponge cake, pachoux, puff pastry, plunder, danesi, croissant, egg/butter based basic creams, production and conservation of fruit conserves and meringues. In this course, students taste and test the products they create as well as complete a research assignment.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP DS 480 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
The aim of the course is to give students the fundamentals of
dessert presentation. Starting from fruit cutting skills, students will experience a variety of decoration techniques to be applied to mignons, single portion desserts, and tortes. Glazes and gelaces, buttercream, whipped cream, icings, and chocolate and caramel decorations will be explained and practiced to gain confidence with related techniques. Students will experience both classic and contemporary decoration methods ranging from piping skills to the application of specific equipment for royal-icing writing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute decorating and styling techniques and to develop their own personal plating style.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP IC 440 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
This course introduces students to classically applied mediums used in
display work and decoration. Students will learn to execute specific
designs in pastillage, rolled fondant, gum paste, and royal icing, as well
as with poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Production, storing of all types
of candied fruits and Italian mostarda. Production and storing of jams
and conserves, fruit jellies, Italian croccante, sugar fondant, almond
paste.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FW BP PT 475 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent
This course introduces non-yeast, laminated dough's and the
preparation of pastry products using a variety of methods-lamination, blending, creaming, foaming, and thickening. Students will combine these methods in new products, to create savory items and frozen desserts, and to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. The fundamentals of heat transfer as applied to pastries in the preparation of creams, custards, souffles, butter creams, meringues, and flavored whipped creams will also be studied. Students will taste and test the products created and will complete a research assignment.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA CC 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA CC 355 | Section: Sum A | Open
Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA CC 480 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Professional cooking II, Italian creative cuisine and decoration or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts and Baking Pastry Majors
This course is intended for advanced students with a sound knowledge of Italian traditional ingredients and regional cooking. The course will further develop advanced students skills in recipe elaboration, plate presentation and decoration. The course will show students how to build and develop innovative combination's of ingredients on the legacy of Italian tradition. Each class, introduced by a short lecture, will focus on planning creative menus and on creating decorative dishes, from starters to fresh pasta, from vegetable soups to cakes, including shellfish and typical cheeses. Restaurant simulations are scheduled as integral part of the course.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA HW 345 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorismWe are what we eat and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA HW 345 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorismWe are what we eat and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA NC 505 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Only for Culinary Arts Majors
Principles of planning, preparation and presentation of wholesome,
nutritionally balanced meals. the course emphasizes designing meals
on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA PC 335 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open only to Culinary Arts majors
This course will introduce students to the tools, techniques and essential food preparation of this industry. Special attention will be given to sanitation and hygiene. Students will also learn how to pair ingredients in the creation of various dishes. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order
to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA TF 340 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Only for Culinary Arts Majors.
This course focuses on the preparation of dishes that distinguish traditional Italian cuisine. Students will learn how to use different ingredients to prepare representative Italian dishes. The fundamentals of cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilized in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered; these concepts will prepare students continuing on to the intermediate and advanced sections of this course (II + III). Notions of the history of these dishes will also be discussed as students prepare the various recipes.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA TF 440 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food I or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts Majors.
This course continues to explore the tradition of Italian food through representative recipes. Emphasis will be given to more elaborate dishes, including the cleaning and preparation of shellfish, fresh pasta, food combination's, feast foods and banquets.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW CA TF 503 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food II or equivalent. Only for Culinary Arts majors
A survey of the major contemporary Italian chefs and their cooking
philosophy. Students will learn how to read and compose a menu, and
the major elements that distinguish high-level Italian cooking through
the original recipes of Gianfranco Vissani, Gualtiero Marchesi, Nadia
Santini and many others. this course is meant to help students
understand the current Italian culinary trends as a continuous evolution
of the different regional cooking traditions, while keeping in mind the
importance of a healthy diet combined with the individual chef's
creativity.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW SP CA 470 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FW SP CA 470 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FW DN LN 160 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FW DN TF 480 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our senses as they interact with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order define the tools to exmaine flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding for appreciation. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learningby doingthrough real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises,learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
6.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FW DN TF 507 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course explores and examines the physiology of sensory organs and how we perceive flavors. From the simplicity of identifying the basic tastes to the complexity of aftertastes and aromas, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand the mechanics of our
senses as they interact with food. Why do we react positively to sweet taste? Why do we sometimes refuse bitter taste? Does umami really exist? The course will answer these and many other related questions in order define the tools to examine flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding for appreciation. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC CC 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC CC 360 | Section: Sum A | Open
Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC FC 340 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italy-culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC FF 347 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC FF 347 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC HW 345 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorism �We are what we eat� and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC HW 345 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorism �We are what we eat� and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FW FC SF 300 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, trace-ability (labels),and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed,as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food, Family & Consumer Sciences | Course #: FW FS FB 310 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Family enterprises have always been central to the social and economic fabric of Italy. Some of the world's oldest family companies are Italian and the city of Florence represents a very important starting point for some of these. The course will explore the evolution, characteristics and significance of Italian family firms and it will also analyze the changes and trends in Italian family business over the centuries and how this system with 2,000 years of history behind is reacting to an age of increasing European unity and integration, mass immigration to Italy, globalization and competition with China and India. The first part of the course will give an overview of the history of family-owned firms from the Roman empire to the present day and their role in the social, political and economic life of Italy. The second part will consider case studies in different sectors: wine and food, fashion, the automobile industry and the hospitality sector.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FW WC PF 335 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The capacity to offer the best wine as a combination for chosen dishes is a very important task. the course includes an analysis of the "combination technique" used today by the Italian association of Sommeliers, sensory and quality evaluations, practical workshops on the most successful matches as well as the creation of new flavor combination.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FW WC TW 262 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of Tuscan wine typologies focusing particularly on a presentation of the most important wine growing areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be offered and a selection of Tuscan wines will be studied in terms of their characteristics.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Wine & Culture | Course #: FW WC WC 345 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards those students that are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation of the world as grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will disclose and analyse the various influences and cultural overlap that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate thee elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course features also a Field Learning component in order to allow students to discover and visit the most relevant locations in Italy in relationship to food and wine production and appreciation.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FW WC WC 340 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards those students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation of the world as grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will disclose and analyze the various influences and cultural overlap that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate thee elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a Field Learning component in order to allow students to discover and visit the most relevant locations in Italy with respect to food and wine production and appreciation.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FW WC WC 340 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards those students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation of the world as grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will disclose and analyze the various influences and cultural overlap that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate thee elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a Field Learning component in order to allow students to discover and visit the most relevant locations in Italy with respect to food and wine production and appreciation.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FW WE WS 335 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide
essential information about the following: stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting the proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine and an introduction to beverages other than wine.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FW WE WS 337 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will examine the figure of "the sommelier" and provide essential information about the following: stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting the proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine and an introduction to beverages other than wine. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150

Global Studies

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GS AN CI 202 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GS AN CI 202 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GS AN WA 300 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GS HS HN 150 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GS HS LN 160 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GS HS WA 300 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sustainable Development | Course #: GS SD SF 300 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, trace-ability (labels),and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed,as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality,food policies,and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings,and cooking labs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GS US SP 220 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Street photographers strive to capture the life and culture of city streets, searching for what Henri Cartier-Bresson, probably the most famous street photographer of all, termed the Decisive Moment When it comes to street photography, many photographers traditionally choose to work in black and white, focusing the viewers attention on the subject by eliminating the distraction of color. Wide-angle lenses are used by photographers who like to get in close to the action, a method that encourages interaction between the photographer and subject. Another technique is to use a lens with a long focal length to take photos from a distance and throw the background out of focus. Techniques mastered by Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand and Costas will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45

Horticulture

3.0 Credits
General Horticulture | Course #: HC VO TW 262 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of the Tuscan wine tradition. Wine typologies representative of the region will be considered throughout the course, which focuses particularly on a detailed study of the most important wine production areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be featured along with the analysis of select Tuscan wines and their specific characteristics.
Contact Hours: 45

Hospitality

3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HP HT CM 360 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and la Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been created and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropoli and developing destinations will be examined.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HP HT IE 200 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The course will provide students with a solid grounding of coordination of events and entertainment. The class will focus on the historical evolution, organizational standards and career paths in the field of event management. The lessons will also address theory elements concerning the foundations of strategic planning, financial management, human resources management and event sponsorship. Students will be involved in hands-on projects developed by the schools event manager in order to experience directly many tasks related to the planning and carrying out of events.
This class features a project at Ganzo for Wednesday AperiGanzo. Students will be involved in Wednesday evening shifts as a part of class.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HP HT RO 350 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HP HT RO 355 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PS EL SM 331 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course is a study of bakery operations and management
as practiced in a pastry shop environment. Studies focus on the various pastry shop components and front/back of the house areas. Front of the house emphasizes customer service, space management and maintenance, retail display, client relations, and ordering strategies. An introductory approach to the back of the house is considered in terms of equipment handling, supplies, production types, yields, formula conversions, dessert menu planning, and the handling of special requests and events. Safety and sanitation are examined
for proper practice and application in the pastry shop. Students will gain
familiarity with dessert categories and how they are positioned within the
baking industry.
This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community
Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning
environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction
with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the
local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers
as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential
learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step
by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to
student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model
allows students to benefi t from an all-encompassing educational experience
based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive
operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HP HL HM 430 | Open
This course examines two critical areas of hospitality management, management operations and front office procedures. In the first section students will regard the industry from a managerial perspective by covering the business procedures, accounting controls, legal issues, policies and controls employed in order to effectively operate hospitality structures such as hotels, resorts, restaurants, and clubs. The second half of the course focuses on front office procedures - business
flow, reservations processes, revenue management, accounting,
internal control, night audit, and computer systems for guest
management. Housekeeping operations, guest accounts, room
management, and other services will also be studied in a service oriented context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HP FB SF 300 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Development of a sustainable food system is an essential part of long term economic planning. the course focuses on food processing, packaging and distribution, exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed as well as case studies in food and beverage service and retailing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HP FB SM 330 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: This course features an Experiential Learning project with shifts at Fedora and Ganzo
The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HP FB SM 331 | Section: Sum A | Open
The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HP FB WS 335 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide essential information regarding wine service and beverage management. Topics include stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine, and an introduction to other beverages. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior and Visual Design

3.0 Credits
Architectural Restoration & History of Architecture | Course #: ID RH AA 355 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between slide lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Attention will be given to architects such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo and Leonardo, in addition to the visits to key Renaissance buildings.
Contact Hours: 45

Internships

3.0 Credits
Internship | Course #: PS IN IN 450 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120

Italian Studies and Linguistics

6.0 Credits
Italian for Six Credits | Course #: IS IT IB 165 | Section: Sum A | Open
The intensive six-credit Italian course gives students the opportunity to experience total immersion in the language. Students will develop the four cornerstones of foreign language study, comprehension, readings, writing, and, above all, speaking. All lessons will be taught in Italian. Students will begin the course with a comprehensive Florentine cultural and practical orientation, including site visits and walking tours. Students will have a one time cooking and language lab and dinner together. The beginning levels concentrate on the development of the spoken language and on the ability to understand. the intermediate levels help students to master more complex grammatical structures and to enrich their vocabulary with the use of contemporary material such as newspapers and videos. In addition, students will compose short written essays.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Italian for Six Credits | Course #: IS IT II 215 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
The intensive six-credit Italian course gives students the opportunity to experience total immersion in the language. Students will develop the four cornerstones of foreign language study, comprehension, readings, writing, and, above all, speaking. All lessons will be taught in Italian. Students will begin the course with a comprehensive Florentine cultural and practical orientation, including site visits and walking tours. This class
meets Monday to Thursday for three hours per session during the semester and Monday through Friday in the summer sessions; in addition there is a Monday lecture and Tuesday film series as well as mandated hours in the language lab. Students will have a one-time cooking and language lab and dinner together. The course concludes with a week of in-depth review and final exam in week 12 of the semester or day 12 of the summer sessions. The beginning levels concentrate on the development of the spoken language and on the ability to understand. The intermediate levels help students to master more complex grammatical structures and to enrich their vocabulary with the use of contemporary material such as
newspapers and videos. In addition, students will compose short written essays. At the advanced levels students will develop what they have learned in the previous levels and will further progress in their ability to produce written texts and to be able to discuss specific topics without pre-preparation.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT IB 101 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense, Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT IB 101 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense, Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT II 201 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT II 201 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT II 201 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT II 204 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: One semester of Italian language or equivalent, the last course must have been taken in the last academic year. Students must take the Italian anguage placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional and develop their language ability by
using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures. This course includes 15 hours of service within the Florentine community. This will involve associations and institutions based in Florence, but known throughout Italy, such as Ail (Association against leukemia), libera terra (Association of producers and institutions working on former Mafia properties land and buildings), to name but a few.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: IS IT II 250 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level or above are required to take a placement test.
This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of subjunctive and all four tenses.

*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.

Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: PS EL IB 104 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: This course includes 15 hours of Service within the Florentine Community.
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, will recognize gender and number both in nouns and adjectives, and will approach passato prossimo. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before. This course includes 15 hours of Service within the Florentine Community. This will involve associations and institutions based in Florence, but known throughout Italy, such as AIL (Association against Leukemia), Libera Terra (Association of producers and institutions working on former Mafia belongings land and buildings), to name but a few.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Italian Language for Three Credits | Course #: PS EL II 204 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: One semester of Italian language or equivalent, the last course must have been taken in the last academic year. Students must take the Italian language placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional and develop their language ability by
using direct and indirect object pronouns. this course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
This course includes 15 hours of service within the Florentine community.
this will involve associations and institutions based in Florence, but
known throughout Italy, such as Ail (Association Against Leukemia),
libera terra (Association of producers and institutions working on former
mafia properties land and buildings), to name but a few.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Italian Studies | Course #: IS IS CI 202 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Studies | Course #: IS IS CI 202 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.


Contact Hours: 45

Liberal Arts

3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LA AH AA 355 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between slide lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Attention will be given to architects such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo and Leonardo, in addition to the visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LA AH CI 202 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LA AH CI 202 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LA AH IR 220 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This introductory course is aimed at students who have little or no background in the history of Western art. Before examining the beginnings of Renaissance art which took hold in which took hold in Florence in the early years of the fifteenth century, students will be given a broad overview of Greek and Roman art and architecture the emulation of which is fundamental to understanding the cultural revolution of the Renaissance. through on-site visits to medieval churches and palaces in Florence, students will early on become familiar with the Romanesque and Gothic styles in which the first Renaissance painters, sculptors and architects had their roots and from which they were dramatically to diverge. Since site-visits are a significant part of this course, the focus will be on Florentine artists who will include: Masaccio, Donatello, Brunelleschi , Fraangelico, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. By way of comparison consideration will also be given to other art centers in Italy such as Venice, Siena and Ferrara. as well as analyzing the style and subject matter of works of art, students will learn about the techniques of painting and sculpture and comparisons will be made with techniques in other countries in the same period, for example the use of oil paints in Flemish painting.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: LA CM HM 380 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics and society from the nineteenth century until the present day. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia in the past 30 years, to the nature of Mafia activities and their spread beyond Sicily to the Italian mainland and the relationship of 'Cosa Nostra' to the United States. Lectures and discussions will be heavily supplemented with newspaper/magazine articles, films (documentary and fictional) and contemporary literature.
Please note that films and documentaries will be viewed outside of
regularly scheduled class time.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LA HS HM 380 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics and society from the nineteenth century until the present day. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia in the past 30 years, to the nature of Mafia activities and their spread beyond Sicily to the Italian mainland and the relationship of 'Cosa Nostra' to the United States. Lectures and discussions will be heavily supplemented with newspaper/magazine articles, films (documentary and fictional) and contemporary literature.
Please note that films and documentaries will be viewed outside of
regularly scheduled class time.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: LA PL WA 300 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: LA PY SP 304 | Section: Sum A | Open
"We see the world as we do, not because that is the way it is, but because we have these ways of seeing" (Wittgenstein). Social psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories regarding attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behavior. As this course is taught in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Religious Studies | Course #: LA RS WR 300 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This is an introductory comparative study of the world's major religions including: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and the religions of China and Japan. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes in all religions studied such as: the nature of this world and universe, the relationship between the individual and the transcendent, ultimate reality, the meaning and goals of worldly life, the importance of worship and rituals, the importance of devotion to the master or guru, ethics and human action. Excerpts from important texts of each tradition will be analyzed.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *


Contact Hours: 45

Life Studies / Human Services

6.0 Credits
Community Development | Course #: PS EL SM 325 | Section: Sum A | Open
What do we mean by "community"? How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. Although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires the active engagement of students and a willingness to experience a full immersion in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. Students who participate in this course will actively and productively engage in established and emerging forms of social media - and have some notion of how these practices affect the self and the community. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Health Humanities | Course #: LS HH LN 160 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO CI 202 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
The lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academically rich understanding of the History art, architecture, and culture of Italy. The course provides additional enrichment through contextual use of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final reflective paper.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO CI 202 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
The lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academically rich understanding of the History art, architecture, and culture of Italy. The course provides additional enrichment through contextual use of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final reflective paper.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO FC 340 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. the main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italys culture and style in post-war Italy. also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO FC 340 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. the main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italys culture and style in post-war Italy. also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO WC 340 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyze the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LS SO WC 345 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards those students that are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation of the world as grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will disclose and analyse the various influences and cultural overlap that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate thee elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course features also a Field Learning component in order to allow students to discover and visit the most relevant locations in Italy in relationship to food and wine production and appreciation.

Contact Hours: 90

Professional Studies

3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PS SP BP 550 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PS SP BP 550 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PS SP CA 470 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Some practicum take place at Ganzo, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PS SP CA 470 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Some practicum take place at Ganzo, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.
Contact Hours: 150

Professional Studies and Experiential Learning

4.0 Credits
Community Service | Course #: PS CS IB 104 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, will recognize gender and number both in nouns and adjectives, and will approach passato prossimo. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before. This course includes 15 hours of Service within the Florentine Community. This will involve associations and institutions based in Florence, but known throughout Italy, such as AIL (Association against Leukemia), Libera Terra (Association of producers and institutions working on former Mafia belongings land and buildings), to name but a few.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Community Service | Course #: PS CS II 204 | Section: Sum A | Open
Pre-requisite: One semester of Italian language or equivalent, the last course must have been taken in the last academic year. Students must take the Italian language placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional and develop their language ability by
using direct and indirect object pronouns. this course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
This course includes 15 hours of service within the Florentine community.
This will involve associations and institutions based in Florence, but
known throughout Italy, such as Ail (Association against leukemia),
libera terra (Association of producers and institutions working on former
mafia properties land and buildings), to name but a few.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Community Service | Course #: PS CS SP 304 | Section: Sum A | Open
4 semester credits. "We see the world as we do, not because that is the way it is, but because we have these ways of seeing" (Wittgenstein). Social psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories regarding attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behavior. As this course is taught in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment. This course includes service learning hours within the Florentine Community.
Contact Hours: 45

Sport and Health Sciences

6.0 Credits
Sport Management | Course #: SH SS EF 285 | Section: Sum A | Open
This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the world of facility operations and event management in the sport industry. The classes will focus on various aspects of both business, legal and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged with the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. The experiential learning component will enhance the students perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Sport Management | Course #: SH SS HN 150 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centers within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customized exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sport Management | Course #: SH SS LN 160 | Section: Sum 2 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sport Management | Course #: SH SS WA 300 | Section: Sum 1 | Open
This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational - as well as physical - experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of "wanderlust" will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.
Contact Hours: 45

Internships
Semester students can apply for a part time 3-credit internship to be completed as part of the elective program. Students are placed in internships that complement their major or minor, and are supported by an internship supervisor. While Italian language proficiency is not required, it is helpful for expanding the placement options. At the completion of the internship students produce an analytical report that synthesizes what they have learned. For more information on internships see FUA Internships.

Program Add-On: Cultural Introduction to Italy course (1 week / 3 credits)
The 1 week Cultural Introduction to Italy course can be added to any FUA summer program. The traveling course is comprised of field study and travel research on location in destinations unique for their local cultures, economies, histories, and societies. Students participating in this course arrive in Rome the week prior to their regular program start and spend one week participating in lectures, visiting historic and contemporary sites, tasting local gastronomy, and experiencing the culture of Tuscany. At the end of the week, students travel to Florence to complete their regular summer program. Students who wish to continue this course topic in Florence can combine the add-on program with the Florence-based course during the regular summer program for a total of 6 credits. Please note: students enrolled in this add-on program arrive in Rome on May 6, 2018

Schedule & Registration
Students can enroll in either 6 week classes or back-to-back 3 week classes. SAI students complete their course registration directly with FUA through the FUA student portal. Upon confirming enrollment in the SAI program at FUA, students receive information for creating their FUA student portal and selecting their classes. FUA courses are competitive, and students should complete their course requests as early as possible as the registration period begins months ahead of the application deadline.

Course Changes
Students wishing to make changes to their class schedule prior to departure can do so directly by logging into their FUA student account. Students receive an email confirmation from SAI once the change is accepted. Students are permitted to make as many adjustments to their schedule prior to departure as needed. The last day to submit a schedule change prior to departure is approximately 6 weeks prior to departure. After the deadline, no changes can be made until the Add/Drop period in Florence. There is a very strict Add/Drop policy that all students must adhere to; neither FUA nor SAI can make exceptions.


Pre-Departure Calendar
February 27 2018
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
February 12 2018
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
March 14 2018
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
March 14 2018
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
March 15 2018
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
April 13 2018
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
May 13 2018*
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 6:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
May 14 2018
SAI & FUA Orientation
Mandatory orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, academics, policies, housing, and culture.
May 15 2018
FUA Classes Begin
May 15 2018
FUA Add/Drop Deadline
Course changes are not allowed after this date.
June 21 2018
FUA Classes End
June 22 2018
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.

* Students adding the Cultural Introduction to Italy course arrive in Rome (FCO airport) on May 6, 2018 by 5:00 pm

SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$5,900
Program Fee: 9 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$7,100
Optional / Additional Fees:
Optional Add-on: Cultural Introduction to Italy Course (3 credits)
1 week course prior to regular program, includes housing and travel expenses.
$2,100
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$330
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Shared
Homestay housing in shared occupancy room. Includes daily breakfast and weekday dinner.
$646
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Private
Homestay housing in private occupancy room. Includes daily breakfast and weekday dinner.
$1,024
Add-on Course Credits
Fee for enrollment over 6 or 9 credits.
$450 / credit
Add-on Non-Credit Course
Fee for enrolling in one non-credit course.
$350
Add-on Non-Credit Field Learning Course
Fees vary, paid directly to FUA.
contact SAI
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Florence
$950 $1,300
Books
$50 / course $100 / course
Course Fees & Supplies
$50 / course $300 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$650 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $400 / month
Transportation within Florence
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $175 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • Frequent SAI cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Dinner
SAI welcomes students to Florence with a buffet of traditional Italian delights to mingle and get to know participants.

Hike to Piazzale Michelangelo
Located just outside the old city walls, Piazzale Michelangelo offers a bird’s eye view of the city of Florence. Students hike to the top, stopping along the way for gelato. As the sun sets over the city, the group can experience the centuries-old Vespers ceremonial chanting by Cistercian monks in the crypt of the Basilica of San Miniato al Monte.

Wine Tasting
Students spend an afternoon learning bout and tasting great wines, perfectly paired with Tuscan specialties.

Italian Cooking Lessons
SAI offers Italian cooking lessons throughout the semester taught by a local expert Chef. Each lesson teaches students how to make typical Tuscan dishes and includes an appetizer, first course, and dessert. At the end of the lesson students feast on their own homemade Italian meal!

Summer Musical Event
Students attend one of the relaxing outdoor summer operas, concerts, or performances that take place in Florence’s many museum courtyards and public gardens.

Versilia Coast Beach Day
The Riviera of Versilia is known not only for its beautiful sandy beaches but also for its stunning coastline of the Apuan Alps. Students spend the day in this vacation destination of great artists since the beginning of 1900, which is now known for its fashionable resorts, shopping and nightlife.

Farewell Evening
Students celebrate the end of a successful term abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Italian meal.

The following housing options apply to the regular summer program. Please note that add-on pre-session courses have different housing arrangements during the pre-session time only.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient, clean, and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (upgrade to private bedroom available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless internet. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
SAI homestay families are thoroughly screened and are accustomed to welcoming visiting students into their homes. Homestays provide a shared (with another study abroad student) or private bedroom in the family home with basic furnishings. Daily breakfast and weekday dinner are included (no dinner on weekends). Please note that some homestays may be outside of the city center and require a commute to reach school.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas

In accordance with Italian law U.S. students studying in Italy for 90 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Therefore all U.S. students do not require a student visa for this program. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.