Florence University of the Arts
Summer 3 weeks III 2020
3 - 6 credits

Students in FUA’s 3 week summer programs select 1 or 2 courses for an intensive 3 week program. SAI offers four Summer 3 week sessions at FUA, each with different start dates and course options: Summer I, Summer II, Summer III, and Summer IV. Students in the 3 week summer program can choose to add one of the 1 week program add-on courses, extending their program to 4 weeks.


Application: now open
Closes: April 14, 2020
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
USF student conduct form
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Broad range of courses including Italian language, history, fashion, fine arts, and literature.
  • Add a pre-session course on Italian culture or Italian families.

Program Dates
June 28, 2020 – July 17, 2020
dates may differ as a result of add-ons


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

* Contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 500+ (paper-based), IELTS: 5+, OOPT: 50+, or equivalent.



Business and Economics
Digital Imaging and Visual Arts
Fashion, Accessories and Tech
Fine Arts
Food and Wine Studies
Global Studies
Hospitality
Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability
Italian Studies and Linguistics
Journalism, Communication, and Publishing
Liberal Arts
Life Studies / Human Services
Professional Studies and Experiential Learning
Sciences and Mathematics
Sport and Health Sciences

Business and Economics

3.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship Resources | Course #: BUEREM305 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of
new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUMAHR350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is open to students of Junior Standing.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKEM305 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BUMKIM280 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is designed for non-business majors and introduces students to the role of marketing within a business. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, readings and simulations, students will address analytical marketing concepts and techniques developed from economics, psychology, statistics, and finance in order to plan and develop products and services to satisfy the needs of target customers. Topics include product planning, pricing, promotion, advertising, distribution policies, targeting, and market research techniques.
Contact Hours: 45

Digital Imaging and Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHID180 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.
This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: DIPHPJ320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended
This course introduces students to the world of photography with specific focus on the photo-journalistic aspects of this art medium. The course will be divided between field study and learning introductory digital techniques, working with both black and white and color digital printing and finishing. the lab practice will give students the capability of elaborating and correctly printing his/her own pictures. the course concentrates on the journalistic area of photography using digital equipment. Students learn about the history, com positional issues and techniques of photojournalism by studying the work of influential photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Smith, Capa, Salgado, Nachtwey, and others. The class will also be conceiving, shooting, printing and laying out a series of documentary projects. This course is recommended for communications, journalism and social science
students. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGD350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Visual Communication | Course #: DIVCGI210 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator highly recommended
The course explores illustration as an instrument of communication (i.e. in advertising) and narration (i.e. in comic books). It aims to improve drawing and design skills by teaching image making, with an emphasis on edge, shape, color and value. The student will learn to apply composition and design, and color and conceptualization, to a wide range of materials and techniques. Students use Adobe Photoshop to enhance traditional work and acquire important knowledge in the digital domain. Idea development within real-world parameters, originality, aesthetics and technical proficiency are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45

Fashion, Accessories and Tech

3.0 Credits
Accessory Design & Technology | Course #: FTADAD250 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is an introduction to accessory design. Students will be exposed to a variety of design materials. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional sketching and on creative detail design of: footwear, handbags (including embellished evening bags), small leather goods, gloves, and belts. The course includes a historical overview of personal accessories from ancient Egypt to the present. Field trips will include: trade fairs, a leather factory and the Ferragamo Museum.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCFM300 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course examines fashion as a form of communication and culture using a diverse range of readings. Topics include: what fashion means and how it has been valued through history, popular culture and media institutions. Students explore economic and social issues that revolve around fashion's industrial production and analyze fashion both in terms of its production and consumption, addressing its role in relation to identity and body politics (gender, race, sexuality, class), art and status, nationhood and the global economy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Communication & Publishing | Course #: FTFCSC280 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and steeling the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the new in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship. Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design & Technology | Course #: FTFDFD230 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is an introduction to creative design development and
fashion design skills. topics include: design processes of trend research, storyboard compiling, color story, fabric selection, draping design concepts, design innovation and the 2-D to 3-D development of creative ideas. There will be assigned projects in all of these areas. Students will also be introduced to the basics of fashion illustration. Students prepare for their fourth-semester design collections by exploring the roles of research, design development, and editing in the fashion design process. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge of key fashion categories, markets, and price points.



Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFCSF360 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The success of a small fashion retail store implies many skills. The professional in this field has to pay close attention to the types of products offered for sale, how to best present those products to consumers, and determining what is a reasonable retail price for each unit sold. While retailers have traditionally engaged in the task of retail merchandising in a physical location, the Internet has now made it possible to apply these same basic principles in a virtual setting. In order to be successful in retail management, it is necessary to provide consumers with specific key benefits. Firstly, the products must be of high quality; this helps to turn consumers into returning customers. Along with quality, the retailer must also sell products at prices considered reasonable by the consumer. By providing quality products at affordable prices, the retailer has an improved chance of standing out from the competition and of lengthening the lifetime of the business. In this course, students understand the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and become aware of the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through the practice gained by running a real enterprise at a laboratory in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Course includes site visits to famous luxury brands as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and two special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMFR350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMRO350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Merchandising | Course #: FTFMVM325 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course examines the creative field of visual merchandising and its importance to the retail and fashion industries. Students develop skills in the evaluation and implementation of visual merchandising concepts. The key elements covered include merchandising, principles and elements of design, terminology, and evaluation.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Art Education | Course #: FAAEGE345 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Introduces all aspects of the working of an art gallery. Students will be involved in curating and marketing art shows and auctions through a community and on campus promotions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Ceramics | Course #: FACECE200 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. In the first part of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. In the second part of the course, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing. Slide lectures will give students essential information on the nature of clay and glazes. the history of Mediterranean ceramics will be covered during in-class lectures. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Painting & Drawing | Course #: FAPDFS225 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is designed to take full advantage of the student's unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channeled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significant and visual interest ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists for centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

Contact Hours: 45

Food and Wine Studies

3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBC310 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields.
Students will study the history and background of various national and regional cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical cakes, variations from classical methods, and customer-driven deviations from traditional preparations. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings, and glazes, with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skill execution for Italian cakes. Special attention will be paid to advanced creaming methods (separated creaming methods, creaming without leavening agents) and combination methods. Piping skills are practiced.


Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBP550 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPBT320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields
Baking techniques introduces the functions of baking ingredients (such as yeast, flour, and shortening), mixing methods for dough's, fermentation techniques, heat transfer methods. Focus on basic elements such as pastry dough, sponge cake, pachoux, puff pastry, plunder, danesi, croissant, egg/butter based basic creams, production and conservation of fruit conserves and meringues. In this course, students taste and test the products they create as well as complete a research assignment.

Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Baking and Pastry | Course #: FWBPRD495 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Baking and Pastry Majors only.
This course covers the preparation and service of hot and cold desserts with a focus on individual desserts and the components involved in preparation. Students will learn and improve station organization, timing, and service coordination for restaurant dessert production. Products made will include fried products, tarts, souffle, creams, frozen desserts. Both individual plated desserts, and desserts for banquets will be prepared. Students will develop a dessert menu from the perspective of variety, costs, practicality, and how well it matches the rest of the menu. This course includes 150 hours of Experiential Learning with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The Experiential Learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive
operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 195
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAHW345 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorismWe are what we eat and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAPC330 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above field
This course will introduce students to the tools, techniques and essential food preparation of this industry. Special attention will be given to sanitation and hygiene. Students will also learn how to pair ingredients in the creation of various dishes.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAVC504 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent. Unofficial transcript submission required.
The last 40 years of food service have been characterized by a slow yet constant development of nutritional awareness and a more informed approach to food. The aim of the course is not only to offer students techniques for a healthier approach to cooking: this course will focus on cooking techniques that can be applied in order to reduce fat consumption and at same time become the emblems of contemporary cuisine. Flavor-extraction methods, flavoring methods, pressure cooking and sous vide cooking, marinades and brines and the use of alternative fats are nowadays the base of contemporary Chefs' creations: students will learn how these techniques can be used to develop a fine dining cuisine that can be healthier yet not necessarily health-fanatic. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
 Prerequisites: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWCAWC480 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Culinary arts majors only.
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside of the Mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important cultural macro areas. Students will experience food preparation based on the customs and heritage of diverse cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course. The aim is to show how the environment and external cultural influences have a strong impact on local cuisines. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Culinary Arts | Course #: FWSPCA470 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Dietetics & Nutrition | Course #: FWDNLN160 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFC340 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italy-culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCFF347 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite:
The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family, to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, to growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and culture scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities, encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence's thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food & Culture | Course #: FWFCHW345 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterized by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analyzed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorism �We are what we eat� and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food, Family & Consumer Sciences | Course #: FWFSIF200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning with Italian families before session start. The course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Food, Family & Consumer Sciences | Course #: FWFSIF320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The course examines the development, structure, and maintenance of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The class will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. This course includes Service Learning hours. Students will be involved in experiential learning projects which will provide students the opportunity to interact through the "Family Club" with Italian families and merge with the local community.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Food, Family & Consumer Sciences | Course #: FWFSIF330 | Open
One week of on-site field learning with Italian families before session start. Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWA340 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course provides the fundamental skills and a technical introduction to wine tasting beginning with the visual, olfactory, and gustatory examination. Students will learn to analyze the organoleptic components of wines, the importance and influences attributed by to territory, and finally how to distinguish as well as create excellent food and wine pairings. Lectures will be supplemented by wine tasting workshops. The objective of this class is for students to be able to recognize quality in wines from around the world and obtain a working knowledge of international wine regions and as well as the wine industry.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWS335 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide
essential information about the following: stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting the proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine and an introduction to beverages other than wine.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Wine Expertise | Course #: FWWEWS350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management special project will be acquire and practice skills related to managing the wine and beverage service at GANZO, the school restaurant and creative learning lab of Apicius International School of Hospitality. Under the leadership and supervision of wine service professionals, students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a restaurant and/or wineries. The aim of the special project is to increase knowledge of wine service, presentation methods, restaurant procedures, wine expertise, and pairing in the hospitality industry. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150

Global Studies

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI202 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSLN160 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Happiness Sciences | Course #: GSHSPT180 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
In the 1900's, fitness pioneer Joseph Pilates designed and refined a series of exercises to rehabilitate himself from poor health and physical conditions from which he suffered in the early part of his life. Students will explore the health benefits and the physical practice of Pilates, a form of low-impact, whole-body exercise adaptable to all fitness levels. Students will learn about alignment, breathing, strengthening, balance, flexibility, and awareness as they progress through Pilates exercises and learn how to intelligently move their body. Students will also identify and evaluate the characteristics of exercises which are optimal for modern lifestyles, long-term health and wellness, individual needs, as well as rehabilitation and injury prevention. Basic anatomy and physiology as related to Pilates as well as healthy diet principals will also be covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Multicultural Diversity and Gender Studies | Course #: GSDGNN350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrante's four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italy's complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italy's Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Urban Studies | Course #: GSUSSC280 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and steeling the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the new in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship. Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students' academic and personal enrichment.
Contact Hours: 45

Hospitality

3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTHR350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for people whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional Human Resources. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTIN320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Hospitality or equivalent.
This course examines the development of international tourism from its historic beginnings to current growth. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of tourism marketing and structures, the role of governments in international tourism, the effect of tourism in a country's infrastructure and society, and the impact of tourism in developing countries.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO250 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of retailing management. Students will learn about the different types of retailers, characteristics of retail channels, customers, and competitors in order to develop effective retail strategies. This course focuses on strategic decisions made by retailers including retail market strategy, location and site strategy selection for retail outlets, and store layout design and strategies. Students will learn about merchandising management principles, including how to manage merchandise inventory, organize merchandise, and evaluate performance. This course includes principles of retail pricing and how retailers set and adjust prices for the merchandise and services they offer. Students will also gain knowledge on how retailers build their brand image and communicate with customers. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: HPHTRO350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management | Course #: PSELWC480 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course focuses on important foreign cuisines outside of the Mediterranean area and is meant to teach students how the influence of local cultures affected food preparation techniques and dishes in important cultural macro areas. Students will experience food preparation based on the customs and heritage of diverse cultures. The ingredients used in the preparation of the dishes, along with their origin and diffusion, will be the highlights of the course. The aim is to show how the environment and external cultural influences have a strong impact on local cuisines. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. In addition to regular lecture hours, students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Hotel and Lodging Management | Course #: HPHTSE350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The aim of this special project course is to expose students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies. The aforementioned strategies will be employed from the perspective of hospitality management and the application of program techniques in special event management. Topics will include booking, event programming and coordination, themes, program partnerships, and event promotion. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBRM350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course will focus on the basic understanding of restaurant management, including service management and customer relations, menu planning, and wine list development under the supervision of wine experts. Students will observe and analyze the main operational areas of the restaurant such as food safety and sanitation, guest services, operational responsibilities, and staff communication. Moreover, students will learn how to maintain daily records of customers, sales and costs, as well as produce monthly records. Students will assist the manager in setting service standards and creating a platform for all restaurant operations in accordance with restaurant needs. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. .
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBSM330 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course features an Experiential Learning project with shifts at Fedora and Ganzo
The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Restaurant, Food and Beverage Management | Course #: HPFBWS335 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide essential information regarding wine service and beverage management. Topics include stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine, and an introduction to other beverages. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior Design, Environmental Architecture, and Sustainability

3.0 Credits
Architectural Restoration & History of Architecture | Course #: IDRHAR340 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.
Contact Hours: 45

Italian Studies and Linguistics

3.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI200 | Open
Pre-requisite:
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI202 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITIB101 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense, Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ISITII201 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Students entering at the intermediate level are required to take a placement test.
This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. After taking this course, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present conditional, making future plans using the Future tense and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.
*FUA policy requires that when less than 4 students enroll in an Italian language class, the class will be taught at reduced contact hours. With less students the instructor is able to cover the same program in less time, while also providing more individualized attention.


Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ISILNN350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrante's four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italys complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italys Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45

Journalism, Communication, and Publishing

3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CPJLFM300 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion's connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CPJLPJ320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.
During this two-pronged course, students will focus on: 1) the history and study of photojournalism from its genesis/inception to today and 2) assignments/projects that are journalistic newsworthy (events, human interest, artistic/cultural, sports, feature, and portrait). Students will emulate what it is like to be a newspaper photographer and learn storytelling images of the everyday events that occur in life. Through lectures and discussions students will also address contemporary issues such as: the cultural, social, and political influence of images and photojournalism in society as well as ethics and legal issues in photojournalism. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images.This course is recommended for Communications, Journalism, and Social Sciences students.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mass Communications | Course #: CPMCCP150 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course introduces students to the strategic roles and functions of the Public Relations (PR) practitioner. Students evaluate the context in which PR is practiced, gain an understanding of the potential and practice of PR as a management function, and critically analyze the structure of PR management, its role, and techniques. In addition, students will be introduced to the rhetorical arguments that impact PR activities and will be made aware of the importance of professionalism and ethics in the practice of public relations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Publishing | Course #: CPJLTW290 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The basis of this course is the development of creative writing skills by focusing on the genre of travel writing. Students will read and discuss extracts from the great classics of travel writing as well as current travel journalism published in newspapers magazines and on-line. Assignments will focus on helping the student find an individual voice, on developing ideas and honing them through revision and drafting, on writing for different audiences, and on the inclusion of photographs in their written work. For those students who wish to combine their own photographic work with their travel writing, the course schedule does not conflict with Digital Photography and Travel Photography classes. Emphasis will also be placed on the students' ability to evaluate and critique their own work and that of others. At the end of the semester students will see their work published in an in-house publication.
Contact Hours: 45

Liberal Arts

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: GSANCI200 | Open
Pre-requisite: Mandatory pre-departure readings must be fulfilled prior to program start. Lectures and learning activities held in different locations. This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students.
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.

Pre-semester Field Learning program Sunday Aug 27, 2017 - Students arrive (Rome, by 5pm) Monday Aug 28 - Orientation Monday Aug 28 to Sunday Sept 3 Cultural Introduction to Italy Sunday Sept 3 - Classes end (Florence)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHAR340 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History and Architecture | Course #: LAAHCI202 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. Florence only.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: LACRNN350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrante's four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italys complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italys Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: LACRRM350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Bride kidnapping, also known as marriage by abduction or marriage by capture, is a practice throughout history and around the world in which a man abducts the woman he wishes to marry. The custom of fuitina was widespread in Sicily and southern Italy. In theory and in some cases it was an agreed elopement between two youngsters; in practice it was often a forcible kidnapping and rape, followed by a so-called "rehabilitating marriage" (matrimonio riparatore). In 1965 this custom was brought to national attention by the case of Franca Viola, a 17- year-old abducted and raped by a local small-time criminal, with the assistance of a dozen of his friends. When she was returned to her family after a week, she refused to marry her abductor, contrary to local expectation. Her family courageously backed her up, and suffered severe intimidation for their efforts; the kidnappers were arrested and the main perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The exposure of this archaic and intransigent system of values and behavioral mores caused great national debate. A 1970 film, "La moglie pia bella" (The Most Beautiful Wife) by Damiano Damiani and starring Ornella Muti, is based on the case. Article 544 of the Italian Penal Code will be changed only in 1981, when, by Law, rape could not be cancelled by marriage. This course examines the relationship between gender inequality and the legal system. Topics include abortion, marriage, divorce, custody, equal pay, sexual harassment, rape, pornography, and prostitution. Students are introduced to basic legal research tools, such as statutes, regulations, cases, and legal literature.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition and Creative Writing | Course #: LACWTW290 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The basis of this course is the development of creative writing skills by focusing on the genre of travel writing. Students will read and discuss extracts from the great classics of travel writing as well as current travel journalism published in newspapers, magazines, and online.
Assignments will focus on developing an individual voice, and honing ideas
through revision and drafting. Topics will cover how to write for different
audiences and publishing formats. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine and newsletter of the FUA campus press Ingorda.
This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
European Cultural Studies | Course #: ISISCI207 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before semester/summer sessions: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). Upon completion of the field learning week, the course continues as a regular academic session in Florence. The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSIR330 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course explores the meaning of the term 'Renaissance' when applied to the period of Italian history from circa 1350 to 1550. The subject will be approached from a variety of standpoints: social, political, economic, intellectual, scientific and artistic. The focus will be on the concept of Italian Renaissance Humanism and on the relationship between art and society during this period. Lectures will be supplemented by a number of visits to key historical sites in Florence. Field trips and museum visits are an intricate part of the course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: LAHSNN350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrantes four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italys complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italys Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Music and Performing Arts | Course #: LAPAPB120 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is designed to provide individual instruction in piano
technique, performance preparation, basic musical skills and music
appreciation, as well as to foster independent and self-motivated
learners. Topics include: basic technical skills, correct articulation of the fingers, scales and arpeggios and the basics of polyphonic technique.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: LAPYCS310 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: A background in Psychology or Social Psychology recommended.
Over the past 30 years, globalization has brought with it a phenomenon that has increasingly been recognized by both psychologists and anthropologists as a viable field of research: culture shock. Also referred to as 'culture fatigue' or 'role shock, culture shock refers to the reactions of travelers during their first few months in a foreign country. This course presents culture shock within the context of cross-cultural psychology and puts a specific emphasis on the students' own experiences as they
live and study in a foreign country. Topics explored will include the
following: the role of communication and communication norms,
cultural variables, taboos and rituals, and cultural adjustment.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: LAPYSP300 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Social Psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories about attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behavior. As this course is taught to Americans living in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment. In this sense the classroom will become the laboratory for this class.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Religious Studies | Course #: LARSRW320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course will examine the presentation and position of women in major world religious traditions such as Christianity and Islam. Other religions, including pagan and neo-pagan cults and religions, will be introduced for comparative purposes. Much use will be made of religious texts, feminist criticism and the study of the visual arts. Lectures will be augmented by on-site teaching in Florence in order to examine the depiction of female saints in Italian art in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods.
Contact Hours: 45

Life Studies / Human Services

3.0 Credits
Health Humanities | Course #: LSHHLN160 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Health Humanities | Course #: LSHHSP300 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
"We see the world as we do, not because that is the way it is, but because we have these ways of seeing" (Wittgenstein). Social psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories regarding attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behavior. As this course is taught in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one�s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOCI202 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academically rich understanding of the History art, architecture, and culture of Italy. The course provides additional enrichment through contextual use of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final reflective paper.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOFC340 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. the main focus consists of what is generally defined as made in Italys culture and style in post-war Italy. also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOIF200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning with Italian families before session start. The course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSOIF320 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
The course examines the development, structure, and maintenance of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The class will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. This course includes Service Learning hours. Students will be involved in experiential learning projects which will provide students the opportunity to interact through the "Family Club" with Italian families and merge with the local community.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: LSSONN350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course is centered around Ferrantes four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Len, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italys complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence. Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italys Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the Economic Miracle, terrorism during the anni di piombo, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.
Contact Hours: 45

Professional Studies and Experiential Learning

3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPFR350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project allows the student to interact with the local fashion economy through FLY Fashion Loves You, the retail store operated by the students and faculty members of FAST. The fashion retail management special project involves store organization, business procedures and client relations. Students will have the chance to be immersed in the fashion retail industry through duties that include but are not limited to sales, stocking, floor management, customer service, promotion, and research. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPGD350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Portfolio of previous work, layout and illustration software experience.
This special project course focuses on the area of graphic design in visual communication. Students will interact with figures such as graphic designers as well as art directors for creative projects. Topics may include logo design, corporate identity and branding, advertising, design in journalism, product packaging, book design, web design, etc. The use of design software is required. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPGR350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
This special project allows students to interact with the local community in Florence through experiential learning in collaboration with the Community Engagement Member Institutions affiliated with Florence University of the Arts. These community projects are directly linked to the academic divisions of FUA and open to the general public in order to share academic results with the greater community. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPRM350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
This special project course will focus on the basic understanding of restaurant management, including service management and customer relations, menu planning, and wine list development under the supervision of wine experts. Students will observe and analyze the main operational areas of the restaurant such as food safety and sanitation, guest services, operational responsibilities, and staff communication. Moreover, students will learn how to maintain daily records of customers, sales and costs, as well as produce monthly records. Students will assist the manager in setting service standards and creating a platform for all restaurant operations in accordance with restaurant needs. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. .
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPSE350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
The aim of this special project course is to expose students to the principles of event planning with an emphasis on the development and integration of operational strategies. The aforementioned strategies will be employed from the perspective of hospitality management and the application of program techniques in special event management. Topics will include booking, event programming and coordination, themes, program partnerships, and event promotion. This placement may require PM shifts or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Experiential Learning | Course #: PSSPWS350 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview
Students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management special project will be acquire and practice skills related to managing the wine and beverage service at GANZO, the school restaurant and creative learning lab of Apicius International School of Hospitality. Under the leadership and supervision of wine service professionals, students will also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a restaurant and/or wineries. The aim of the special project is to increase knowledge of wine service, presentation methods, restaurant procedures, wine expertise, and pairing in the hospitality industry. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Field Learning | Course #: PSFLCI200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning in different locations before session start: Rome, Tuscan coast, Cinque Terre (Fall-Summer); Rome, Orvieto, Perugia (Spring). The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This one-week intensive course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden ones awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and aims to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic, architectural, and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills. This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Field Learning | Course #: PSFLIF200 | Open
One week of on-site field learning with Italian families before session start. The course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviors. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behavior patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.Mandatory pre-departure readings must be fulfilled prior to program start
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Internships | Course #: PSININ450 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
The internship course aims to prepare students for the professional world and features an nonsalaried internship scheduled individually for a minimum of ten hours per week. Students generally serve as part-time interns from Monday through Friday, although some internships may require weekend hours. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and the guides the students preparation of a final analytical report and portfolio. The internship enhances students knowledge through field experience held in a professional environment overseen by a supervisor, who regularly monitors the internship progress and guides the students professional development. Candidates must meet the prerequisites for the internship program. Students must submit a cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area (for example, a photography or visual communication candidacy requires a portfolio). An interview is held for placement purposes. Placements will vary depending on the students language and professional skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PSSPBP550 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back and front of the house operations at Fedora, the school pastry shop. The hands-on experience is designed to prepare future pastry chefs for the production of pastries, baked goods, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on proper baking techniques, knife and piping skills, and mixing methods. Students will learn how to adjust recipes to produce both products in large volumes and specialty items. Students will also perform front of the house duties in order to complete a comprehensive vision and understanding of the activities, functions, and organization of a baking and pastry shop for future entrepreneurial activities. This placement may require early AM shifts, PM shifts, or shifts that take place on weekends. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Chef uniform (hat, jacket, pants, hard-toe shoes) required. Prerequisites: Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Contact Hours: 150
3.0 Credits
Special Projects | Course #: PSSPCA470 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Pre-requisite: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Through this special project course, students are involved in back of the house operations at Ganzo, the school restaurant. Under the supervision of an Executive Chef who manages the operations of the kitchen, culinary arts experiential learning students are involved in the daily operations of the restaurant industry. Line cooks are entry-level kitchen positions that focus on learning technique, speed, and consistency. Students must be highly motivated and understand proper preparation techniques, become familiarized with recipes to ensure consistency, gain a command of timing in the kitchen, reduce and manage food waste, handle commercial kitchen equipment, and perform duties as directed by the kitchen brigade. This placement may require PM scheduling or shifts that take place on weekends and holidays. This special project course features experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI). CEMI are dynamic learning environments created to foster learning through a structured interaction with the community. Students will be involved in learning by doing through real projects and integration with the local population and territory in order to remove cultural and learning barriers as well as to develop a strong likelihood for success in life. The experiential learning hours are fully supervised by instructors who track students step by step during their learning experience, monitor and advise according to student needs, and support student initiative. This unique learning model allows students to benefit from an all-encompassing educational experience based on theory and practice in real enterprises, learning of comprehensive operational processes, problem-solving, leadership, and management. Additional materials/Dress code: Chef uniform (hat, jacket, pants, hard-toe shoes) required. Prerequisites: Cover letter, CV, and material pertinent to the chosen area, interview. Open to culinary arts and baking & pastry majors or students who have taken previous coursework in the above fields. HAACP food safety and sanitation certification.
Contact Hours: 150

Sciences and Mathematics

3.0 Credits
Biology | Course #: SMBOAP200 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course provides a general introduction to the study of human anatomy and physiology. The course is designed for non-biology majors who want to learn the basics of anatomy. General properties of living organisms are considered while human structures and functions are emphasized. The class will study the creation of the human body, from cells to tissues, organs to organ systems, and finally the organism, along with the chemical and physical principles behind its operation, and the principal systems and their physiological processes will be discussed. In addition, students are given a historical overview of anatomical studies from the work of Galen in antiquity to the anatomical investigations of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Vesalius during the Renaissance. New and noninvasive technologies, such as MRI, that uncover parts of the human anatomy never seen before, will be introduced. Field trips include the La Specola Zoological Museum for its collection of 18th-century anatomical wax models.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Chemistry | Course #: SMCHHC470 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
Throughout history, science and chemistry have shaped the evolution of the world. This course follows the emergence of chemistry as a discipline throughout the ages, particularly from an Italian perspective and how it has been influenced by politics, morality, and society. Lessons will include a survey of renowned Italian scientists and their groundbreaking contributions that subsequently shaped the course of history and the field of chemistry as we know it today. Students will gain a working knowledge of the history and techniques used in the analysis and transformation of matter, and become familiar with the Periodic Table of Elements and the bonding of molecules.
Contact Hours: 45

Sport and Health Sciences

3.0 Credits
Physical Education & Physical Therapy | Course #: SHPPPT180 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
In the 1900�s, fitness pioneer Joseph Pilates designed and refined a series of exercises to rehabilitate himself from poor health and physical conditions from which he suffered in the early part of his life. Students will explore the health benefits and the physical practice of Pilates, a form of low-impact, whole-body exercise adaptable to all fitness levels. Students will learn about alignment, breathing, strengthening, balance, flexibility, and awareness as they progress through Pilates exercises and learn how to intelligently move their body. Students will also identify and evaluate the characteristics of exercises which are optimal for modern lifestyles, long-term health and wellness, individual needs, as well as rehabilitation and injury prevention. Basic anatomy and physiology as related to Pilates as well as healthy diet principals will also be covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sport Sciences | Course #: SHSSLN160 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sport Sciences | Course #: SHSSPT180 | Section: Sum 3 | Open
In the 1900�s, fitness pioneer Joseph Pilates designed and refined a series of exercises to rehabilitate himself from poor health and physical conditions from which he suffered in the early part of his life. Students will explore the health benefits and the physical practice of Pilates, a form of low-impact, whole-body exercise adaptable to all fitness levels. Students will learn about alignment, breathing, strengthening, balance, flexibility, and awareness as they progress through Pilates exercises and learn how to intelligently move their body. Students will also identify and evaluate the characteristics of exercises which are optimal for modern lifestyles, long-term health and wellness, individual needs, as well as rehabilitation and injury prevention. Basic anatomy and physiology as related to Pilates as well as healthy diet principals will also be covered.
Contact Hours: 45

Program Add-On: Cultural Introduction to Italy course (1 week / 3 credits)
The 1 week Cultural Introduction to Italy course can be added to any FUA summer program. The traveling course is comprised of field study and travel research on location in destinations unique for their local cultures, economies, histories, and societies. Students participating in this course arrive in Rome the week prior to their regular program start and spend one week participating in lectures, visiting historic and contemporary sites, tasting local gastronomy, and experiencing the culture of Tuscany. At the end of the week, students travel to Florence to complete their regular summer program. Students who wish to continue this course topic in Florence can combine the add-on program with the Florence-based course during the regular summer program for a total of 6 credits. Please note: students enrolled in this add-on program arrive in Rome on June 21, 2020.

Program Add-On: Cultural Introduction to the Italian Family (1 week / 3 credits)
The 1 week Cultural Introduction to the Italian Family course can be added to the FUA summer III or summer B programs only. This field learning course provides and in-depth study of social dynamics and interpersonal communication behaviors of the modern Italian family. The weeklong course features on-site learning and assessment in direct contact with Italian families allowing students to strengthen and challenge their perspectives of Italian culture and society. All students participating in this program live with an Italian family in Florence during the week-long course. At the end of the week, students move into their regular SAI Florence housing to complete their regular summer program. Students who wish to continue this course topic during the regular summer program can combine the add-on program with the Florence-based course for a total of 6 credits. Please note: students enrolled in this add-on program arrive in Florence on June 21, 2020.

Course Registration
SAI students complete their course registration directly with FUA through the FUA student portal. Upon confirming enrollment in the SAI program at FUA, students receive information for creating their FUA student portal and selecting their classes. FUA courses are competitive and registration begins months ahead of the application deadline. Courses will fill rapidly and on a rolling basis.

Course Changes
Students wishing to make changes to their class schedule prior to departure can do so directly by logging into their FUA student account. Students receive an email confirmation from SAI once the change is accepted. Students are permitted to make as many Add/Drop adjustments to their schedule prior to departure as needed. The last day to submit a schedule change prior to departure is approximately 6 weeks prior to departure. After the deadline, no changes can be made until the Add/Drop period in Florence at which time only one additional change can be made, no exceptions.


Pre-Departure Calendar
April 14 2020
Application Closes
Applications accepted after closing as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
March 30 2020
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
April 29 2020
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
April 29 2020
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
May 29 2020
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
June 28 2020*
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 6:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
June 29 2020
SAI & FUA Orientation
Mandatory orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, academics, policies, housing, and culture.
June 29 2020
FUA Add/Drop Deadline
Course changes are not allowed after this date.
June 30 2020
FUA Classes Begin
July 16 2020
Final Exams
July 17 2020
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.

* Students adding the Cultural Introduction to Italy course arrive in Rome (FCO airport) on June 21, 2020 by 5:00pm

* Students adding the Cultural Introduction to the Italian Family course arrive in Florence (FLR airport) on June 21, 2020 by 5:00pm

SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 3 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$4,650
Program Fee: 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included)
$5,850
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Add-on Course
1 week course prior to regular program, includes housing.
$2,450
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$275
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Shared
Homestay housing in shared occupancy room. Includes daily breakfast and weekday dinner.
$300
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement – Private
Homestay housing in private occupancy room. Includes daily breakfast and weekday dinner.
$490
Add-on Course Credits
Fee for enrollment over 3 or 6 credits.
$550 / credit
Add-on Non-Credit and Field Learning Courses
Fees vary and are paid directly to FUA.
contact SAI
International Mailing Supplement
When applicable, students are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$90

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Florence
$950 $1,800
Books
$50 / course $100 / course
Course Fees & Supplies
$50 / course $300 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$650 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $400 / month
Transportation within Florence
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $175 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Access to and assistance with international cell phone plans
  • Frequent SAI cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Dinner
SAI welcomes students to Florence with a buffet of traditional Italian delights to mingle and get to know participants.

Practical Walking Tour
SAI takes students on a practical walking tour of Florence’s historic city center to get oriented with their new home.

Hike to Piazzale Michelangelo
Located just outside the old city walls, Piazzale Michelangelo offers a bird’s eye view of the city of Florence. Students hike to the top, stopping along the way for gelato. As the sun sets over the city, the group can experience the centuries-old Vespers ceremonial chanting by Cistercian monks in the crypt of the Basilica of San Miniato al Monte.

Pizza Making
In this activity, students enjoy an Italian pizza-making lesson taught by a local expert chef. Each lesson teaches students how to make authentic Italian pizza from scratch. At the end of the lesson everyone gets to feast on their own homemade pizza!

Wine Tasting
Students spend an afternoon learning bout and tasting great wines, perfectly paired with Tuscan specialties.

Market Tour
The market tour begins in a charming café where students sip on a cappuccino and learn about Italian coffee rituals. Then, the group takes a tour of the historic Florentine food market and gourmet shops, and learns how to navigate a Florentine market with some tips and insight for how to spot the best products.

Walking Tour of Fiesole
SAI takes students on a walking tour of the hill town of Fiesole, a short bus ride from the center of Florence. Fiesole is the site of the ancient Etruscan settlement that later extended down the hill to become Florence. Traces of that period are still visible in Fiesole as seen in the Roman theatre, built along the slope of the hill. Fiesole’s clean, cool breezes have long been a welcome escape from the sweltering summer heat of the Arno Valley and this spot on the hill, with its awesome views of the city below, has been a source of inspiration for many artists, writers and thinkers.

Farewell Evening
Students celebrate the end of a successful term abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Italian meal.

The following housing options apply to the regular summer program. Please note that add-on pre-session courses have different housing arrangements during the pre-session time only.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing assignments are single gender; other housing configurations may be available under limited circumstances. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
SAI homestay families are thoroughly screened and are accustomed to welcoming visiting students into their homes. Homestays provide a shared (with another study abroad student) or private bedroom in the family home with basic furnishings. Daily breakfast and weekday dinner are included (no dinner on weekends). Please note that some homestays may be outside of the city center and require a commute to reach school.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law U.S. students studying in Italy for 90 days or less are not required to obtain a student visa. Therefore all U.S. students do not require a student visa for this program. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.