London South Bank University
Academic Year Elective 2017/18
24 – 32 credits

Students enrolling in the LSBU Academic Year program (both the fall and spring semester) gain access to wider course offerings than single semester enrollments in the fields of Applied Science and Engineering, since some courses run across the fall and spring semesters. All visiting students enroll in one of two required courses each semester: “London: City of Change” or “Made in London”. These are interactive, inter-disciplinary courses requiring student participation in a series of guided walks and site visits. Students then select elective courses for a total of 24 – 32 credits for the full year.


Application Deadline
June 1, 2017
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
One letter of recommendation
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)

Highlights

  • Academic internship placements for one semester
  • Access to more course options in the Academic Year
  • Course highlight: London, City of Change

Program Dates
September 15, 2017 – June 9, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Freshman or above

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit IELTS: 6 + with at least a 5.5 in each skill area



Applied Science
Arts & Creative Industries
Built Environment & Architecture
Business
Computer Science and Informatics
Education
Engineering
Health
Law & Social Sciences

Applied Science

4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_4_401 | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module will develop the students knowledge and understanding in anatomical language and human anatomy of the musculo- skeletal system as well as the physical and chemical principles that underlie physiological function and metabolic processes. The concept of integration and control in physiology is developed, beginning with the study of cell membrane function and leading to an appreciation of human physiology through an understanding of systems.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_4_402 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module will provide a foundation for student study of science at undergraduate level. The basis for the module will be the context, planning and execution of experimental work, along with analysis and presentation of experimental data. A substantial component of study will involve activities in effective written communication and the writing of laboratory reports in particular.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_4_406 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This is an introductory module providing a foundation for further studies in all areas of biology and biosciences. The cellular organisation of living organisms is introduced and the organisation and functions of eukaryotic cells are explored. In particular focus is the regulation of cellular homeostasis and metabolism, including the flow of energy and genetic information, cell death, renewal and differentiation and their relation to human health and disease. In addition, current research approaches and methods for studying cells and manipulating genes will be highlighted.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_4_409 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module aims to familiarise students with the fundamental principles of human nutrition as a multidisciplinary perspective relating to human health and wellbeing. Key concepts of nutritional requirements, food chemistry, macro and micronutrient functions will be explored. The relationship of diet to health will be explored with special reference to over and under nutrition states. Dietary recommendations for the maintenance of health and well-being are examined. Assessment of food intake is considered in this context. Factors determining food choice are reviewed. The role of nutrition in the context of physical activity will be explored.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_4_410 | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Biology
This module introduces one of the central principles of biosciences, that of quantitative measurements, their interpretation and analysis. The emphasis of this module is based around understanding the measurement process, the significance of the measurement units and the mathematical manipulation of the data obtained to produce results of use to the analyst. The relevant mathematical skills needed to achieve this are developed in conjunction with the introduction to selected analytical data processing software. The data will be derived from a variety of human, microbial and epidemiological experimental settings. On completion of the module students will have gained knowledge of the main basic mathematical concepts and the use of software in the treatment and interpretation of the measured data.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_5_437 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module is intended to develop students understanding of the research process in the area of applied human sciences. It will provide knowledge about main research principles and methodologies for data collection and analysis. The students will gain practical experience in developing a research proposal and analysing data with parametric and non-parametric statistical methods using both MS Excel and IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_5_440 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Nutrition, or equivalent
The science of human nutrition is a rapidly evolving discipline. This module will consolidate and expand on introductory concepts from level 4. The breadth of the subject will be explored including perspectives from physiology, cell biology, epidemiology and public health. Applied aspects of the area will be introduced and the human being as the central subject emphasised. Students will foster an appreciation of the multidisciplinary nature of nutrition and gain practical experience of assessing nutritional status.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_5_441 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Biology, or equivalent.
The module looks at various types of disease, including Infectious, congenital (genetic and acquired), degenerative, metabolic (endocrine and nutritional), immunological (auto immune, allergic, inflammatory) and nepotistic. The module also covers the basics of the immune system and diagnosis and therapy.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_5_443 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Physics, or equivalent.
This module will teach concepts and laws of physics that are fundamental for the understanding of human body systems. The module will also look at how these concepts and laws can be applied to develop medical technologies to examine and diagnose the function and disease of human body. Topics covered in this module include force, material, fluid, sound, electricity, optics, and radiation. The teaching of each topic will first be delivered through lectures to provide students with a firm understanding of the theory. Practical laboratory sessions will then be used to consolidate students understanding of the theories, and also to develop students ability and skill to apply these theories.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: ASC_5_447 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Nutrition, or equivalent
Improving public health requires a multi-disciplinary/multi-professional approach, in order to gain increased control over the determinants of health and wellbeing. In both developed and developing societies, an evidence based approach to public health is of increasing importance. This module gives an insight into a variety of key concepts associated with the complex influences on human health and disease. An epidemiological approach is emphasised and strategies for disease prevention and management critically evaluated. Various modes and means of communication to diverse audiences are examined.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: EAA_6_412 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Human Nutrition
Clinical nutrition encompasses the understanding of the role of diet in the causation, prevention and management of disease. This unit will examine these themes through examination of a range of disease states and associated nutritional perspectives. The role of nutrition in clinical science and the hospital setting will be examined.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: EAC_6_140 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Forensic Science. Offered for final time in 2016/17.
This unit is designed to give students' detailed knowledge and a good insight into the field of incident investigation. The lecture course will give a formal grounding in those techniques of risk analysis necessary to predict the probability and magnitude of an accident. The basic investigative process is described in detail. This is further exemplified by a wide range of case studies which include road accidents to aircraft accidents to industrial explosions.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Applied Sciences | Course #: SES_6_301 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Biomechanics, or reasonable equivalent.
This module has been designed to allow students to apply their knowledge of biomechanics within the clinical domain. It will primarily focus on clinical gait analysis and will develop the students understanding of the role of injury/pathology in restricted/abnormal movement. At the end of this module, the student will have an in-depth knowledge of the functional properties of a dynamic musculoskeletal system, mechanisms of injury/pathology, rehabilitation and 3-dimensional motion analysis procedures. The knowledge and skills developed will be assessed through a written piece of coursework in the form of a scientific report.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: ASC_4_411 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Chemistry, or equivalent
This module aims to familiarise students with the science and technology basis needed for the conversion of raw materials into food ingredients and the application of food ingredients in manufactured food products. The first part of the module establishes the history and scientific principles of food technology and preservation. The module will give a general overview of the principles of the science of food, the factors which influence the quality of food products and explores some current technologies employed in food processing and manufacture. Students will study a range of systems using suitable examples drawn from the production of meat, cereals, fruit and vegetables, seafood, dairy produce or other products and will adopt s farm to fork approach. Students will be required to complete an accredited training course appropriate for food handlers. Students will appreciate the legal controls applied to food.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: ASC_5_444 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module provides students with a sound foundation of safe food operations in the modern food and drink industry. In the first few weeks, students will learn about the legal requirements for production of safe food and appreciate that food manufacture and production operates under strict controls to ensure high quality and products which pose minimal risk to the consumer. The students will investigate the hazards to food safety and assess risk and learn the principles of modern food hygiene covering personal hygiene, hygienic design and maintenance of food premises and of plant and equipment. This learning will be enhanced and supplemented with visits to local food businesses and invited guest lecturers. Students will then appreciate the food manufacturing operations that enhance food quality and assure food safety including pasteurisation, chilling, commercial sterilisation, freezing and an overview of emerging innovative methods such as high pressure processes.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: ASC_5_445 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This unit is designed to help students to develop an understanding of food microbiology, to appreciate the principles of food microbiology and explore both microbial food spoilage and foodborne microorganisms. In this context students will learn about the hazards that microorganisms pose to food safety, evaluate the risk and apply methods by which food can be processed safely. This is a practical unit and students will continue to develop their skills in examining foodstuffs in order to enumerate and identify specific microorganisms. Emphasis will be given to the development, application and use of microbiological criteria for evaluating food safety. Students will be introduced to innovative analytical techniques used for the identification and enumeration of microbes.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: EAA_6_413 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Human Nutrition modules. Offered for final time in 2016/17
Human nutritional science is a rapidly advancing discipline. This module will draw on students’ background knowledge in the area and encourage critical evaluation of emerging topics in the field. The emphasis will be on the available evidence base and developing skills in interpreting and relating key nutritional points from complex and varied sources of information. The unit will be responsive to advances and breaking stories in the field.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: EAA_6_415 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Food Science modules. Offered for final time in 2016/17.
This module will build on the knowledge and understanding gained in previous modules to look at a few chosen topics in depth. These will be chosen amongst important food science and technology subjects. A variety of lecturers with expert knowledge will deliver the module hence ensuring both variety and depth of the subjects covered. Student will also use time on the module to critically evaluate topical issues. Where relevant, laboratory practical making use of advanced laboratory equipment will be demonstrated.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: EAA_6_416 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Food Science modules.
All food and food products intended for the consumer are subject to legal control. Over the years there has been a considerable amount of legislation in the form of Acts of Parliament and Regulations to ensure that food is safe, produced hygienically, is clearly described by label information and gives enough information to enable consumers to make informed choices. Currently there are proposals to improve the information given on labels to give consumers information about healthy eating™. Considerable efforts have been made to ensure that food legislation is consistent across the European Union. This has been achieved by requiring all Member States to adopt European regulations or to adopt specific Directives. Legislation provides an environment of ˜official control which is enforced by local authorities. Besides official control, food producers, processors, and caterers have developed a wide range of codes of practice and guidelines to ensure food is produced, distributed and sold to the highest standards of quality. These codes and guidelines reflect Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) developed over many years and describe requirements for chemical composition, personal hygiene, machinery, temperature control and packaging. The requirements for food control extend beyond the factory and the industrial kitchen to the retailers and ensure that food is produced to high standards of quality and safety throughout the food chain. Sustainability in relation to food production and supply has a significant impact on the Food Industry and can be used to demonstrate the multi-facet of food control.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: EAC_5_408 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Molecular Biology, or reasonable equivalent.
This unit builds on an understanding of the chemistry of biological molecules and applies these principles to explaining the nature, properties and behaviour of particular food macromolecules. Specific components will be used for illustration e.g. starch, lipids, proteins, pectin and fibre. The properties of many of these compounds can be influenced by functional chemicals called ˜food additives. The determination of all of these components in foods is essential for declaring compositional, nutritional and labelling information and therefore the unit will include practical learning material explaining the methods of analysis. Proximate and sensory analysis will form the major aspect of the laboratory analysis.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Food Science | Course #: EAC_6_414 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Safe Food Preparation and Food Microbiology, or reasonable equivalent
This module applies the principles of food safety, food control and food preservation to the development of a new food product. Food product development is essential to maintaining competitive advantage in the modern food and drink industry. Students will work in small groups to interpret a design brief and develop a new food product. To be successful a new product has to look good and taste good, then consumers will return to buy more. The food manufacturer must ensure that the product can be made consistently and meet all legal and supplier specifications. Good practice, accurate specifications and meeting all legal requirements in terms of due diligence are essential for product design and delivery of outcomes for the development process. This Module takes a practical, technological approach to food product development and deliberately encourages students to experience the constraints and conflicts arising from team work in the design, prototype and pilot manufacturing process.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_4_404 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module will extend the student’s knowledge of human anatomy and the musculoskeletal system, whilst introducing the basic biomechanical concepts and terminology that is required to analyse skilled and common movement patterns. This module will provide a clear understanding of the internal and external forces that act on the body, which can be used by the student to develop a comprehensive understanding of performance determinants.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_4_413 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
This module is designed to introduce forensic science students to the English legal system. It looks at the main sources of law; the hierarchy of the court system and the doctrine of precedent. It considers the role of Parliament in the creation of statutes, the rules which are applied to interpret those statutes and the role of the European Institutions. As an example of a statute, it looks at police powers under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984.
The module also studies the structure and the personnel of the legal profession including the judiciary; the role of lay persons such as magistrates and jurors; the procedure followed at trial and the purposes and scope of sentencing.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_4_414 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module is designed to introduce students to the scope and nature of forensic science. One of the main themes through this introductory module is to emphasise the various roles that fall under the forensic science remit and the skills required to perform well in a forensic science laboratory. The module is aimed at students with a basic knowledge of forensic science and aims to enhance this background knowledge. Students begin the lecture course by appreciating the relevance and application of the role of forensic science in the wider context. This module provides a general overview of what areas may be introduced over the three year degree course.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_417 | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introductory Forensic Science modules
This module will introduce some of the biological materials that can be used as evidence in forensic casework. The module will cover the following
A range of presumptive tests for body fluids. Practical experience of using these tests will be gained during laboratory sessions.
The nature and morphology of human and animal hairs will be taught. The differences between animal and human hairs will be investigated in the laboratory.
The use of immunoassays in forensic science. The students will use ELISA to detect controlled substances in mock body fluid samples.
The historical use of serology in forensic science. Serological techniques will be utilised to determine if samples are human or animal, and the species of that animal.
Aspects of forensic entomology and the Body Farm in Texas.
An introduction to anthropological techniques used in forensic science. (Workshop?)
An introduction into the role of wildlife and plants in criminal investigations. The students will study a range of pollens and diatoms in the laboratory.
The knowledge gained from this module will prepare the students for the Biological Evidence module in year 6.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_422 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Forensic Science modules
This module is designed to introduce forensic science students to the law of evidence. That is, to introduce non-law students to the function and operation of the law of evidence in the context of criminal matters. It concentrates on the concepts of relevance and judicial discretion, and teaches the students which types of evidence attract the rules of admissibility and why. Students are required to watch a criminal trial in one of the many crown courts in London or their local area to give them a context for the operation of the rules, and are taught a logical approach to analysing hypothetical problems relating to the admissibility of evidence.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_423 | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introductory Forensic Science modules
The Study Abroad Team are awaiting this module guide. For further information on this module please contact your provider, or the study abroad team.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_424 | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychology
This module is intended to develop student understanding of Sport and Exercise Psychology. The module has been designed to advance student's knowledge of theory and practice in the psychological preparation of sport performers, and as such will integrate the notions of research informing practice and practical experience informing research.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_426 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Sports Science, or reasonable equivalent
This module will develop the students knowledge and understanding of training theory and training programme design. It will focus on the responses and adaptations of the physiological, metabolic, endocrine and muscular systems to exercise training. It will also develop a thorough understanding of the theory and principles used in the design of conditioning programmes to develop physiological, metabolic, endocrine and muscular strength.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_429 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Monday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Core Studies, and Nutrition Health and Disease or reasonable equivalent.
This module will develop the students knowledge and understanding of the nutritional requirements of athletes and the metabolic responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. In particular it will focus on fuel utilisation during endurance, and the nutritional requirements of different athlete types will be explored. Evidence supporting the use of nutritional strategies in optimising performance and training will also be referenced.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_435 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Biomechanics 1
This module has been designed so students can apply their pre-requisite knowledge of biomechanics to the practical element of analysing human movement. It will primarily develop students’ awareness of the available equipment, techniques, and methodological considerations involved with biomechanical analyses. At the end of this, the student will be able to conduct a biomechanical investigation and link their understanding of Newtonian principles to sporting performance. The knowledge and skills developed will be assessed through a written piece of coursework and an end of module examination.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_436 | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module is designed to develop student application of interdisciplinary scientific principles and evidence-based practice associated with perceptual-motor skill development and performance.

Specifically, students will become proficient at:
1. Evaluating practice with systematic procedures and engaging in reflective practice to recommend improvements in the development of perceptual-motor skills.
2. Analysing the interdisciplinary performance demands associated with perceptual-motor skills and devising innovations to improve its development or performance.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_438 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Sports Science Modules
This module will develop the students’ knowledge of exercise physiology and a range of the laboratory procedures and skills used in the assessment of athletic populations. Building on the physiological knowledge developed at L4 the module will cover the acute and chronic responses to both high and low intensity exercise. It will also develop the ability to explain the fundamental factors that determine muscle strength and power as well as agility and quickness. It will focus on the responses of the key physiological systems that support exercise performance and the design of training programmes to optimise improvement and minimise/delay fatigue.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_5_456 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 10:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Biology
The biology of human beings as adaptations to the selective pressures prevalent in our recent evolutionary history. An overview of the Hominoidea, provided by the fossil record and our dispersal out of Africa. This unit reviews our physiology as an omnivorous mammal originally adapted to tropical grasslands. It goes on to review the extent to which human behaviour can be interpreted as adaptive for a social animal exploiting the range of habitats our species has exploited.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_6_432 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Sports Psychology
This module will help extending theory and research into the field to apply sport psychology into practice. A primary goal will be to teach the students to facilitate optimal involvement, performance, and enjoyment in sport and exercise. It will enable the student to study and apply psychological principles of human performance in helping athletes consistently perform in the upper range of their capabilities and more thoroughly enjoy the sport performance process.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: ASC_6_433 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Sports Science majors only
This module is designed to advance students understanding of strength and conditioning. It includes selection, administration and interpretation of exercise tests. It will develop the theory of periodisation and approaches to programme design to include sport and athlete performance profiling. It will evaluate recovery strategies and the issue of over training. Technological aids in optimising performance, such as hypoxia and vibration training will be addressed as will the challenges of certain environmental factors in order to support athletes in optimising their approaches to training and performance.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: EAA_5_139 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Core Scientific Skills, or reasonable equivalent.
The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the process of literature and experimental research. Statistical techniques are introduced to enable students to measure how well experimental data can explain proposed relationships between experimental data.
This is a module that builds on the first year Core Scientific Skills and introduces the concepts and skills that underpin scientific research, data analysis and problem solving. The opportunities and limitations of the scientific method will be explored in the context of how research is carried out. This module seeks to equip students with the skills required to undertake scientific research and problem solving (viz. through statistical analysis, data collection in the laboratory, risk assessment and project design/planning). A series of lectures and workshops will provide students with knowledge and hands-on experience of using statistics in an appropriate manner. The module acts to increase the students employability and transferable skills, and as a precursor to the final year research project ending in an assessed research project proposal.
The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills required for scientific research and systematic investigation. Students will learn how to develop meaningful research proposals and evaluate objectively and independently research findings. Emphasis will be given to experimental design, data collection and analysis and presentation/communication of research findings. Students will be introduced to the most common statistical techniques focussing on ANOVA.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: EAA_6_143 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Forensic Science. Offered for final time in 2016/17.
The module will cover areas of specialist forensic subjects and techniques. Recent trends and developments in the field of forensic science will be investigated and any topical subjects, such as changes in legislation or court of appeal rulings surrounding forensic evidence. This will be a versatile module, the content of which will be determined by the advancement of the field of forensic science.
Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: EAC_5_137 | Section: YR1 | Open
Monday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Forensic Science modules
This module will provide the students with a basic understanding of the approach and investigation of a crime scene and will provide students with practical knowledge of different types of marks and traces evidence that may be encountered at a crime or other scene. As any object may become physical evidence during a forensic investigation, the module will provide the knowledge on how to search for, recognise, collect, package, preserve, analyse and report upon marks and trace evidence. The concepts of forensic identification, forensic individualisation, and forensic documentation will each assume a prominent role. The module consists of both lectures and laboratory practical sessions. The theory for each evidence type will be taught in the lecture sessions and then the student will be expected to carry out laboratory examinations and analysis of the relevant evidence type. The laboratory practical's are recorded using documentation similar to that used in operational forensic laboratories and the final product will be a written witness statement for a court of law, which will be used to complete a mock courtroom exercise.
Contact Hours: 120
8.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: EAC_5_137. | Section: YR1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Introductory Forensic Science modules
This module will provide the students with an in depth understanding of microprocessor based instrumentation and measurement principles used in the instrumental analysis of materials of forensic significance. Theory will be taught by a series of microprocessor based workshops and through the use of laboratory based exercises where a number of highly significant instruments will be used.

Emphasis is given to a broad understanding of electronic measurement systems with emphasis on embedded microprocessors for data acquisition and control and computer based user interfaces. Basic control algorithms and real time data processing will be introduced looking at the parameters which are important in signal processing particularly with respect to accuracy, precision and resolution. Microprocessor based workshops will be used to teach this section of the course

Students will be introduced to instrumental laboratory analysis through a series of 3 hour laboratory practical's. These will cover common techniques of spectrometric and chromatographic analysis together with their underlying measurement principles.


Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.
Infrared FTIR spectroscopy
Ultra-violet spectrophotometry
Gas chromatography and flame photometry
Mass spectrometry
High Performance liquid chromatography
Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis
Scanning Electron Microscopy and energy dispersive
X ray analysis.
Atomic adsorption spectrophotometry
Thin layer chromatography
Image analysis using optical microscopy

It is expected that these lab based activities will be spread over the whole academic year.
Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
Human Science | Course #: FBS_6_306 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Molecular Biology, or reasonable equivalent.
Advanced molecular biology will further develop the ideas introduced in Molecular Biology. The course will focus on the applications of molecular biology in disease analysis, recombinant DNA and protein production and control of transcription and translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_EPA | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module introduces topics related to living in the world as a developing, thinking, social and individual being. Topics will include memory, perception, attention, cognitive development, interpersonal behaviour, group behaviour, intelligence, personality and aspects of atypical behaviour. Study in each of these will provide a framework for advanced study at level 5. In addition to knowledge, the module will provide the opportunity for students to develop skills relating to accessing, assimilating and communicating information as well as to be introduced to a variety of assessment techniques that will be encountered on the course.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_ERW | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 9:30 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychology, or equivalent, plus advanced Psychology courses
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore how theories, approaches and evidence from psychology have been applied to the real world. Students will be presented with a number of topics that have been important for understanding how people behave in the ways they do in the real world. Such topic areas will include thinking, social, and individual differences aspects of behaviour. In addition, the topic areas presented and explored in this module will inform students about a diverse range of psychology-related employment opportunities. Study in each of these will provide a framework for advanced study at level 5. In addition to knowledge, the module will provide the opportunity for students to develop skills relating to accessing, assimilating and communicating information, be introduced to a variety of assessment techniques that will be encountered on the course, and develop and be aware of the type of skills that are likely to enhance employability. Finally, the module will provide a focus for placements as a valuable way of gaining experience, and therefore enhancing employability.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_IPA | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Plus optional workshop for additional support on Thursday 1-4
This module introduces students to the study of psychology, first by discussing its conceptual underpinnings and historical development, then by relating topics to living in the world as learning, biological, and feeling/emotional beings. The module provides the knowledge-base necessary for advanced study at level 5 and 6, and also the development of skills relating to factual learning, i.e. accessing, organising, assimilating and revising information. This module will help students develop skills relating to MCQ assessments.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_IWP | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore how theories, approaches and evidence from psychology have been applied to the real world. The module will first introduce students to the notion of applied psychology as a discipline, what is required for entry into the professions recognised by the British Psychological Society, and also those employment opportunities that are appropriate for those who do not wish to pursue a career as an applied psychologist. Students will then be presented with a number of topics that have been important for understanding how people behave in the ways they do in the real world. Such topic areas will include the application of biological, learning, and emotional aspects of behaviour.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_PRM | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychological Research Methods
The Psychological Research Methods 2 module builds and expands upon the descriptive and simple inferential statistical methods introduced in Psychological Research Methods 1 (which module provides students with an introduction to the study of Psychology as a science.). Lectures and seminars consider more advanced principles of research design, qualitative data analysis, and statistical analysis using SPSS. The module is assessed by two practical report writing assignments and a short answer examination.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_4_RMI | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module provides students with an introduction to the study of Psychology as a science. It does this via the study of some of the key conceptual, methodological, and statistical issues that psychologists face when studying human behaviour. As well as issues surrounding experimental design and ethical principles in psychological research, the module also gives an introduction to the ways in which descriptive and inferential statistics can be used to analyse and make sense of experimental data. The module is assessed by two practical report writing assignments and a short answer examination.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_ERM | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychological Research Methods
This module is aimed at students on Psychology courses accredited by the British Psychological Society. The module is critical for an understanding of how to interpret the results published in journal articles and how to carry out and analyse your own research project in the final year. The module builds on Research Methods 1 and 2 so students are expected to have completed these modules successfully. It assumes that students understand the fundamentals of experiments, surveys, observations, and interviews. It also assumes that you can use a variety of descriptive statistics to summarise data and that you can carry out and interpret simple tests involving correlations and comparisons. The majority of the module is devoted to the design, analysis and interpretation of single and multi factor experiments. It also explains the use of single subject methodology in psychometric testing, single case investigation and single case interventions. The module finishes with a consideration of different approaches to research.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_PBO | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore a number of the major concepts, theories and methods encountered in important areas of the psychology of behaviour with others. The module focuses on those approaches that have been used to examine a) psychological processes from a social cognitive perspective, b) social influence processes, c) the social self and self-identity, d) social interaction and biology. In addition, the module will introduce students to evidence that demonstrates the use of psychological knowledge to applied domains. Key topic areas according to these themes include persuasion of others, the link between animal behaviour and our own social formations, intergroup processes, socio-cultural perspectives on the self and self-identity, and interpersonal interaction processes in relation to memory.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_PLM | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychology
Three themes, considered from the vantage points of cognitive, biological, social and developmental psychology, will be explored in this module. Firstly, how we gather and process information from the world around us, which covers perception and attention processes; secondly, how we use this information to act in the world, which focusses on how we learn from the information that we have gathered from our environment; and thirdly, how we remember what we have experienced, which deals with the cognitive and biological processes that underlie memory and the influence of socio-cultural experiences on memory. Theoretical, conceptual and historical issues will be considered as relevant throughout.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_POF | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions.
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore the interdependence between feelings and human behaviour. The module is organised into three themes: relationships, mood and sensations. Within each theme a range of topics will be explored, drawing on theory and research from biological, developmental, evolutionary, social, cross-cultural, cognitive and clinical psychology. Individual differences will be a key perspective in this module.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_PRM | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Psychological Research Methods
The Study Abroad Team are awaiting this module guide. For further information on this module please contact your provider, or the study abroad team.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_5_PTK | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Psychology
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore a number of the major concepts, theories and methods encountered in understanding how we communicate with others, solve problems and make decisions. This module will help students to understand the development of human communication, both cognitive and social. Students will learn what different psychologists think intelligence is, how it develops, and how it can be measured. The module will explore the internal and external influences on the development of reasoning and decision making. The module will explore whether innate mechanisms underlie these capacities or whether they develop over time.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_AAB | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
Works of art provide profound insights into human nature by creating forms and qualities of awareness that question and advance, while at the same time providing cogent ideas about, how awareness is comprised. Important works of art speak to and about essential aspects of our psychological make-up, helping us to develop and refine capacities of awareness, e.g., our perceptual and emotional sensibilities, as well as our understanding of awareness, i.e., the means by which constituted and how it is organised. Hence from the psychological point of view art is a gold mine, each work providing a highly articulate, indeed empirical, statement about how the brain constructs and responds to experience. Art intersects with the study of cognition by considering the appearances and meaning that arise from or as part of our experiencing the world. It is, in effect, another resource, which like the scientific study of psychology provides evidence, in some cases properly ‘experimental’, about how awareness works. Artists demonstrate their knowledge of brain and mental capacities not by analysing them but by providing formal, synthetic demonstrations of that knowledge as constituted by and represented in the work itself.
It may be the case that no other vehicle allows mental process to be studied and understanding conveyed in a first-hand, yet shared and objective way. In that sense art has a great deal to contribute to and may very well outstrip the academic practice of Psychology when it comes to dealing with the subjective world of experience. While works of art can be apprehended, with various aspects of its composition understood and evaluated, they cannot be ‘explained’ reductively, and herein is an important lesson; notably, that awareness is an emergent, constructive phenomenon, which although grounded in the physical processes and in response to the physical world around us can be constituted in unlimited ways in terms of qualities, form and meaning.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_CPP | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
This module is designed primarily for students who wish to go on to counselling psychology and psychotherapy postgraduate courses (as distinct from Clinical Psychology and other related professions) following their degree. Each week will include both a theoretical component and a practical component where students will be able to try out various approaches in role-plays and triad work. Triad work is a standard counselling training practice where students take the role of counsellor, client and observer and try out techniques in this triad. Students are encouraged to talk about general aspects of life or minor problems rather than anything they are likely to find distressing and are encouraged only to disclose information that they are comfortable sharing.
The theoretical component of the module introduces students to key theoretical approaches in counselling psychology and psychotherapy (focusing on humanist/existential and cognitive behavioural) as well as covering various types of therapy (one-to-one, group therapy, brief therapy and relationship work). There is a critical emphasis throughout the course considering issues of power, ethics, difference, and research on therapeutic effectiveness and processes. The material covered on this course will be similar to that in many foundation courses in counselling psychology and psychotherapy. Therefore it is important that students taking the course attend every week so that they, and their colleagues, get the full benefit. Students are also encouraged to engage in an appropriate placement or voluntary work during the year they are taking this module so that they can reflect on this experience during their course and in the assessment.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_CPP | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
This module is designed primarily for students who wish to go on to counselling psychology and psychotherapy postgraduate courses (as distinct from Clinical Psychology and other related professions) following their degree. Each week will include both a theoretical component and a practical component where students will be able to try out various approaches in role-plays and triad work. Triad work is a standard counselling training practice where students take the role of counsellor, client and observer and try out techniques in this triad. Students are encouraged to talk about general aspects of life or minor problems rather than anything they are likely to find distressing and are encouraged only to disclose information that they are comfortable sharing.
The theoretical component of the module introduces students to key theoretical approaches in counselling psychology and psychotherapy (focusing on humanist/existential and cognitive behavioural) as well as covering various types of therapy (one-to-one, group therapy, brief therapy and relationship work). There is a critical emphasis throughout the course considering issues of power, ethics, difference, and research on therapeutic effectiveness and processes. The material covered on this course will be similar to that in many foundation courses in counselling psychology and psychotherapy. Therefore it is important that students taking the course attend every week so that they, and their colleagues, get the full benefit. Students are also encouraged to engage in an appropriate placement or voluntary work during the year they are taking this module so that they can reflect on this experience during their course and in the assessment.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_DBB | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
This option focuses on infancy, a period of rapid development, and examines the emergence of perceptual, cognitive, and early social skills during the first year of life. Emerging behaviours will also be related to brain development, to facilitate a more thorough investigation of what happens during development. Traditional and more recent methods used to assess both brain and behaviour in infants will also be considered. This module also offers the opportunity to consider a dominant theoretical debate in developmental psychology, that of the relative contributions of nature and nurture to development. The first part of the module focuses on typical development, while the second part looks at instances where development is atypical, such as in the case of developmental disorders (e.g. autism and Down syndrome) or the case of extreme environments (e.g. visual and environmental deprivation).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_HTP | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
Morbidity and mortality have been shown to be influenced significantly by various socio-demographic factors like age, social class and education. Which factors create the link between these inputs and health-related outputs is less clear. This module will explore theoretically based psychological processes and mechanisms (e.g. cognitive dispositions and beliefs, social support, etc.) which have been shown to relate social inputs with health outcomes. In early sessions students will explore social inequalities in health. During later sessions a number of models used by health psychologists to study related decision making and behaviour will be explored. Throughout all sessions students will be exposed to applied implications and evidence derived from basic theoretical principles.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_NRP | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
This unit is concerned with the effects of brain damage on cognitive and social functioning. We will be looking at selected disorders of object and face recognition, attention, memory and social behaviour. We will try and understand each disorder by looking at a normally functioning system and then look at the kind of impairment that results from damage. Throughout, we will identify the relationship between a given function and its neural correlates. Finally, we will be looking at the factors that affect recovery from brain damage and rehabilitation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PSY_6_PAB | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Advanced Psychology courses
This module introduces final year students to theories of addictive behaviour. Conceptual issues surrounding the utility of theories will be addressed, and the empirical evidence for and against each theory will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to consider recent theories which attempt to synthesise extant models into a comprehensive account of addiction. Students will have the opportunity to apply, and critically evaluate, a number of theories in regards to their ability to explain alcoholism, both during seminars and in their coursework assignment. Finally, various treatment and preventative approaches, and the evidence for and against each will be examined.
Contact Hours: 60

Arts & Creative Industries

4.0 Credits
Arts & Festival Management | Course #: AAP_5_TLF | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 12:00 am
This module builds on the Level 4 module, The Arts Management Framework, which first introduces students to company law, charitable law, and governance. The Legal Framework focuses on the key legal issues involved in staging visual or performing arts productions, events and festivals. Students are provided with the knowledge, which they need in order to identify potential legal problems and issues, and the legislation and forms needed to solve the problem. The module enables students to adopt a proactive approach to best practice when complying with and implementing the law in arts & cultural organisations.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Arts & Festival Management | Course #: AME_5_MMG | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module seeks to answer this and other related questions by examining contemporary British and international museum and gallery practices. The module charts the evolution of the museum from the Louvre in 1793 to the present day, focussing on the major changes that have transformed museums since the 1980s and the debates that have underpinned these changes. Specifically the module explores the artistic, educational, social, cultural and political purposes of museums and galleries and the issues involved in developing, presenting, interpreting, contextualising and promoting collections and exhibitions for culturally diverse audiences.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Arts & Media | Course #: AME_4_CMF | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
This contextual module offers a variety of perspectives on the creative industries in order to understand concepts, practices, politics and industry orientations. It also aims to give you a solid grounding in critically studying academic and industry sources, engage in debate during seminars and produce a well-evidenced essay.
The lectures are shared between several courses in creative media practice:
Game Design and Development; Sound Design; Special Effects; Theatre Technologies; Visual Effects
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Arts & Media | Course #: AME_6_ECS | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Arts in education and community settings is a growing area of professional practice within contemporary arts management. This unit will explore a range of models across the sector in informal and formal environments, across art forms disciplines. The unit will interrogate motivations for community arts, explore philosophical and political approaches, define models of participation and evaluate mechanisms for sustainability.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Culture Writing & Performance | Course #: AME_6_MUS | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
The UK's vibrant and diverse musical landscape is made up of a wide variety of organisations specialising in various genres of music. Increasing numbers of companies, venues, and promoters are attempting to locate new talent, identify new means of mediation and target new audiences. This module will assess current practices, frameworks, management structures and outputs in selected companies within the context of the political, economic, social and technological environment in which they operate. The module will also locate the production, distribution and consumption of music, and its perceived value, in relation to key critical theories and debates around musicology and popular culture.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: AME_4_NMD | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
This Module will provide you with an introductory theoretical framework for considering the relationship between art, media, culture and technology and for developing critical reflection upon digital arts and media practice. This Module will provide an overview of the emerging forms of digital arts. It will examine the use of interactive media by photographers and artists in relationship to visual and performing art forms as well as the Internet as a site for art and media practice. It will further look at the way in which photographers, media practitioners, artists and art organisations are using the networked culture as a medium of communication. It will pay particular attention to questions of digital aesthetics and the user experience of interactivity and navigation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: AME_5_DSI | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
The module is intended to prepare students to research, critique, debate, write and formulate ideas about contemporary creative practice so as to enable them to develop and advocate for their individual creative practices at a professional and academic level.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: AME_5_MIM | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
The module explores contemporary moving image production and introduces students to professional post-production tools for motion graphics. Building on video and animation skills acquired at level 4, students will be able to experiment with combining imagery from a variety or sources to produce hybrid moving image work for screen.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: CRT_4_DDF | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module introduces students to the fundamentals of digital media through digital image manipulation, writing and audio practices. They are encouraged to develop a critical awareness of how images carry meaning, explore the relationship between word and image and learn about the expressive power of sound. The module offers students the opportunity to communicate their ideas and express themselves by undertaking a series of set briefs in which they experiment with digital image acquisition and audio capture, editing, composition/design, creative photo manipulation, audio manipulation and syncing. The set briefs also act as a technical introduction to understanding and handling digital media (working with digital libraries, differing file formats, resolution and compression, etc.) and an induction to the range of technologies available for producing digital media. The module allows year 1 students a good solid grasp of digital editing software and a foundation in understanding workflow in digital design projects, as an introduction to modules in semester 2 and years 2 and 3.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: CRT_4_DJ2 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Digital Journalism 1, or reasonable equivalent
This module builds on the skills and knowledge learnt in Semester 1 and continues to outline the range of digital skills, enabling a story to be told in a variety of mediums suitable for online publication, that journalists are required to have. This module acknowledges the increasing emphasis and dependence on data for stories.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: CRT_5_RDD | Section: SP1 | Open
The Study Abroad Team are awaiting this module guide. For further information on this module please contact your provider, or the study abroad team.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Design | Course #: FAM_4_TMW | Section: SP1 | Open
This module introduces students to a range of approaches to contextual research and academic critique in relation to contemporary media practice. Exploring synergies and convergences across the disciplines of photography, design, film, music, fine art and digital media amongst others, students will encounter and engage in contemporary debates, positions and practices in the context of multimodal approaches to research. By extending their frame of contextual reference, and ability to engage in critical and creative thinking, the module will provide a grounding in academic writing, production research and idea generation in the context of an understanding of discourse at an academic and professional level.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Drama & Performance | Course #: AME_5_POA | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
This module provides an in-depth theoretical overview of the contemporary practice of adapting classic texts for new stages and audiences. The module also looks forward to Level 6 by providing you with an opportunity to develop a mini-dissertation and to write at some length about a specific area of theatre practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Drama & Performance | Course #: CWP_4_PHS | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions.
This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the historical context of contemporary drama and performance. Students will be introduced to a range of historically important dramatic literature progressing sequentially from the dramatists of Ancient Greeks to the work of the Renaissance playwrights. This will enable students to make connections and draw distinctions between different historical periods and cultures. Students will explore concepts relevant to the study of drama such as performance space, dramatic language and genre, the place of the stage in society and cultural and critical theories of drama.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Drama & Performance | Course #: CWP_4_TCP | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Thursday 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Friday 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Friday 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Pre-requisite: History of Drama, or reasonable equivalent
This module is a follow on from Performance Histories. It continues students introduction to the historical context of contemporary drama and performance, focusing on the first half of the 20th Century. Students will be introduced to a range of historically important practitioners and dramatic literature of the Modernist period. This will enable students to make connections and draw distinctions between different ideologies and performance styles. Students will explore concepts relevant to the study of drama such as performance space, dramatic language and genre, the place of the stage in society and critical performance analysis.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_4_CW1 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module introduces students to essential elements of the creative writing process, focusing on prose fiction. Classes will include structured writing activities and homework assignments designed to develop specific technical and creative abilities. Reading and discussion of published short stories will develop theoretical and analytical skills, enabling students to analyse their own and others work. By the end of the module, students will have completed a portfolio of short prose fiction for assessment. The module helps to establish good writing habits and presentation skills, as well as developing a critical vocabulary that will be useful to students throughout their degree.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_4_CW2 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module is designed to enable students to develop and experiment with poetry as a mode of creative expression through the study and production of poetry in a variety of forms. The module introduces students to the workings of rhythm, metre and rhyme; a selection of poetic forms (e.g. haiku, sestina, sonnet) and devices (e.g. metaphor, imagery, symbolism); and a variety of other conventions associated with verse. Students will learn about the technical skills of writing poetry by reading the work of established and emerging poets. Workshops will focus on creative production and methods of explication, where students will be able to apply close-reading practices to their own and peers writing. The module will also concentrate on other methods of evaluation and revision. Students will produce a small portfolio of original poetry for this module.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_4_NAC | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
This module introduces the critical study of narrative and forms of prose narration, including non-fiction prose writing. Building on the core skills covered in semester one, it provides the appropriate critical skills and vocabulary with which to analyse different forms of prose narrative, introducing a range of texts from different historical periods, traditions, and genres. It also develops key skills in the areas of academic presentation and essay writing.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_5_CGF | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
The module focuses on the theory and craft of Contemporary Genre Fiction, including thriller, fantasy, sci-fi and young adult fiction. The students will explore texts that set narrative patterns in plot, setting and character development, for various forms of genre writing, as well as those that play with genre patterns. The students will use those patterns as the basis for their own writing. Indicative reading includes contemporary British texts by authors such as Philip Pullman, Kate Atkinson, Mark Haddon, and Iain Banks, where students are introduced to the wider cultural and commercial contexts in which contemporary genre fiction is produced.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_5_LIF | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
This module gives students the opportunity to examine the transition from the written to the visual text, and includes a range of literary and filmic periods and genres. The module focuses on the ways in which written and visual texts share a background in narrative theory. Students learn how to apply narrative and film theory, as well as theorizing the relationship between the written and the visual.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AAP_5_WSS | Section: FA1 | Open
Writing for Stage and Screen offers students an introduction to the craft of dramatic writing. Students develop an original idea through an outline to a completed short (15 minute) script. Through reading play texts and screenplays, watching films and plays, reading about theory and a visit from a professional playwright, the students learn to watch theatre and film critically and develop their own creative practice. The course is practice-based, including writing exercises in every class, as well as writing workshops where students can support each other in script development.
Contact Hours: 20
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_4_PLC | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions
This module takes an interactive approach to the study of literature and aims to enhance students academic writing skills by integrating the practice of reading and the practice of writing into the teaching of the module. The module uses a selection of poetry, short prose narrative, drama and non-fiction and will focus on a stylistics-based identification of patterns of words, phrases and analyses of grammatical features. The module introduces students to critical responses to specific works of literature and facilitates their written and oral engagement with examples of literary criticism and narrative theory.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_5_ARP | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This unit will provide a general introduction to the specific subject of research in the arts and in the cultural industries. Students will be introduced to key research methods and theories applied in the interdisciplinary fields of art, media and cultural studies. The unit will address the principle approaches to designing and conducting small scale academic research. Students will learn how to generate and analyse findings as well as presenting research work and results in verbal and written forms. The skills and knowledge gained during the course of this unit will be directly transferable for assignments in other units and will also prepare students for the honours dissertation. However, students will not be permitted to replicate the research project for their final year dissertation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_5_CAL | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Wednesday 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Literature modules
The unit introduces students to a range of terms and issues which aid critical analysis and encourage students to develop a vocabulary of analytical language which can be used in the units seminars and, as appropriate, in other units on the degree.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_5_RDR | Section: SP1 | Open
Radio Drama offers students an introduction to the craft of dramatic writing in the context of radio/audio drama. By listening to radio plays and podcasts, students learn the techniques of using dialogue, sound effects and music to write a 15 minute script. The course is practice-based, including writing exercises in every class, as well as writing workshops, where the students will read their work and learn how to become script developers for each other. Students will also have an introduction to the recording studio to support their understanding of the production process and gain an insight into professional practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_5_TER | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Tuesday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
This Module studies the Greek and English Renaissance stages and explores original staging conditions, developing students understanding of the relationship between space, architecture and meaning, as well as examining their respective social contexts. We will examine the original performance conditions of each period and analyse the relationship of form to meaning paying particular attention to changing concepts of dramatic tragedy. Many of the plays are quite short, but that said, the reading for this Module is fairly heavy; the goal in setting the syllabus has been to expose students to a representative variety of tragic drama in the periods under examination.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English with Creative Writing | Course #: AME_5_WAL | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
This module focuses on twentieth-century autobiographical writing and explores the way in which writers use, extend and subvert autobiographical conventions. Students are introduced to a variety of writing, from canonical autobiography to less well-known contemporary womens and postcolonial autobiographical work. Each type of writing has generated its own body of criticism and textual genealogy and although we will not be looking at pre-twentieth-century work in detail, we will explore the histories and cultural contexts of a wide range of autobiographical texts.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Practice | Course #: AME_4_DCT | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Subject to availability and lab sizes.
This Module explores the history of documentary filmmaking along with the theoretical frameworks that shape our understanding of its claims to represent the world. A 12 week screening programme will introduce students to the major documentary modalities, including those that problematise notions of truth, history and objectivity. The module will also consider how technological, ideological and aesthetic factors impact upon documentary filmmaking and its reception.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Practice | Course #: AME_4_DPR | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Subject to availability and lab sizes.
In this Module students will conduct research into a documentary subject, collaboratively develop and produce a short documentary film, and reflectively engage with documentary practice through theory. The Module explores theoretical and methodological frameworks that shape our understanding of documentary practice and reception, including the nature of documentarys truth claims and the work of audiences in deciphering such claims. Students will be asked to respond to the major documentary modes, and to reflect through their filmmaking on the relationship between their documentary subject and their method.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Practice | Course #: AME_4_EMN | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Subject to availability and lab sizes.
This Module offers both practical training in the use of editing and effects software (Adobe Creative Suite), and seminars that explore the history and theory of montage. Practice and theory are linked in this Module in such a way that students are able to explore editing techniques while thinking conceptually about what editing means in different contexts. In addition to facilitating students development of practical skills, this Module will introduce students to different theoretical and ideological approaches to editing, from the political formalism of dialectical montage, to the poetics of collage, and the suturing instinct of continuity editing.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Practice | Course #: AME_4_VTC | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Subject to availability and lab sizes.
This module provides an introduction to working with digital video cameras, lights, sound and basic editing. Students will light and shoot a short scene consisting of a conversation between two people. In the process students will be introduced to what it means to cover a scene, and to the practicalities of editing together sound and image from different shots and different takes.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Practice | Course #: AME_5_SOF | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introductory Sound Recording modules or reasonable equivalent
This module will cover the skills necessary for you to be able to achieve good, clean sound for film. This module provides an overview of these skills which you will then be able to build upon and develop. We will be looking at the whole process involved in producing sound for film: planning and pre-production, location sound and post-production. It is relatively easy to render high quality HD images with even the simplest cameras it is more challenging to record and mix high quality sound. This module is designed to get you working confidently with music and sound, in order to achieve the best possible marrying of picture and to make most of the intrinsic added value of the good use of sound. Music and sound design for film demands creative and technical planning for good recording, mixing and final sweetening or 'fairy-dust' of the soundtrack. Throughout the semester, you will have the opportunity to build on the technical and analytical skills acquired at Level 4, through the production of comprehensive sound and music track design for a film sequence. You are required to work with both source and original sound and music, critically investigating how mood and meaning is constructed through the dialogue between the image and sound tracks.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: AME_5_AHI | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
The aim of this Module is to introduce students to the history and development of American Cinema. It will allow students to extend their knowledge and understanding of the growth of the film industry and their interpretation of image and meaning in film gained at Level 4. The Module will focus on key aspects of Hollywood Cinema including production, distribution, exhibition and audiences. It will go on to explore the relationship between Hollywood and Independent American Cinema and explore the latter in terms of an alternative representational mode to Hollywood. Students will also be given the opportunity to view a wide range of Hollywood and Independent films and to critically evaluate such films in relation to the major themes of the Module.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_4_RST | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module develops and builds on the content covered in ‘Reading the Screen: Analysis and Design’ and introduces students to a range of theoretical approaches to the study of film. It introduces students to the role of film theory as a criteria to understand and analyse movies. The module concentrates on a selection of Anglo-American and European film theory strands and narrative theory. There will be screenings of films throughout the module to explore the complex and meaningful dialogue between the analysis of film form and aesthetics and various theoretical approaches.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_4_RTS | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module introduces students to a range of different approaches to the study of film. The module introduces students to a range of narrative and non-narrative forms and offers a basic introduction to film style with a focus on the elements of mise-en-scene, camera work, editing and sound. The emphasis is on providing students with the tools necessary for the detailed and comprehensive analysis and interpretation of film. This module prepares students for the second semester, in which analysis will enter a creative dialogue with different aspects of film theory.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_4_SRE | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
The goal of this module is to achieve recording of the highest quality location sound to best facilitate students’ filmmaking ambitions. Sound is the one element that will most expose any shortcomings in your film production standards, and getting to grips with the basics here will go a long way towards improving the quality of your films. A big part of learning to record great sound is learning to listen, which in turn requires an understanding of the characteristics of different kinds of sound and the behaviour of sound in different environments. Such considerations as these are central to the module, while instruction on the most common filmmaking situations and the most common problems encountered when recording sound will give you a firm grounding in sound recording techniques and technologies. You can pursue an interest in sound further by enrolling on optional modules in sound editing and sound design in your second year
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_4_TRC | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
The received opinion of film history is that out of an initial period of incredible diversity of purpose and form arose a 'dominant' mode of narrative film which we still see, more or less intact, today. This module will chart this journey in the film's development, from the late 19th Century to contemporary digital cinema, exposing the diversity and testing some of the central assumptions of text-book film history. The module looks at the historical development of cinema and the film industry from its outset through to the Post World War II era up until todays digital cinema manifestations. The social and cultural significance of cinema is examined at key points, illustrating how a knowledge of history can deepen our understanding of film texts and contribute to a historiography of the moving image.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_4_WCO | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
This module looks at the historical and formal development of film and the cinema industry from the perspective of World Cinema. It considers the significance of film from around the globe (E.g. Eastern Europe, Japan, Latin America, Africa, India) and charts the development of a global film industry. The module follows the historical methodology signalled in the preceding ‘Rise of Cinema: Europe and America’ unit and aims to widen the theoretical and analytical focus to instances of national cinemas that have provided a significant challenge and alternative to dominant Western modes of narrative and representation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FAM_5_VOC | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module will investigate the relationship between cinema and the city as a vital and dynamic association that stretches back from the earliest days of film to contemporary times. The first section will provide students with a detailed understanding of the main critical debates surrounding modernism in the representation of the modern metropolis, focusing on filmmaking in Germany and USSR between 1924-1933. It will reveal cinemas dual and contradictory role in offering Distraction to urban mass audiences as well as providing spectators with an aesthetic experience of modernity and the city. The second part takes up certain themes identified in modernism and maps them onto cinematic genres through the later 20th and 21st century cinema through a series of cine-urban case studies.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: AME_4_DOP | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must attend both sessions; Student must have own Digital SLR Camera
In this module students will work on projects that involve interaction with people and their environment. Students will be introduced to visually exploring the world around them, using photography as a documentary practice to communicate to an audience. Students will be introduced to carrying out primary research into the subjects of the briefs and visual and theoretical research into ways of using photography.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CRT_5_GLJ | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Global Journalism will take as its starting point the economic, cultural and political shifts that have taken place since the 1990s. The module will explore contemporary ideas about the global™ and critically examine both the utopian and dystopian claims that have been made about global culture and technologies and the role of contemporary journalism. The module will focus on a number of key debates in relation to developments in journalism; the nature of globalisation itself, the emergence of global civil society and citizen journalism and ideas of press freedom. The module will also include contemporary case studies of global news events and journalists role in reporting them.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CRT_5_IJR | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module will focus on the techniques involved in writing for newspapers in general and in reporting and investigating on a controversial topic (crime, corruption, a scandal, etc.). This unit will allow students to work on news or an investigative project while exposing a ‘real life’ alleged failure of justice. The unit will address the techniques required for both the research/investigation (surveillance techniques, going undercover, archive research, use of anonymous sources, analysis of documents, scientific analysis, social and legal issues, and the like) and the writing of a final news piece. The unit will also address the consequences of investigative journalism, for the individual and for the society as a whole.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CRT_5_JRF | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module introduces students to a range of debates around the future of journalism as it goes online, interactive and mobile. It will enable students to examine digital journalism within a theoretical context to support any independent projects or research papers undertaken in their final year. It examines how technology has radically changed the way we receive and interact with news and current affairs and identifies what constitutes journalism in a global digital news culture and provides theoretical underpinning for the module interactive journalism. The module will present an overview of the issues and debates facing journalism as the industry struggles to cope with the implications of new technologies. In so doing it looks at the changing conceptualisation of journalism as a particular practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mandatory Study Abroad Courses | Course #: AME_5_LCC | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
This is an interactive, inter-disciplinary module which requires student participation in a series of guided walks and place visits. In addition to the scheduled lectures and seminar workshops teaching is delivered by a team drawn from the department of Culture, Writing and Performance which is housed in the university's School of Arts and Creative Industries.
The module focuses on London's development as a world/global city from the 19th century to the present day, examining its changing character in relation to historical and cultural contexts. Students read from a range of London-set texts - literary and historical - view selected London-based films and documentaries, and undertake a range of conducted walks with visits to sites of relevant interest such as the Imperial War Museum, the British Library, Borough Market, the Victoria and Albert (V&A) Tate Modern and Tate Britain, Brick Lane and Greenwich.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mandatory Study Abroad Courses | Course #: AME_5_LCC | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
This is an interactive, inter-disciplinary module which requires student participation in a series of guided walks and place visits. In addition to the scheduled lectures and seminar workshops teaching is delivered by a team drawn from the department of Culture, Writing and Performance which is housed in the university's School of Arts and Creative Industries.
The module focuses on London's development as a world/global city from the 19th century to the present day, examining its changing character in relation to historical and cultural contexts. Students read from a range of London-set texts - literary and historical - view selected London-based films and documentaries, and undertake a range of conducted walks with visits to sites of relevant interest such as the Imperial War Museum, the British Library, Borough Market, the Victoria and Albert (V&A) Tate Modern and Tate Britain, Brick Lane and Greenwich.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mandatory Study Abroad Courses | Course #: FAM_5_MIL | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
The module provides visiting students with an interactive opportunity to learn about London through the prism of fashion. Students will explore Londons development as a centre for the fashion industry, engage with fashion in its social, historical and cultural context and develop a growing understanding of Londons place as a strategic centre for fashion as a business.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mandatory Study Abroad Courses | Course #: FAM_5_MIL | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
The module provides visiting students with an interactive opportunity to learn about London through the prism of fashion. Students will explore Londons development as a centre for the fashion industry, engage with fashion in its social, historical and cultural context and develop a growing understanding of Londons place as a strategic centre for fashion as a business.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: AME_4_EOP | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
This module offers a thematic approach to studying histories and theories of photography, from the earliest experiments in the 1830s to the digital forms of today. Photography refuses any attempt to fix its identity, likewise any narration of the photographic is unstable, contested and in a perpetual state of flux. This story is a multifaceted adventure that takes us to the centre of art and visual culture of the last 200 years. The emphasis is on connections between theory and practice, word and image, and developing students abilities to articulate themselves when writing and speaking about images.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: AME_5_COP | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
This module explores the critical and cultural contexts for contemporary photographic practice, with an emphasis on the relationship between photography and network culture. Now that the majority of photographs are produced, shared and viewed online, how are the meanings and functions of photography and media changing? How, as photographers, are we responding to and reflecting upon our increasingly online and screen-based lives and realities? In order to answer these questions, you will be introduced to a range of work by practitioners and writers, and encouraged to reflect on the relationship between theory and practice in your own work.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: AME_5_FEA | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Have previous experience of photography, or an art and design based subject. Students attend both sessions. Student must have own Digital SLR Camera
In this module students will explore the use of digital photography in fashion, editorial and advertising contexts. Students will generate a project and create a portfolio of images, of a conceptual and technical quality suitable for one of these contexts. Skills appropriate for commercial uses of photography will be delivered through workshops in medium format digital cameras, digital post production, and output for web and print portfolios. On completion of the project students will present their portfolio of work to a panel in the format of a portfolio review.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: AME_5_PAG | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Photography, Art and Design, or reasonable equivalent. Students attend both sessions. Student must have own Digital SLR Camera
In this practice based module students create a body of photographic work for a gallery context. The module examines the wider political, cultural and social context of the galley and explores photographic relationship to both the gallery and fine art practices. Students produce work of a conceptual and technical quality to be shown in a gallery based exhibition.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: AME_5_SPP | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions. Photography, Art and Design, or reasonable equivalent. Student must have own Digital SLR Camera
In recent years developments in digital technology and advances in home printing and print on demand services have led to a rapid increase in photographers self publishing books, outside of the traditional publishing models. At the same time independent and mainstream publishing houses have also increased their output of photobooks. In this module students will explore the photobook as a means for disseminating work and creating an audience. Each student will photograph, design and create a photobook. Collectively you will host an event at which your books can seen and can be purchased by an audience.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: AME_4_SSQ | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
This module will introduce students to deconstructing and analysis of the key musical concepts of pitch, timbre, rhythm and genre. Students will learn different techniques to edit, process and arrange samples from pre-recorded multi-track arrangements. In doing so they will gain confidence in working with musical material using digital audio workstation software. The module offers students the opportunity to engage with music production and express their ideas in terms of music genre and creative context. The use of pre-recorded multi-track arrangements will act as a technical introduction to the process of layering sounds and handling digital file formats.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: AME_5_MIT | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Making connections between music, sound, performance and the moving image, within the intersection of technology, society and subjectivity, students are supported in further developing their analytical, research and writing skills. The module will thereby be supported in contextualising their production work and to develop study skills towards their final year Research Project.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: CRT_4_FRC | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module will introduce students to field recording techniques and the use of different types of microphones to develop an understanding of recording protocols in different locations. The key task for students will be to produce an edited project collated from location recordings that demonstrate their understanding of microphones, and the relationship between sound and the specifics of location. The editing process will introduce students to basic techniques, and also the cleaning up process (such as, EQ and dynamics processing). As part of the production process, students will be asked to document their work in a portfolio with detailed notes for each recording session.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: CRT_4_SIC | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
The module addresses the (re) production and mediation of music, sound, noise and silence in an interdisciplinary and conceptual manner. Students are simultaneously introduced to new academic study skills, such as library research, key text summaries, debate, essay planning and academic writing.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: CRT_4_SSY | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
This module introduces students to synthesised sounds as a component of sound design practice. They will learn key principles in shaping the timbre of a sound using subtractive synthesis as a basis to introduce other forms of sound processing. The module will enable students to develop their confidence through a series of hands on workshops to complement their understanding of software-based tools.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sound Design | Course #: CRT_4_STP | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module will introduce students to creating sound tracks for digital animations created by students on the BA (Hons) Digital Design course. Building on the modules in the first semester, students will produce sound effects and voice-overs while learning how to synchronise sounds to a moving image. The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to experiment with sounds to affect the narrative of visual media. This module will enable students to develop the production skills introduced in the first semester, and allow them to focus on developing an aspect of the final audio track as part of a production team (e.g. sound design, music, dialog).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Visual Effects | Course #: CRT_4_ITV | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 9:30 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions.
This module focuses on the core principles of Visual Effects in order to provide students with a solid foundation for understanding concepts, creative and technical processes involved in VFX. The module will explore how material is originated and the historical and current workflows adopted by the industry. Having understood key principles, the students are encouraged to explore VFX. Through a range of practical projects a core set of skills will lay the foundation for students to develop an industry focused skill-set. Practical elements equip students with a cohesive set of principals, which underpin some of the core skills. There will also be opportunities to explore the commercial frameworks that surround the current VFX industry.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Visual Effects | Course #: CRT_4_TVI | Section: FA1 | Open
Wednesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
The VFX industry module is concerned with industry and professional practice and the module will provide students with a broad contextual overview of the Creative Industries and the firms that operate VFX facilities, as well as individuals working within these organisations. Having a comprehensive view of how the industry operates, its current and future trajectory, knowledge of the key players and a student’s place within the VFX industry is essential in helping to develop a strategic and successful on-going career. Secondly the module introduces students to working practices. It’s increasingly the case that creatives work freelance, going from firm to firm on contracts that may run for many months, therefore these aspects are also considered.
Looking at everyday professional practice in connection with the VFX industry in more detail, graduates will be expected not only to have a high level of operational skills but to also be able to trouble shoot and pitch ideas to their team or production manager/VFX Supervisor. How projects are costed and managed is also of importance, as is having an understanding of how long each individual job or task will take. Students need to understand the real costs associated with each VFX shot and find the most appropriate, cost and time efficient way of producing the end result, without loss of quality, and understanding that any one element may need to be changed at any time. The module also augments the VFX Fundamentals unit by extending students’ knowledge by giving additional input around personnel involved in the VFX pipeline.
Contact Hours: 60

Built Environment & Architecture

4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_4_502 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
The unit consists of speculative, strategic and critical design projects, which examine differentiated conditions (urban, rural, landscape) for architecture.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_4_503 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
This unit integrates knowledge and understanding gained through other units in the year within an architectural design project of increased contextual awareness and organisational complexity.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_4_504 | Section: YR1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
This introductory course in architectural history and theory provides an outline of key concepts, buildings, cities, movements and personalities in the world of architecture. The two component module runs across the whole year. The focus in the first semester is on a historical survey of architecture, and in the second semester on cities and themes of urban interpretation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_405 | Section: YR1 | Open
Friday 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
The module is an introduction to structures in architecture, the terminology describing these, and the principles underlying their design and behavior. The major types of structure and structural material are reviewed, together with an overview of the work of structural engineers, and the development of approaches to progressive modern engineering practice. The second semester is an introduction to the principles and practice of constructional and environmental technology in small and medium sized buildings.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_507 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
This module draws upon references from contemporary arts practice and individual experimentation with a range of digital and analogue media. Students undertake design projects with an expanded understanding of context from a physical to a wider, systemic and cultural notion, which is addressed through the design of an object or installation presented in a final design event.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_508 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
Students are invited to investigate the relationship between site, programme, and architectural concepts through the design of enclosing structures.
Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_509 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
Students investigate and analyse the given site and wider context by making and documenting both cultural and imperial readings of the environment. These readings, together with individual interpretations and development of a given programme into a coherent and fully formulated design brief, form the basis of a detailed architectural response, resulting in a typically medium sized public building including external spaces and fully resolved interiors.
Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_510 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
The course demonstrates, through a series of case studies, buildings and architectural or urban formations situated in their particular socio-economic, political and physical contexts, from the period after the industrial revolution. The module runs for semester two only.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_5_511 | Section: YR1 | Open
Tuesday 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Friday 5:30 pm - 6:30 am
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
The unit investigates building technology from small to large buildings through precedent studies, thus aiding students in identifying and formulating the technological principles to be applied to their design projects.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_6_513 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
This module introduces students to the urban context, and develops an understanding of the physical, social and economic surroundings which architecture has to deal with. It will consist of two parts; Firstly group analysis work, focusing upon observing, interpreting and describing the urban context. Secondly, individual design work, with the aim of positively influencing the complex urban relationships observed. It introduces students to the themes and scope of the years design investigations.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Architecture | Course #: EBB_6_514 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must submit a portfolio of work for academic consideration before registering on Architecture modules
This module develops an understanding of the spatial organisation and form of buildings and how they interact with their context. Students will be asked to investigate an area of the city, building upon the skills they have developed in their previous design project. This research should inform an area of interest, which will be used to generate a brief. Students will then select one of the sites proposed by the studio tutors, and develop their design for the site, responding to both the context and to the building programme. The final proposal should address the spatial arrangement of the building within its context, as well as the spatial arrangement within the building, and aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between these. The module enables students to become aware of design approaches, ideas and methodologies for the final design project 303.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_5_464 | Section: YR1 | Open
Friday 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Friday 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Working in small groups, students will develop a fully integrated concept design for a building starting from the briefing and master planning stage. Selected elements of the concept design will be developed to a detailed design stage. The work will be carried out within the framework of level 2 BIM with appropriate information exchanges.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_5_465 | Section: YR1 | Open
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Thursday 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
The module gives an overview of engineering management and covers topics such as financial principles, management of innovation, technology strategy, and project management. The focus of the course is the development of individual skills and team work.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_5_466 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
To provide broad intermediate level coverage of theories, analysis and application of Electrical installation in buildings.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_5_469 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
This unit draws together knowledge and understanding from a range of systems subject areas and places these into the context of building services systems operation. The unit will provide a framework of knowledge to enable students to understand how systems are set to work, operated and monitored; and provide links between the design of systems and their on-site operation. There is substantial practise of the skills required to investigate, interpret and diagnose systems€™ operational performance.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_420 | Section: YR1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Thursday 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Civil Engineering modules. Students attend both sessions.
This module builds on the previous studies of structures and design. It will cover various analytical and design methods for beams, frames, connections and slabs.
Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_423 | Section: YR1 | Open
Thursday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
This module covers the highways and junctions classification, principles of traffic flow, traffic analysis, transport modelling and planning, transport safety, and junction design and analysis. Also covered are the highway geometrical design and the highway structural design including design traffic loading and materials in addition to related environmental and sustainability issues.
Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_445 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Pre-requisite: Structures and Technology B, Structures and Construction Management B, or equivalent
Part 1:
Structural Analysis of determinate and indeterminate beams and frames is developed in this Module at Level 6. It builds on the principles developed in the Structures and Construction Management Modules at Levels 4 and 5. The unit load and moment distribution methods of analyses are introduced and developed. The plastic theory of analysis for beams is covered here. Calculations for column instability are presented. Finally, the student is introduced to the usage of computer aided analysis using a commercial software.

Part 2:
This module extends knowledge of steel and concrete material use, analysis of structural form, and ability in design in both qualitative and quantitative directions. Problems from the AMIStructE papers are selected so that students can develop their analytical confidence to choose appropriate solutions, and presentations are given on a wider range of subjects and discussed in critical peer review.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_470 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
The module is designed to equip students with up-to-date knowledge and skills to enable them to work in the design, installation, operation and maintenance of lighting and electrical systems in building services industries. Lighting is covered at least as far as required to undertake design calculations and appreciate what is assumed in the use of proprietary design software packages.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_471 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Internal Environment and Comfort, and Thermo-fluids Engineering
This module provides an advanced study of heat and mass transfer and its application to: a) the design of heat transfer equipment such as heat exchangers and cooling towers and b) the study of heat transfer within a building envelope and the development of the CIBSE Admittance Method used for the assessment of cooling and heating loads. The effect of the building thermal weight on the cooling load and ways to reduce the cooling load and how these ways may affect the annual thermal energy are examined such as natural ventilation, night time cooling, evaporative cooling.
Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
Building Services, Sustainability and Acoustics | Course #: BEA_6_473 | Section: YR1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 10:30 am
This module examines the controls and processes that are necessary for efficient and effective operation of buildings and their engineering services. It provides an understanding of control elements and building energy management systems, and the way that information from these systems can be used to manage energy. The module also presents tools for financial analysis and reporting.
Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_4_040 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
This module will provide an overview of the theory and practice of surveying. The students will be introduced to basic surveying principles and techniques and develop a working knowledge of the use standard techniques and equipment. The module provides an explanation of basic principles of surveying, levelling, setting out of building works together with angular measurements using modern total stations, fieldwork and computations associated with levelling, dimensional control and positioning.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_4_050 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
This unit focuses on three areas of work; Design Principles, Basic CAD and Technology
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_4_060 | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
A unit to provide a broad and critical perspective on planning and construction as well as an understanding of the context within which planning and construction decisions are made and implemented.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_030 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
The module looks at the increasingly important role of energy and environmental factors which are increasingly impacting on buildings, their use, and their occupants. The aim of this module is to develop the students understanding of energy use in the construction and use of a building and the resulting environmental demands. As buildings consume a large proportion of the total energy used in industrial countries, students should be able to evaluate the design implications of poor energy efficiency in terms of cost, environmental impact and legislative consequences.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_080 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Thursday 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
This unit is primarily aimed at year 2 undergraduate students who wish to pursue a career as construction professionals. It provides a comprehensive analysis of contract law in action. It also provides students with knowledge of the principles and procedures underlying construction contracts and its solution to many problems inherent in contract law. It examines standard forms of contract and the underlying common law. It critically examines solutions to the problem of third party rights, the resolution of disputes and current developments in the law including the right to payment, and resolution of disputes by means of adjudication.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_100 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
This unit focuses on the range of techniques used by building surveying professionals in the undertaking of different types of surveys on commercial and large residential properties. It also focuses on the development of planned maintenance programmes and reviews financial controls and planned roll out programmes of work, facility and asset management, building and fire safety legislation, post occupancy legislation incl. the Party Wall etc Act.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_120 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
The module will focus on the QS techniques for appraising projects, developing cost plans, project budget and cash flow, controlling contract costs, valuation procedures and dealing with the administration of contracts and payments.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_130 | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Economics or equivalent
This unit is about the economics of the construction and property sectors. It focuses on providing a description of the construction sector and an economic explanation of markets and industries as well as some of the major features of construction products. Furthermore, it briefly provides an economic analysis of how investment, property and construction link together and to the wider economy. It also examines the role of regulation in dealing with negative externalities. Aspects of European construction will be examined and flexible production in the context of construction organisations will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_140 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
The unit will focus on the Contractors QS systems for appraising projects, controlling contract costs. Project budget and cashflow. Valuation procedure. Understanding applications for loss and expense. Sub-contract Payment.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_150 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Production Management, Construction Technology & Materials, Construction Technology & Structures, or equivalent
The module focuses on the time planning of the production phase in the construction of buildings and the need to complete the project within an agreed time span, to an appropriate quality and to an agreed cost using appropriate resources.
It develops a working knowledge of the classical planning / time programming techniques and the associated analytical skills to develop strategies that fulfil these requirements.
The basic elements of time programming, monitoring and controlling the production process are taught centred on the traditional Precedence method. The principle of Activity on Arrow is also reviewed. Human and Plant resources and their related costs are linked to programme for further analysis.
The traditional context of Line of Balance for manufacture will be discussed and it’s further adaptation in the form of Elemental Trend Analysis and Time Chainage for the Building and Civil Engineering industries will be taught.
Precedence and Line of Balance are brought together to illustrate the principle of Location Based Management – Trade Flow programming.
The computer programme Prima Vera will be used to summate the above classical time –resource -cost programme. (Vico software may be demonstrated for Trade flow subject to licence renewal). Students should also recognise alternatives such as Power Project and Microsoft Project.
Advances on critical path may be developed to include the principles of Project Cash flow, Pert Time and Pert Cost. Oracle (Primavera supports Risk analysis software).
Aspects of the philosophy of BIM is introduced by the provision of two Revit software based 3D Models which the student will use to prepare their coursework. Interrogation of these models will enable the student to understand the information that may start to be supplied to the contractor by the design team.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_180 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
This unit examines the various types of construction contracts, including families of standard construction contracts, and the common law and legislation and administrative procedures which govern them. It provides a working knowledge and understanding of construction contract legal problems, and related applicable law, such as non-contractual liabilities. It examines when a dispute arises in legal terms, and how dispute resolution methods may be employed to resolve problems and disputes.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_200 | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
This unit introduces the concepts of Building Information Modelling (BIM) through the development of architectural 3D models on industry standard parametric CAD systems. The unit covers the practical competence of architectural modelling and provides exposure on co-ordinating building information models.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_5_230 | Section: SP1 | Open
Thursday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
The Module provides an analytical approach to understanding organisations, how they are organised and typical cultures; the management of work groups and the roles of the individual in a work setting. Communication and leadership. It considers the development of management theory, through the Classical Schools of thought up to the present day.
A second theme introduces elements of human resource management, notably resource planning; recruitment; appraisal; dismissal; redundancy and industrial relations with particular reference to the construction industry. The Module provides a broad basic knowledge expected to be implicit in the general management of the firm; in organisational management and in particular, construction, project and production management operations.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_030 | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
The Module provides an analytical approach to understanding organisations, how they are organised and typical cultures; the management of work groups and the roles of the individual in a work setting. Communication and leadership. It considers the development of management theory, through the Classical Schools of thought up to the present day. A second theme introduces elements of human resource management, notably resource planning; recruitment; appraisal; dismissal; redundancy and industrial relations with particular reference to the construction industry. The Module provides a broad basic knowledge expected to be implicit in the general management of the firm; in organisational management and in particular, construction, project and production management operations.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_040 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Intro to Finance
This unit focuses on introducing students to the various principles of law and valuation which are relevant to surveyors working in the construction and property industries.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_060 | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
This unit provides knowledge necessary for the execution of the contractual duties of architects, building surveyors, property and construction managers in contracting and development companies, consultancy practice, public service and private corporations. It is designed to build on and apply knowledge obtained from a study of construction law. The unit is an introduction to the period of professional training necessary to qualify as a professional and covers key areas of practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_060. | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Construction Contract Law, or equivalent
This unit provides knowledge necessary for the execution of the contractual duties of architects, building surveyors, property and construction managers in contracting and development companies, consultancy practice, public service and private corporations. It is designed to build on and apply knowledge obtained from a study of construction law.
The unit is an introduction to the period of professional training necessary to qualify as a professional and covers key areas of practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_120 | Section: SP1 | Open
Friday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
This module focuses on introducing students to the various principles of law and valuation which are relevant to surveyors working in the construction and property industries.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_158 | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Thursday 11:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
To develop and understanding of the technical aspects of buildings in order to ensure good building practice and to reduce defects associated with new buildings. Since sustainability is steadily moving into mainstream building projects, the unit will also consider technologies employed and systems adopted to fulfil the requirements of the Building Regulations and other legislative controls.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_172 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
A Module to provide a broad and critical perspective on planning and construction as well as an understanding of the context within which planning and construction decisions are made and implemented.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_173 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
This unit is intended to allow the theoretical knowledge gained in a series of lectures and workshops to be applied in practice. The unit will consider the fundamental principles of valuation, valuation formulae and discounted cash flows. It will examine the methods used in the valuation of office, retail, industrial and residential properties. The unit will also introduce the process of development and redevelopment of property.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EBB_6_195 | Section: YR1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Law, or equivalent
This unit focuses on introducing students to the various areas of law and issues of professional practice used and applied in the construction and property industries.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EUA_5_403 | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Familiarity with CAD processes
This module introduces to students the Building Information Modelling concept and continues on the knowledge of 2D and 3D CAD and structural and stress analysis acquired in the first year of study. Buildings are modelled using Autodesk Revit software and then exported and analysed in analysis program such as Strand7 or Robot. Forces and stresses in the buildings elements are compared to the hand- calculated values. The impact of BIM on the construction industry is explored.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Built Environment | Course #: EUA_6_953 | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pre-requisite: An academic background in construction
To introduce students to the fundamental principles of the theory of sound and vibration. To give students an understanding of practical aspects of the behaviour of sound; and formulae used in the calculation of internal and external sound levels. To familiarise students with units and parameters used in the measurement and assessment of sound. To give the students practical experience of basic sound measurement and analysis using a wide variety of techniques and instrumentation. To introduce the students to the basic principles of room acoustics, sound absorption and insulation.

The principle learning outcomes are that the student should be able to:
• Appreciate the meaning of the terms sound intensity, sound pressure and sound power levels and the relationships between the three.
• Perform calculations of sound levels in decibels and appreciate the implications of using a logarithmic scale for sound level measurements
• Describe the weighting networks and understand their implications.
• Understand the mechanisms of production and properties of sound waves
• Understand the processes governing reflection, diffraction, refraction, interference and absorption of sound
• Define the parameters used in the measurement of environmental noise, and perform calculations in them
• Use basic sound measuring equipment including sound level meters and analysers.
• Predict internal and external sound levels
• Calculate or model the effects of sound absorption and transmission on sound levels
• Appreciate how noise can be controlled at source
• Appreciate how noise can be controlled using absorption
• Appreciate how noise can be controlled using encapsulation
• Appreciate how noise can be controlled using barriers
• Apply noise and vibration control techniques and their cost-benefit
• Appreciate how the application of careful design leads to considerably reduced costs
• Undertake a noise at work assessment
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Urban Environment | Course #: UEL_5_PER | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
The module provides an introduction to the fields of policy and research and has a strong emphasis on the development of practical skills. The increased focus by both Government and academics on evidence based policy will be explored leading to an examination of the relationship between research and policy and the processes of policy development and policy evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of the research process and have the opportunity to develop the skills and techniques required to undertake and evaluate research. The module will require to student to elaborate and apply an appropriate methodology to address an agreed research aim in relation to the evaluation of a relevant planning or regeneration related policy.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Urban Environment | Course #: UEL_5_PTM | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
This module examines transport issues for planning students. It focuses on the importance of modes of transport for patterns of land use and the construction of sustainable futures. It also examines how issues of power and equality underpin mobility: who can move, how and in what ways.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Urban Environment | Course #: UEL_6_SSP | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
The module explores spatial planning at the strategic level. In practice this can refer to planning activities at the regional, national and international levels. The European Union has dramatically increased the role of regions in recent years and the module examines the theoretical and practical elements in relation to regional development. Uneven patterns of development and increasing regional disparities are common at the level of the European Union and within many of the member states. However, more recently some countries, including England, have moved away from a regional focus in favour of a stronger emphasis on local areas. The module analyses the responses to the problems of economic, social, territorial disparities by examining contemporary processes and mechanisms of governance, government, policy and planning. The module focuses on the strategic spatial planning agenda at both the UK level and in the wider European context.
Contact Hours: 60

Business

4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_4_FAF | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Students must attend on 1 day. Please indicate which day is preferable on your module selection form and the Study Abroad Team will endeavour to place you in this session.
This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of the regulatory framework of accounting together with the qualitative characteristics of useful accounting information. It will also develop knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles and methods used in the recording of financial data and preparation and presentation of financial statements.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_4_MAC | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
The module will introduce students to the basic principles and practices of management accounting. It will enable students to identify how management accounting techniques can be used to support the management processes of planning, controlling and decision-making. The module will cover cost accounting principles, conventions and practices as applied to the ascertainment of costs and the analysis, interpretation and presentation of cost information.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_5_TAF | Open
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Business
The module focuses on the computation of the tax liabilities of individuals, including as an employee, or self-employed; and also unincorporated businesses, companies, and groups of companies. Assessment is via a three hour examination which is worth 60% of total marks for the unit; plus an individual assignment worth 40%.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_6_BPM | Section: FA1 | Open
Saturday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Business Manangement, Intro to Accounting, Micro and Macro Economics (or equivalent)
This unit builds upon the cost and management accounting principles covered in the Management Accounting Control unit and particularly focuses on the analysis and presentation of cost information for planning, control and decision-making.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_6_EFI | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
This module aims to provide course members with the knowledge and skills needed to critically analyse financial information and use it in the pursuit of opportunity which is an important element of entrepreneurship. Students learn to use finance & accounting tools to analyse firms in all phases of their life cycle, from the initial idea generation to ultimate sale of the venture. In addition participants should be able to develop a framework of analysis for business opportunities. The module is discipline based and stresses application, it is concerned with deal structure and contract design between entrepreneurs and outside investors.Pedagogy and organisation of the material is centred upon financial economic principles to focus on the financial problems associated with incubating and growing new ventures.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_6_EST | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 pm - 1:00 pm
The module builds on the students ability to apply financial management techniques, financial accounting analysis and management accounting forecasting. Having studied this module students will be able to assess an organisations current environment, make strategic decisions on the direction of the organisation, implement strategy and evaluate the impact of strategic decisions on the organisations stakeholders.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BAF_6_MAD | Section: SP1 | Open
Monday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
The module is intended to develop an understanding of the principles and application of the decision making, planning and control techniques required for reporting to senior management within an organisation. Recognising that many students on the module will not have studied management accounting before and will not necessarily be planning to work in a management accounting role, the module will develop an understanding of the key management accounting issues that students are likely to have to deal with in their careers.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_4_PEO | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
The module will give students an appreciation of the complexities of understanding people and behaviour within organizations. The module is incorporated with theories of organisational behaviour and people management practices and students will develop an understanding of how and why individuals behave in specific ways in the workplace.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_4_PRM | Section: FA1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Friday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
The module introduces students to the theories and practices of marketing providing them with an underpinning in the subject of marketing for further studies at levels 5 and 6. It acts as an introduction to the basic principles of marketing from which other modules can develop. These principles include the marketing environment, the marketing mix, marketing research and buyer behaviour.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_5_BET | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module will investigate the relationship between law and ethics identifying areas of controversy where ethical issues surface. To achieve this students will be introduced to fundamental principles of ethics and ethical reasoning so that they can debate ethical and legal issues and dilemmas. Students will analyse the fundamental role of law & government in the business environment, identifying the cultural, economic and political forces that impact on the process and evolution of business legislation. Finally, students will study how corporations are responding to ethical, environmental and legal concerns through the integration of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Business Strategy.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_5_HRE | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
The module will give students a thorough understanding of how human resource management works in an organisation from both a practical and theoretical approach. This module has been mapped to the CIPD Intermediate Certificate and would form part of the requirement needed to achieve the additional qualification along with Associate Membership of the CIPD on successful completion of the 3rd year HRM degree.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_6_IOL | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
Individual and Organisational Learning and Development is a core HR modules which enables students to gain an evaluative understanding of theoretical and practical issues involved designing, delivering and evaluating learning interventions. It incorporates the development of reflective practice skills,consultancy skills and the principles of continuing professional development.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBM_6_SBP | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Business
The purpose of the unit is to introduce students to the concept of small business planning, management and strategy. Highlighted are the differences in the planning and decision making processes between small and large enterprises. The unit stresses the fact that similar processes are involved in both small and large firms, but also shows that the greater degree of control involved in a small firm can bring greater rewards in terms of personal development.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_4_ECN | Open
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Business Economics, or reasonable equivalent
This module will continue to develop the students understanding of the essential micro and macro-economic theories which are the bed rock to the economic concepts and methods studied in Business Economics (Economics 1). The emphasis of the module is upon the theoretical frameworks underpinning the business applications of economics in facilitating the decisions of policy makers, managers, entrepreneurs in a variety of situations as well as the implications of the macro open economy on the operations of modern firms.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_4_ECO | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Monday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Pre-requisite: Students attend both sessions.
This module will introduce a range of essential economic concepts and methods and show how these can be applied to understand the world around us. The emphasis of the module is upon the business applications of economics in facilitating the decisions of managers, entrepreneurs in a variety of situations including pricing, advertising, financing, market entry and product developments. The module will also consider the implications of the macro economy on the operations of modern firms.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_BCT | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module enables students to appreciate the legal rules relating to the formation, contents, and methods of discharge of business contracts, and the consequences that flow from such contracts where they are breached.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_BDD | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
Entrepreneurs know the best feeling in business discovery and development is when the start-up venture is developed to a size that suits the needs of the market and others believe in its success just like the entrepreneur and a brand presence is established. This module develops on the principles behind what gives entrepreneurs the mind-set and drive to develop and expand businesses, establishing a market presence for their new venture, and launching a presence for the brand. The module gives entrepreneurial-minded students the tools to analyse, launch and establish presence of an enterprise venture within the any highly competitive market, to build a positive reputation. Drawing upon the discovery and development of business profiling which is achieved through big-data, to uncover patterns and relationships in establishing an entrepreneurial venture, within their local environment.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_DAN | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module introduces a range of specific concepts and quantitative techniques essential for the management of operations, production, material planning and quality assurance functions. It aims to enable students to process data in order to understand the root causes of various management issues related to the performances of the organisation. Observed data is compared to expected behaviour in order to determine why things happened, and provides a good understanding of a specific aspect of the problem that management wants to solve.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_FLR | Section: SP1 | Open
This module is aims at providing students with the survival language skills in a vocational context. Taught within the Level A1 of the European Language Framework Competence Framework, students will be taught the basic language skills to enable them to understand everyday vocabulary, basic grammar and the ability to communicate orally with someone at an introductory level.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_FPM | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module examines the role of project management within the business environment, the project life cycle, and various techniques of project and work planning, control and evaluation to achieve project objectives. The tools currently available to project managers are illustrated in this module through the use of Microsoft Project software and various other tools that are followed by the PMI and APM BoK (Body of Knowledge).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_IMS | Section: FA1 | Cancelled
Monday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Quantitative Methods, or equivalent
The unit examines some of the techniques of Management Science and uses them to solve a range of problems typically needing to be solved by managers who need to make decisions. The techniques used include linear programming, the use of appropriate probability models and a variety of decision-making criterion. Problems will be approached using both paper based methods and by way of the use of appropriate software.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_ISB | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Tuesday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Friday 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Intro to Business Systems (or equivalent)
The unit covers some interrelated areas concerning the way that information is organised, stored and processed by modern business systems, the role of databases in Internet search engines (Google / Yahoo) and websites (such as eBAY and Amazon ) The process and development of a business database including entity modelling, entity relationships, normalisation and use of MS Access databases. An Introductory coverage of structured systems analysis and design, data flow diagrams & decision tables Data warehousing and data mining. An understanding of aspects of business process re-engineering
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_MBI | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module is aimed at providing students with a practical understanding of setting up and managing small or medium sized enterprises and the importance of business innovation. Businesses are at the heart of any economy, especially small and medium sized enterprises. This module brings together theory and practice through an integrated speaker programme, which includes entrepreneur’s managers and innovators.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_MBL | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module demonstrates the importance of logistics and the supply change while also considering procurement and negotiation strategies and techniques within business services, retail and manufacturing environments. Students will gain a clear understanding of the importance and scope of the procurement function and will explore the critical transfer of goods/services across global and local networks. Including a critical assessment of ethical elements of supply chain management in view of business logistics.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_MBP | Section: FA1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module provides students with an introduction to the business, technological, ethical and societal issues pertaining to the emergence of the Internet as a medium for online trading of goods and services. The module examines the growth and development of the Internet as a business tool and explores how organisations have adapted (and continue to adapt) to this recent and continually developing digital business environment.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_QTB | Section: FA1 | Open
Thursday 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Thursday 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Quantitative Methods, or equivalent
The Module examines a range of ways of handling, analysing and presenting numerical information. Particular emphasis will be placed on dealing with financial information – annuities, gilts, investment appraisal & portfolio analysis. An introduction to the basic concepts of probability and their application is also included.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_ROP | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module provides students an overview of the key retail daily operations and the activities that retail outlets have with their consumers. Students will gain understanding of relevant management tools that help successfully formulate and manage retail operations. Developing on practical problems involved in running a retail business, from store and stock management, retail finances, through the role of the store manager to the contact between floor staff and potential customers. Considering the strategic and tactical issues in developing the relationship between retailers, existing and potential new customers. Enhancing the abilities to evaluate the practical application of daily retail operations.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_5_SMB | Section: SP1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent
This module provides a comprehensive understanding of social media in its design, implementation and use in a variety of business contexts. It includes the Social Media Canvas as a tool that determines how social media can be made integral to business strategy and thus aid businesses in achieving their objectives.
Contact Hours: 60
2.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_6_ESI | Section: FA1 | Open
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
This module studies the entry decisions of multinational firms and the role played by them in the modern global trading system. It considers different theories that account for the factors influencing a specific entry strategy into a foreign market. This is discussed in the context of the growth of the multinational company and its role in the growth of world trade over the past half century. The various options of exporting, licensing, joint ventures, franchising, and the establishment of subsidiaries through investment are all considered. Cultural factors influencing these entry decisions are also brought into the discussion at various points.
Contact Hours: 30
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_6_LBM | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Business Law, and Contract Law, or equivalent
This module is an introduction to the general principles of Corporate Law. It examines the nature and constitution of companies as well as the legal requirements relating to share and loan capital. The different treatment afforded to public companies by legislation is also highlighted, as is the impact of EU legislation and the Data Protection Act 1998.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_6_LPB | Section: SP1 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Business Law, and Contract Law, or equivalent
Legal Protection of Creativity looks at the intellectual property of a business. IP law refers to creations of the mind or intellect that can be legally owned. Ideas and unique creations can exist in every business. They are important for long term financial success and can make you more competitive than your rivals. This module looks at how to stop competitors from copying your most valuable assets; it looks at protection of and against marketing/advertising, information technology, accounts, and other business areas.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_6_MAP | Section: SP1 | Open
Wednesday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
The use of mobile apps has now overtaken desktop computing. More and more businesses are using mobile apps within their companies as well as providing products and services through mobile technology. They have ventured beyond basic services and are now offering games, location-based services, order tracking services, retailing, banking, health and medical services, and ticket purchases. They will develop more into other areas such as government and public services.
Mobile apps are designed to run on small mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and include wearable technologies. This module will cover key concepts in the design, implementation and business use of mobile applications.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Studies | Course #: BBS_6_MLS | Section: FA1 | Open
Monday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of level 5 or equivalent
Governments across the industrialised world are increasingly emphasising the importance of the development of entrepreneurship in achieving higher economic growth and prosperity. Government encouragement often takes the form of policies designed to help individuals start their own business. This module aims to explore theory and practice in the field from the perspective of individuals within a small and medium sized business. The issue of leadership styles and its impact upon the performance of SMEs is central to the study of this module. The successful learners will have the necessary competencies to be entrepreneurial making them efficient and effective employees, managers/owners, and transformational leaders in an SME context.
Contact Hours: 60