University of Westminster
Fall Postgraduate Semester 2017
15 credits

The University of Westminster offers postgraduate study abroad semester programs for students pursuing a graduate degree who wish to study abroad. Postgraduate semester students enroll in three 5 credit postgraduate courses from the variety of course offerings, including Architecture, Business, Media, Science and Social Sciences, among many others.


Application Deadline
May 1, 2017 (April 1 Priority Enrollment)
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Copy of bachelor’s degree
Official transcript
One letter of recommendation
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)

Highlights

  • Complete one semester of your graduate program in London
  • Various subject areas available
  • Courses are taken at one or more of the four London Westminster campuses: Cavendish, Marylebone, Regent, or Harrow

Program Dates
September 15, 2017 – December 16, 2017


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Graduate level

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.7 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 92, IELTS: 6.5, or equivalent.



Business
Media, Arts and Design
Postgraduate: Architecture & Built Environment
Postgraduate: Business School
Postgraduate: Media, Art and Design
Postgraduate: Social Sciences and Humanities
Postgraduate: Social Sciences & Humanities

Business

4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5BUSS005X | Open
Students undertake unpaid part-time work of their choice (internship), which can be at any level equivalent to two- three days per week over the course of the 12-week long module. This can be done in the day time and/or evenings and weekends. Employers are expected to support students in completing their weekly timesheets and in the development of skills and competencies required by the role, and by providing a written reference outlining their work contribution. Alongside the internship, study will comply with UKBA regulations with the undertaking of a full time course of study comprised of 60 UK credits per semester. The Professional and Personal Skills Development module along with the internship provide 20 UK credits and three hours of supervised teaching per week. Students will keep a weekly reflective log of events. The Professional Experience in a Business Context module provides a structured learning environment drawing from the internship employment. It covers Employment Studies (eg comparative analysis of UK and USA graduate employment), Organisation Studies (eg organisation structure, training, and appraisal) and skills development (eg presentation, interview and key skills). It requires interns to reflect on their experiences, development and learning.
The teaching materials will be delivered in the tutorials and will be stored in a portfolio in which students record their thoughts, feelings and reflections and develop items for assessment. At the same time students further prepare for graduate employment through the development of an understanding of their own aspirations and career plan needs in a Personal Development Plan (PDP). They also develop four key skills relevant to the module and reflect on their development in these using the Skills Tracker software tool stored on the university server. The students prepare a CV and give a presentation of what they have learnt comparing their experiences of working in the UK with working practices in their home countries and what they now can offer an employer.
Contact Hours: 60

Media, Arts and Design

4.0 Credits
Fashion Industry | Course #: 5FAMN011W | Section: 1 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module covers the theory and retail business practice of visual merchandising, product promotion and interior display. It explores future visual opportunities with regards to the digital space and technological innovation. It enables students to understand and evaluate the visual strategies that retailers employ in order to communicate their brand message, promote store image and increase merchandise sales. Students work on two assignments, an individual report and a group portfolio. The module combines the skills gained on the CAD and Illustration module from level 4 with facilitation to advance Photoshop skills, in order to create a visual merchandising solution for a specific fashion concept and store. Specialist CAD seminar sessions will be scheduled to review and develop the process and application of visual merchandising tools.


Assessment: Individual Report (50%), Group presentation of creative portfolio (50%).

Contact Hours: 60

Postgraduate: Architecture & Built Environment

4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 4TRN7A2 | Open
This module introduces students to debates within transport policy and politics past, present and
future. It draws on material from different disciplines in placing a range of relevant controversies,
ideas and issues within their theoretical, policy and political contexts. Students cover specific levels of
decision-making within the UK and EU, at which different topics are debated and decided, and learn
about non-governmental organizations, including lobby groups that influence transport policy making.


Assessment: Coursework paper (50%) ; In-class test (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 4URD7B7 | Open
Coming Soon
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7CNMN005W | Open
This module will examine the legal context within which construction projects are procured, managed and delivered. It will investigate the key areas of the law that affect contract management including Tort, Contract, Statutory Legislation and Dispute Resolution.


Assessment: Coursework (50%); In-Class Test (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7CNMN007W | Open
The module aims to explore different approaches to the strategic management of organisations; enable students to think critically and analytically; evaluate complex situations and make appropriate strategic recommendations; integrate strategic theory and practice.


Assessment: Referencing exercise (30%); Individual presentation (40%); Group presentation (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7CNMN011W | Open
This module aims to critically examine the entire process of procurement and delivery of complex construction projects through the project life cycle from conception to decommissioning; to critically evaluate the client’s strategic requirements within the context of the procurement of works, services and suppliers in the delivery of complex construction projects and to critically examine key issues in project management that relate directly to the successful delivery of complex construction project through virtual delivery team and supply chain partners.


Assessment: In-Class Test (20%); Reflective Portfolio (30%); Coursework (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7HOUS004W | Open
To give students the opportunity to undertake a theoretically informed and rigorously researched investigation and critical analysis of housing law. The module program supports students in developing an analytical, political and social perspective on housingand tenancy law.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7HOUS005W | Open
To explore competing management theories and their application to public sector organizations, particularly in relation to changing management functions and the changing culture of housing organizations. The module also aims to engage with the practical impact of managing mixed-income neighborhoods, evaluating neighborhood renewal programs and a commitment to sustainable communities.


Assessment: Essay (40%) ; Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PLAN012W | Open
This module is an introduction to the planning system in the UK. It provides an outline of the development of planning theory and practice and explores the current institutional, legislative and policy framework of spatial planning. It examines both historical and contemporary influences, and the emerging focus on localism and neighbourhood planning. It aims to integrate historical context, planning law, planning theory and planning in practice.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PLAN018W | Open
This module introduces students to a range of planning skills not covered elsewhere in core modules on the above courses. It covers core planning skills, appraisal techniques, and technical skills including project management, consultation and negotiation.


Assessment: Assignment papers (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PLAN019W | Open
This aims to explore next generation cities, investigating critical issues relating to climate change and other large-scale environmental threats and challenges through a cross-disciplinary perspective at a range of scales from the global to the local. A critical understanding of the concept of sustainability, encompassing notions of resource conservation, environmental, social and economic impact, quality of life and urban resilience, is essential.


Assessment: Presentation (15%) ; Seminar Paper (35%) ; Report and Group Presentation (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PLAN026W | Open
The module examines local and national policy-making within an urban context and explores issues affecting policy success and failure. It provides students with a theoretical and practical knowledge of policy-making and implementation, using contemporary housing and urban policies for illustrative purposes.


Assessment: Essay (40%) ; Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PLAN027W | Open
This module addresses the issue of how and why cities look as they do. It investigates urban form through history and encourages students to understand how and why particular patterns of development have come into being and why other visionary insights have not. Particular attention is paid to design traditions, philosophies and intentions, past and present. Students will be required to critically engage with the topics and to distinguish between the physical manifestations of different types of urbanism. There will be an opportunity to study in-depth key texts that are guiding contemporary urban design thought.


Assessment: 100% coursework (50% essay; 30% project; 20% seminar)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PROP004W | Open
Central to the study of property as an investment, is an appreciation that property is a class of asset that can be physically managed, unlike many other types of investment.This module gives students grounding in property as an asset class and a practical and theoretical appreciation of the techniques and practices currently being used in the management of commercial property. As well as appreciating property as asset class, a thorough knowledge of accounting principles is required. In the financial element to of this module, issues relating to accounting principles
and financial management accounts, and the implications of tax etc is considered Equally important is the appreciation of ratio analysis and strategy.


Assessment: Assignment (40%); Individual Report (35%); In-Class Test (25%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7PROP010W | Open
This module focuses on the financial, physical, legal and social aspects necessary for successful real estate development projects to take place and to be facilitated. Emphasis will be placed on the needs of end users of developments and those other key players in the development process. There will be an emphasis on commercial real estate development but the module will also serve well those requiring an understanding of mixed use and residential development projects and processes. The legal focus will centre on the system in England and Wales although techniques and examples will be drawn from a range of jurisdictions.


Assessment: Coursework (25%); Coursework 2 (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7TRAN001W | Open
This module examines the structure of the airline industry and the international regulatory regime within which it operates. You will analyse airline costs and revenues, relating them to financial performance, and examine airport economics along with key concepts in airport operations and planning.


Assessment: In-class test (30%) ; Coursework (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7TRAN014W | Open
Module aims: to provide students with the wider context within which logistics decisions are made ; to explore the ways in which government intervenes or influences the logistics system ; to examine the macro- and micro-economic influences on the overall demand for freight transport.


Assessment: Report (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7TRAN016W | Open
This module provides the foundation for studying logistics, ensuring that students are aware of the components of the logistics system and how they interact with each other to influence the design and operation of supply chains. It focuses on the aspects of logistics operations that tend to be directly within the control of companies.


Assessment: Coursework (50%); In-class test (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Planning and Transport | Course #: 7TRAN028W | Open
This module offers an overview of some of the fundamental principles of transport economics. The module emphasizes the theory and applications concerning demand, production and economics of transport systems.


Assessment: Coursework paper (50%) ; In-class test (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 7TOUR004W | Open
The focus is therefore divided into four aspects: responsible business practice; improving the quality of life of host communities; conserving the local environment and local culture; and sustainable design. Students will gain detailed subject knowledge and understanding of the planning and implementation of responsible practices and also be encouraged to develop their evaluative skills when analysing existing policy and practice.


Assessment: Coursework (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 7TOUR006W | Open
This module investigates how tourism shapes cities and cities shape tourism. It examines the continued rapid growth in city tourism, what cities can offer visitors and what visitors to cities seek. It looks in detail at the development of tourism in former industrial cities like Bilbao, tourist-historic cities like Venice, and world tourism cities and capital cities like London. Throughout there is an emphasis on understanding the visitor experience of city destinations, and how cities shape, promote and present themselves for visitors. Coursework is a study of a tourism city of your choice.


Assessment: TBA

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: AACI700 | Open
The aim of the module is to introduce students to the notion of the culturally sensitive designer, and to the subject areas and processes that such a figure may engage with in relation to architectural and urban design theory. A series of lectures and seminars will serve as a broad introduction to those discourses within the discipline of cultural studies that deal with issues of cultural identity and globalization, and which have a particular relationship to architecture. There will also be discussion and critical examination of those aspects of architectural discourse that have in turn sought to engage with the subjects of cultural identity and globalization.


Assessment: 100% coursework.

Contact Hours: 60
5.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: ATRS702 | Open
The growth of the experience economy has ensured that understanding content design is now important for tourism attractions, leisure and business events and conferences. This module explores the ability of effective design to engage the senses, in order to enhance experiences. It analyses the humanistic elements which lead to emotive changes and analyses the role of the participants. It also considers the management of the front-stage and explores the environmental factors which influence the ability to develop emotive experiences. The creative design processes are examined and the use of technology in achieving memorable experience is evaluated.


Assessment: Exam (50%) ; Coursework (50%).

Contact Hours: 75

Postgraduate: Business School

5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 4FIN7A5 | Open
The first part of this module studies the risk and return characteristics of international investments. Emphasis is given in the interest rate and foreign exchange risk. Thereafter, this module studies measurement methods and hedging approaches to financial risk. Finally the different approaches to Value at Risk models are examined.


Assessment: Coursework- Assignment 1 (30%) and Examination-closed-book- International Risk Management (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7ACCN012W | Open
The module explores the role of accounting in the management of organisations and the development and application of managerial accounting concepts and techniques with emphasis on practical applications, critical appraisal, contemporary approaches and international perspectives.


Assessment: Coursework (30%) and Examination-closed- book- Managerial Accounting (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7BUSS005W | Open
This module provides business managers with a comprehensive, practical approach to using financial and accounting techniques and analysis in their business lives. It also looks at the concepts behind the techniques, recent developments in conceptual thinking and academic critiques. It will give you the confidence and expertise to use financial techniques and concepts in business-decision-making. The interpretation of a range of management accounting and financial accounting documents. The use and evaluation of ratios and other quantitative techniques for corporate evaluation The use of capital investment appraisal techniques for the evaluation of projects The evaluation of both processes and outcomes of appraisal techniques and financial and non-financial performance measures.


Assessment: Coursework (40%) and Examination closed-book Financial Analysis for Managers (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7FNCE004W | Open
This relatively new and increasingly popular field which provides explanations for people's economic decisions by combining behavioural and cognitive psychology theory with conventional economics and finance. Traditional economics and finance assumes rationality as a basic assumption however vast empirical research shows that markets almost always have anomalies indicating that people do not behave or act rationally when investing. Behavioral finance explains how people make financial decisions and also enriches existing models and theories by offering new insights. Students will be exposed to new ideas and theory in this emergent field.


Assessment: Group Coursework-Behavioral Finance Group Report (20%), Presentation- Behavioral Finance Group Presentation (10%) and Examination-closed- book- Behavioral Finance (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7FNCE009W | Open
To study different types of financial derivatives and their global markets. To gain knowledge of the basic financial theories applied to valuation of financial derivatives. To develop a good working knowledge and understanding of analytical techniques used in valuation and applications of swaps.


Assessment: Coursework- Coursework 1 (30%) and Examination-closed-book- Financial Derivatives (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7FNCE010W | Open
To develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts and practical skills required by finance professionals as users, evaluators, designers and managers of computer based Financial Information systems.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) and Examination- closed-book- Financial Information Systems (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7FNCE020W | Open
This module provides an overview of fundamental topics in the fieldof finance, including investment, cost of capital, dividend policy, capital structure, corporate value, modern portfolio theory and financial instruments.


Assessment: Coursework- Assignment 1 (30%) and Examination- closed-book- Modern Finance (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 7FNCE021W | Open
This module will develop a systematic understanding of modern portfolio theory. Thereafter, studies will focus on a broad range of contemporary analytical techniques used in the construction, management and protection of a portfolio of financial assets suitable for institutional investors and in private wealth management contexts. The study is firmly grounded in theory. Your teaching of portfolio management will be informed by research. To provide an appreciation of practice, the module will also use a variety of elements that form a part of the Candidate Body of Knowledge of professional bodies such as: the Chartered Financial Analysts Institute (CFA Institute) and the UK Chartered Institute of Securities and Investments (CISI). Students will develop an awareness of ethical dilemmas and acquire ability to manage and work pro-actively by themselves and within teams to formulate and solve investment finance problems.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (30%) and Examination-closed-book- Modern Portfolio Management (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: BFIN734 | Open
The module examines the principles and practice of insurance and the operation of insurance companies in the life and non-life markets. It provides a solid understanding of all aspects of the nature and role of insurance, from basic principles through to industry practice.


Assessment: Coursework (30%) and Examination-closed-book (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Business Information Management & Operations | Course #: BBIT701 | Open
The module purpose is for students to gain knowledge of the topic, including the purchasing management process, negotiation techniques, supplier appraisal and the buyer's role, purchasing in the supply chain, technology in e-procurement and collaborative relationships in the international supply system. The emphasis will be on the supply chain, both internationally and in e-business.


Assessment: Group Presentation (30%) ; Individual Report (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Business Information Management & Operations | Course #: BBIT703 | Open
This module is focused on the study of sustainability and green logistics with a particular emphasis on procurement and supply chain management. The first part of the module provides the context for sustainable supply chains, examining the business and public policy reasons for attempting to address sustainability issues, and examining how sustainability impacts are measured, monitored and reposted. The second part of the module focuses on the procurement element of supply chain management covering green public procurement, environmental and socially responsible purchasing policies and organisational issues associated with implementation of these.


Assessment: Coursework 1: Sustainability measuring/reporting (40%) and Coursework 2- Company case study (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7BUSS001W | Open
This module uses economic and quantitive analysis to understand the external influences on business both a micro and macroeconomic level. The module explores the working of markets and various levels and how this affects business operations.


Assessment: Coursework- in module coursework (30%) and End of Module Assessment- Coursework (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7DVST002W | Open
This module covers the problems of international development finance, which include growth disparities, PPP adjustment, stabilisation policies, financial crisis and policy implications, domestic financial system and domestic financial development, rural and micro finance, international agencies approaches to development finance, aid, debt and other forms of finance, and the debt crisis in the developing and the developed countries.


Assessment: Presentation (50%) and Coursework- Essay (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7DVST004W | Open
The module is designed to integrate analytical and practical aspects involved in the management of development interventions. It uses a combination of weekly lectures, seminars and workshops. The lectures will be used to outline key concepts and techniques and these may involve contributions from outside researchers and practitioners. The weekly seminars or workshops will be used to review and analyse case study materials, but will also incorporate the active participation of students through presentations, and group discussions and debates. In addition, the module includes two sessions for which students will work in groups in order to analyze empirical cases and present the results in class: one will focus on a donor-led intervention and will require the critical use of two planning and evaluation methodologies. The second case will involve an appraisal of a development intervention in which the private sector plays a major role.


Assessment: Coursework- Presentation (20%) and Coursework- 4000 Word Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7ECON001W | Open
This module develops the students understanding and use of fundamental statistical and econometric techniques used in economics, namely, the Classical Linear Regression Model, Ordinary Least Squares and introduction to maximum likelihood estimation; testing linear restrictions; Chow test; problems of multicollinearity and misspecification; dummy variables; simultaneous estimation and the identification problem; autocorrelation; heteroscedasticity; time series analysis; stationarity; unit root tests; cointegration; error correction model; volatility modelling and forecasting; value-at-risk forecasting and model evaluation. Computing and econometrics software has seen substantial development during the last decades and students will learn to use these necessary tools.


Assessment: Coursework- Empirical Assignment (30%) and Examination-closed book- Data Analysis (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7ECON006W | Open
This module is concerned with both practice and theories of International trade and finance. It is related to issues such as classical and neo-classical trade theories, intra-industry trade, factor input mobility, trade policies, infant industry protection, economic integration, foreign investments, balance of payments, exchange rate regimes and their implications. It is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the underlying reasons for trade, shortcomings of the classical trade theories and some of the more modern trade theories. The module provides an in-depth analysis of technical progress and its impact on countries and their trade partners. The module comprehensively addresses the range of trade barriers and trade policies that have been in place since the second world war. Students will learn different degrees of economic integration and the way they can contribute to an overall change in trade pattern and welfare of nations. It will also examine the theories that explain the reasons for capital movement and foreign direct investment. The module covers some of the international developments of the last two three decades and explores the factors that contributed to the evolution of the European Union and international debt crises of the 1980s.


Assessment: Coursework- Presentation- Group Presentation (40%) and Examination-closed book- International Economics (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7ECON008W | Open
This module provides an overview of key concepts, theories and principles of Macroeconomics. The general focus of the course is the examination of both macroeconomic theoretical foundations and empirical literature to develop the analytical framework of macroeconomics underpinning contemporary macroeconomic policy.


Assessment: Essay (30%), Group Coursework- Group Presentation (10%) and Examination- closed book- Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7ECON009W | Open
This module examines the research methodologies and statistical underpinnings of economic analysis and policy. It develops the students understanding and use of fundamental statistical and econometric techniques useful in accessing and manipulating international economic data. The module deals with sources of information and techniques available for data analysis using appropriate computer-based packages.


Assessment: Coursework- Empirical Report (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7FNCE016W | Open
This module is concerned with both theoretical and practical issues related to international financial markets. It is designed to provide an in depth understanding of the structure and operation of foreign exchange markets and of financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies whose operations expand across a number of financial centres. The module comprehensively addresses the nature of exposure to risks that agents might face when operating across countries and the use of interest arbitrage and other hedging/speculative instruments in the spot or derivative markets. It will also examine capital movements, foreign direct investment as well as international diversification in the form of International portfolio investments. Finally, the module discusses microfinance institutions and policies towards these.


Assessment: Coursework- Group Presentation and Project (40%) and Examination- closed-book- Global Financial Markets (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 7HURM006W | Open
This module provides learners with an understanding of the principal environmental contexts of contemporary organisations within which managers, HR professionals and other employees interact in conditions of change and uncertainty. It also examines how organisations respond to these dynamic environmental contexts.


Assessment: In-Class Test/Assignment Exam Conditions (50%) and Examination- closed book- Human Resource Management in a Business Context (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Human Resource Management | Course #: 7HURM003W | Open
The module aims to encourage students to develop and critically reflect upon their knowledge of UK employee relations from a number of different theoretical, ethical and behavioral perspectives. The holistic importance of ER within an organization is emphasized so that students are aware of the importance of aligning HR policies with business strategy, change processes, employee involvement and organisational goals. Attention is focused on a wide range of practical influences and examples from the national and international arenas, covering areas such as: the psychological contract employee engagement, flexible working, workforce diversity, discipline, employee voice/involvement, union recognition and partnership agreements. Particular weight is placed on the ability to diagnose the causes of employee relations problems, to make practical suggestions for the resolution of these problems and to analyze the context in which they occur - whether they be in small or large, private or public, union or non-union organizations.


Assessment: Coursework- Presentation (20%) and Coursework- 4000 Word Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Human Resource Management | Course #: 7HURM013W | Open
Uses concepts and modes of analysis from the social sciences to develop a mastery of both practical and theoretical issues in the study of organisations and their development. Examines ways in which employee attitudes, organisational structures, technologies, work processes, cultures and the relations of authority, power and conflict or co-operation that they engender may be linked to wider social factors influencing organisational processes, design and development.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) and End of Module Assessment- Case Study Analysis (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Human Resource Management | Course #: 7HURM015W | Open
The module concentrates on organizations need to build, develop and retain effective teams of people with the necessary skills, attitudes and experience to achieve organizational objectives. The module combines a practical focus on recruitment, selection, retention and dismissal with an appreciation of the strategic approach to resourcing and talent management in a global context. This requires a thorough understanding of employment markets (global, national and local) and the full range of resourcing options, including permanent employees as well as agency workers, subcontractors, consultants and outsourcing. A special feature of this module is a one day employee selection interviewing skills workshop.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) and Examination-restricted- People Resourcing (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Human Resource Management | Course #: 7HURM018W | Open
This module focuses on the management of reward systems. It explores total rewards in an organizational and international context and provides learners with the knowledge and understanding of environments in which reward professionals plan, implement and evaluate employee reward policies to support strategic organizational goals. The links between reward systems and employee behavior is critically analyzed using theory and case studies to develop understanding and analytical skills. Coverage includes recent developments in pay systems, benefits, job evaluation and contingent reward, as well as the essential skills and techniques of setting pay levels and managing pay; all within a legal, ethical and market context.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) and Examination-closed book Reward Management (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Leadership and Development | Course #: 7LEAD008W | Open
The module provides the theoretical underpinning necessary to understand the learning and development (L & D) process within an organizational context. Learners apply this knowledge to organizations to produce an informed, systematic and practical approach. Short tutor inputs will be developed through a variety of learning methods including discussions, case studies, seminars, workshops, exercises, and skill development activities. The program is essentially learner-centered. The program team of Course Tutors will seek to model the experiential learning cycle. Learner’s personal contributions will therefore be a critical factor in influencing the successful achievement of the learning outcomes. Current experience will be used wherever possible. This will be supported throughout the module by current relevant theoretical underpinning.


Assessment: Coursework- Academic Essay (40%) and Coursework Business Report (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 7BUSS016W | Open
This module introduces students to the principles and practices of strategic management and enables them to develop the skills and knowledge required to contribute to strategic decision making in organisations. By undertaking a group analysis project about a live company, students are provided with an opportunity to integrate their prior and on-going learning and apply it to a real world situation. This project, which runs throughout the module, enables student to identify, and use, the appropriate analytical tools to identify strategic problems and to manipulate complex and incomplete information. Keywords: strategic analysis, strategic decision making.


Assessment: Presentation- Group Presentation (30%) and Examination closed-book Strategic Management (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 7MARK001W | Open
This module represents a theoretically-informed study of marketing from a managerial perspective, covering marketing strategy development within a business environment context. The underpinning marketing principles are examined in their practical applications in an international environment. On completion of this unit the student should be able to identify key marketing problems and recommend marketing alternatives which are consistent with the objectives of the firm.


Assessment: Coursework (30%) and Examination-closed-book- Aspects of Marketing Management (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 7MARK009W | Open
This module provides a robust, comprehensive introduction to the theory, application and practice of marketing research as it applies to the management need for quality data in decision making and the need further downstream to support communications initiatives through their implementation, delivery and outcomes processes with the overarching need to reduce risk in investment situations. The module offers an international perspective and incorporates the evolving development of research practice using e-based interactions.


Assessment: Group Coursework (50%) and Examination-closed-book- Marketing and Media Research Management (50%)

Contact Hours: 75

Postgraduate: Media, Art and Design

5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 2FBM701 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The module covers the theories, models, tools and methodologies used in the field of strategic management specifically within the fashion business. It aims to enhance students' ability to play an effective role in developing, implementing and monitoring strategy within a business within the fashion or fashion-related, industries. The module especially aims to help students develop a critical awareness of the management of creativity and design within a global context. Fashion enterprises at every level inherently enjoy advantages as well as face the vulnerabilities of the market conditions. This unit opens windows into strategic and creative thinking, analytical evaluation, and business strategy development as well as the decision-making process .The business environment is constantly changing and this affects the market condition, business structure, strategy and style.


Assessment: Coursework (50%), Presentation (10%), In-Class Test (40%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7COMM011W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module will provide an introduction, at postgraduate level, to those theories of policymaking and international relations that can serve in analysing communications policies and their dynamic interaction at the national and international levels. To demonstrate how these theories may explain aspects of communications policymaking in specific countries in the Global North and Global South. To consider the part played by communications policies in global power relations.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Short Essay (20%), Coursework 2 Long Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7COMM013W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module will provide a comprehensive introduction, at postgraduate level, to the most important ways of approaching the fundamental issues posed by the relationships between the media of communication and social and economic life. It will provide you with an understanding of the problems posed by different intellectual traditions, and an ability to place those theories in their proper contexts.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Short Essay (20%), Coursework 2 Long Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7FAMN001W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The fashion business process and the dynamics of product sourcing shift constantly and need to adapt to identify business opportunities emerging around the world. Within the generic fashion business process developing managing and sourcing fashion products from the right locations to ensure you can work to create an organisation that can deliver the right product in the right place at the right time. Building profitable relationships with partners and suppliers, balancing both cost and risk with lead times are the key challenges facing the fashion industry. From the concept of an idea, making it commercial for a particular market and ensuring it reaches the customer when they want it, involves a complex route with a real understanding of the supply chain. This module is designed to give an overall understanding of fashion business management process from concept to customer. It will explore a variety of perspectives on product sourcing and supply chain issues with the aim of preparing students for the challenges of developing and maximizing product development with sourcing strategy whilst still responding efficiently and effectively to constant changes in consumer demand.


Assessment: Coursework (50%), In-Class Test (40%), In-Class Participation (10%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MECM002W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module provides students with a structured and coherent overview of the nature composition and function of the media industry from a management perspective. It will cover the specificities of the 3 sectors that together compromise the industry, the key environmental changes that drive issues and mgt and the nature and defining characteristics of media organisations.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (20%), Presentation (20%), Coursework 2 (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MECM003W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module provides a critical examination of the economics of the media and content industries. It analyses the revenue and cost structures of these industries and the economics of the key processes of production, distribution and consumption.
Assessment: Coursework 1 Market Report 2000 words (50%), Coursework 2 Essay 2500 words (50%)
*All transcripts are issued in UK credits.
Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MEDP001W | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - *Requires you to submit a portfolio of relevant work at the time of application
This module offers a comprehensive introduction at postgraduate level to written journalism, web journalism and basic audio production.


Assessment: Individual Feature (25%), Individual Profile (25%), Team Web Project (25%), Web Production (25%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MUMN002W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
Entrepreneurial business and finance for creative industries increasingly has a significant effect on the development and promotion of new talent and is particularly relevant to students from both a creative and entrepreneurial background. This module is designed to provide students with a solid introduction to media economics, financial management and entrepreneurship in the creative industries. It will equip students with the tools to analyse financial documents, analyse business finances and will provide insights into traditional accounting practices, as well as providing all students with the knowledge to produce industry standard business and marketing plans based on industry financial practices. It will examine entrepreneurial issues facing creative industry firms and small businesses and will provide an overview of the activities required in starting and managing a business.


Assessment: Presentation (30%), Coursework (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MUMN004W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
IP and copyright are central to the music industry where successful management of a firm's IP can provide a powerful competitive advantage. The module will cover works as diverse as songs, master recordings, videos, photos, writings, knowledge, ideas, prototypes and more. The module is designed to provide students with a firm understanding of the various tools to protect and manage IP. Trademarks, trade names, ancillary income opportunities, brands, personality rights, recording rights, publishing rights, digital rights, licensing concepts, contracts, contract negotiation.


Assessment: Mid-term Test (30%), Individual Research Paper 4000 words (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Industries Management | Course #: 7MUSI001W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module provides students with a historical perspective on the development of the music industry and aims to help them contextualise the current state of the industry and their place within it. Teaching is delivered in a weekly lecture and seminar session format. The first set of lectures is dedicated to investigating the histories of discrete areas of the music industry, such as copyright, piracy, music and media. The second half of the module provides a general history focussed upon the development of the post-war British record industry from the 1940s to the present day. Along the way, the usefulness of analytical such as Peterson’s ‘production of culture approach’ are also considered. The seminar section of the teaching sessions develop on the lecture content and involve discussion, small group work and other learning activities aiming to build upon knowledge and skills. Students are also introduced to appropriate research and study techniques.


Assessment: Coursework 1000 words (30%), Coursework 4000 words (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Practice and Art Theory | Course #: 7FMST001W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module introduces students to some of the major areas of concern that established film studies and will illustrate how concerns of authorship, genre and realism have placed the study of film at the centre of key debates about art, culture, politics and communication.


Assessment: Coursework (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Practice and Art Theory | Course #: 7FMST002W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
Examining different structures of the moving image industry in UK and internationally, investigating the processes whereby moving images are conceptualized, produced, broadcast or screened.


Assessment: Presentation (20%), Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Practice and Art Theory | Course #: 7FMST005W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module focuses on trends and developments in European Cinema since 1945; from neo-realism to art cinema; political debates in European cinema; popular European cinema; European film funding; European cinema and television; European cinema and Hollywood. The origins of the modern European cinema will be examined with special reference to its roots in the aesthetics and politics of neo-realism. We will also explore the possible demise of European cinema in relation to the pressures of Hollywood and the competition from television, the loss of faith in modernist authorship, and whether a younger generation is succeeding in reviving the European tradition under the influence of a post-modernist emphasis on style within the context of the European Community.


Assessment: Essay (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Creative Practice and Art Theory | Course #: 7TVST003W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The module examines the changing face of a number of television forms, including crime drama, political drama, cult series, and the soap opera. The history of such forms, their formal qualities, and the nature of their address to their audiences will be analyzed. There will be an emphasis on traditions of quality television and aspects of reflexivity.


Assessment: Essay (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Fashion | Course #: 7FAMN006W | Open
This course aims to provide students with a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of the management of creative people in organizations, at both strategic and operational levels. It also aims to develop an awareness of the major practical and theoretical dilemmas among individuals, groups and organizations, and to place managerial practices into an historical and international perspective, highlighting both traditional and emerging issues and their importance to develop a sustainable competitive advantage. This module will acknowledge the challenge of managing creative individuals in the fashion business and managing diversity and conflict which may arise. Through cases studies and in class group work students will examine issues and challenges inherent in recruitment, placement and retention of creative teams and the growth and compensation via human resource management. The course also focuses on organizational design, strategies and performance Students will explore various leadership theories and models, leadership styles and attributes, organizational change and development, and the role of the leader in establishing organisational culture and facilitating change.


Assessment: Group Coursework (50%), Coursework (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Media and Society | Course #: 7COMM012W | Open
This module will introduce you and enable you to identify a range of technologies involved in broadcasting and telecommunications. The module will familiarise you with the basic technical aspects and the historical development of each technology. To make you aware of the ongoing convergence of technologies and enable you to analyze the political (including regulatory) issues surrounding the technologies.


Assessment: Coursework 1Short Essay (20%), Coursework 2 Long Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Media and Society | Course #: 7MEDS005W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module will provide a broad introduction, at postgraduate level, to the political economy approach to analysing the structure and performance of communication industries in capitalist economies. It aims for students to identify distinctive economic features of media and relate these to the trends in the organisation of specific media industries. Students will consider whether and how the economics of media have been affected by the spread of digital technologies.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Short Essay (20%), Coursework 2 Long Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Media and Society | Course #: 7MEST002W | Open
This module will introduce students to key developments in the media and communications industries associated with the logic of globalization; To explores the complex nature of the globalization process, focusing on the emergence of both supra-national and sub-national developments; To examine the relationship between new contexts of production and questions of collective culture and identity; To identify key research agendas in the study of media and globalization.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Short Essay (20%), Coursework 2 Long Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Professional Communication | Course #: 7JRNL009W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
This module provides context for international students studying journalism. It begins with a review of different aspects of journalism and continues with a discussion of the relevant international policies, treaties and agreements that affect the journalistic environment. It also includes a student-driven comparison of different journalistic situations around the world.


Assessment: In-Class Test (30%), Coursework 1 Presentation (30%), Coursework 2 Essay 2500 words (40%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Professional Communication | Course #: 7JRNL013W | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - *Requires you to submit a portfolio of relevant work at the time of application. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
To introduce students to the basic skills of newsgathering and writing news stories and features and develop an understanding of how feature ideas are generated and "packaged" for different markets. Students will also build and develop contacts for incorporation in a student’s personal database.


Assessment: Portfolio (50%), Coursework (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Professional Communication | Course #: 7PURL005W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The module aims to provide and develop advanced professional and managerial skills in public communication and PR within a framework of graduate study to explore the design and implementation of public communication and PR strategies for delivering messages to defined audiences, both internal and external and to examine the techniques of financial management of public communication and PR programmers.


Assessment: Presentation (20%), Coursework 1 Pitch (40%), Coursework 2 Critical Analysis (40%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Professional Communication | Course #: 7PURL007W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
This module aims to provide and develop relevant professional skills for entrants and existing public communication and public relations practitioners within a framework of postgraduate study. Also to develop skills in media handling, publicity, new media and writing for different clients and audiences as well as exploring the constraints on the work of the public communicator and PR practitioner.


Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Professional Communication | Course #: 7PURL009W | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
To provide a critical evaluation of the political, economic and social context in which public communication and public relations is practised in the UK, Europe and internationally. To explore theoretical approaches to the practice of public communication and public relations. To analyze current trends in public communication and public relations.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Essay (40%), Coursework 2 Industry Report (60%)

Contact Hours: 75

Postgraduate: Social Sciences and Humanities

5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW001W | Open
The module explores the contractual and legal relationships of persons involved in a carriage of goods arrangment. It covers the international carriage of goods by sea, air, road and rail; with sea carriage as the main focus. In the context of sea carriage, it deals with the two principal forms of contract used for the carriage of goods by sea - the charterparty and contract of affreightment. Charterparty. Time charter. Concepts of seaworthiness, deviation, dangerous goods, demurrage, etc. Contract of carriage. Bill of lading. International sea conventions (Hague Visby rules, Hamburg rules, etc.). The problems of combined transport and other modes of carriage.


Assessment: Examination closed book (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW009W | Open
This module enables the student to analyse critically the principles essential to the application of International Commercial Law. It will also provide the student with the context within which International Commercial Law operates


Assessment: In-Class Test (50%), Coursework (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW015W | Open
Processes; arbitration agreements; jurisdictional and governing law issues; procedural substantive issues, public international instruments and case law, public and private arbitration institutions; sovereign and private entity issues; awards. The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate introduction to the study of private and public international arbitration. To include inter alia: relationships between disputing parties; between parties and courts; between tribunals and courts.


Assessment: Coursework Essay (30%), In-Class Test (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
Models of international corporate governance; inter-relationship between major stakeholders of corporation, including directors, shareholders and creditors; examination of global risks impacting corporate decision-making; ethical duties and social responsibilities of directors and various stakeholders; differences in cultural values relating to markets and the rule of law; focus on recent and current major legal cases and relevant regulations.


Assessment: Coursework Essay 5000 words (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW022W | Open
A study of law and policy relating to international development including the right to development in international law, international development assistance and poverty alleviation, law relating to UN institutions engaged in promoting development in underdeveloped countries, and law and policy relating to overseas development assistance in the United Kingdom and European Union.


Assessment: Presentation 1 (10%), Presentation 2 (10%), Research Essay (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW026W | Open
Investment banking principles and practices, fund raising from the investment banking perspective, business plans, private placement memoranda, prospectuses, confidentiality agreements, IPOs, current stock exchange trends and market requirements.


Assessment: Coursework (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW027W | Open
Introduction to Islamic finance; corporate governance in Islamic finance institutions; derivatives under Islamic law; Islamic insurance; Islamic finance modes and securitization structures and Islamic finance prudential regulations. The aims of the module are to: offer students a comprehensive understanding of the practical and theoretical aspects of Islamic finance and banking; provide comprehensive coverage of the essential principles underlying Islamic finance; review and critical assess the modes and legal structures of major financial transactions as followed by Islamic finance institutions; provide in-depth legal and financial analysis of securitization structures in Islamic finance; and assess and critically review the corporate governance structure in Islamic finance institutions.


Assessment: Coursework Essay 5000 words (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW028W | Open
This module offers the student an opportunity to evaluate and examine critically the law governing the international sale contract. The student will be introduced to the intricacies of international sale transactions, especially, the content of the contract of international sale, the use of standard trade terms (such as INCOTERMS 2000); rights and remedies, the Vienna Convention; examine critically the legal implications of international sale transactions; common trade terms in use; the relevance of the Sale of Goods Act 1979; the role of documents in certain contracts; areas of reform and change in the context of the move to harmonise or standardise trade law.


Assessment: In-Class Test (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW031W | Open
The module includes corporate finance, venture capital, actors and aims, sources and types of investment, finance contracts, corporate structure, exit routes, transfer of shares, basic drafting, basic accounting, regulatory issues and tax.


Assessment: In-Class Test (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW032W | Open
This module will provide the student with a critical understanding of certain legal aspects of the phenomenon of electronic commerce, with specific reference to the law on on-line contracting. To examine critically the legal and commercial framework for electronic commerce. To examine key aspects of the law of contract. To study English and EU legal provisions including on-line data transmission, on-line marketing, electronic payments, computer misuse, data handling, etc. To facilitate students learning of the applications of current law. To evaluate areas of reform and change.


Assessment: Examination open book (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW036W | Open
The nature of incorporation. International and national consequences of incorporation and non- incorporation. Role and effect in cross-border trade and investment. Property and risk issues. Power balance between multinationals and sovereign states. Control of multinationals. Accountability of personnel. To provide the student with an overview of the law relating to incorporation and non- incorporation of business enterprises.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay (30%), In-Class Test (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW039W | Open
The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate introduction to the field of dispute prevention and dispute resolution.Within this aim it is the intention to cover domestic, commercial,municipal and international aspects of the field, and the main processes involved in dispute prevention and resolution. The nature of disputes; decision making and justice; theories and processes in prevention and resolution; anthropology and jurisprudence of dispute prevention and resolution, evidence and decision making, governance, regulation and risk factors.


Assessment: Coursework Essay 1500 words (30%), Coursework Essay 3500 words (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 7LLAW046W | Open
This module will identify the origins and foundations of the legal regulation of the international community and its transformation over time. The module will provide an overview of the United Nations Charter model of contemporary public international law. It will examine the dimensions of the fundamental principles of contemporary public international law. The significance of contemporary developments in public international law, including the issues of human rights, protection of minorities, self-determination, and the constraint of state violence, and their impact.


Assessment: In-Class Test (50%), Coursework (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 1ISP7A1 | Open
The module introduces students to various theoretical approaches to (state) politics and examines different accounts of political action ranging from civil disobedience to violent confrontation. It discusses the challenges arising from old and new forms of antagonism and explores theoretical efforts to control and reduce the possibility of conflict and violence.


Module Aims:
1) To familiarize students with various theoretical approaches to the study of modern politics, particularly with reference to the topics of conflict and violence; 2) To enhance students’ capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the contemporary theoretical interpretations of modern politics; 3) To foster an awareness of the need to synthesize contemporary perspectives in political theory and international relations.


Assessment: Coursework- 5000Word Essay (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 1ISP7A3 | Open
The module introduces students to the competing bodies of thought in international relations theory, the debates they have triggered, and the way that IR theory has developed as a consequence of those debates.


Module Aims:
1) To enable students to acquire knowledge and understanding of international relations and to make use of the concepts, approaches and methods of international relations theory to critically analyse the contested nature of global, regional and national politics; 2) To examine at the Masters level ideas, theories, events and processes of international relations and to encourage students to evaluate their significance and implications for international politics; 3) To chart the development of International Relations as an academic discipline locating the dominant theoretical perspectives within their historical and political contexts; 4) To analyse how a broad range of theories reflect on the sovereign state; 5) To explore competing theories of International Relations; 6) To familiarise the students with the rich debate within the discipline and allow them to make up their own mind about their choice of theories.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay 1 (50%) and Coursework- Essay 2 (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 1ISP7C3 | Open
This module introduces students to the contemporary discourse and debates surrounding the meaning of international security. The end of the Cold War fundamentally altered the structure of the international system and precipitated the emergence of a new security agenda. The new systemic dynamics and reconfigured security agenda led many to question the dominant theoretical frameworks previously applied to international security and new security discourses such as human security and critical security studies have emerged to challenge established security theory. This module will examine the key tenets of the new theoretical frameworks and critically analyze their contribution to our understanding of security.


Module Aims:
1) To ensure that students acquire knowledge and understanding of security and use the concepts and approaches of theories of international security to critically analyse and interpret dominant security issues; 2) To provide an understanding of the development of the concept of international security in the post-ColdWar era; 3)To examine the changing focus of security concerns away from a narrow preoccupation with state security to human security; 4) To analyse the post-positivist perspective on security and especially the rise of critical security studies; 5) To assess how international security frameworks have been reshaped since the end of the Cold War; 6) To understand and critique the process of securitization; 7) To provide students with the ability to
critically analyse and evaluate these developments and situate them in the broader historical context
and their relationship with broader themes in international relations


Assessment: Coursework- Book Review (30%) and Coursework- Essay (4000 words) (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 7PIRS003W | Open
This module focuses on post-ColdWar United States foreign and national security policies and processes. Premised on the notion that policy determines politics and vice versa, the module exposes students to competing interpretations of both. Did the end of the ColdWar and 9/11, respectively, mark new eras or simply the extension of the US-sponsored post-WorldWar II liberal order? The module shows that many of the answers to these and other questions are rooted in US domestic politics as much as in America's strategic and global interests.


Module Aims:
1) To provide knowledge and understanding of competing explanations and interpretations of the substance, structure, and processes of foreign and security policy-making in the United States after the ColdWar and 9/11; 2) To use the concepts, approaches and methods of foreign policy analysis to develop a critical understanding of the contested nature and the problematic character of post-Cold War and post 9/11 US foreign and national security; 3)To use the concepts, approaches and methods of empirical political theory and analysis to develop a critical understanding of the contested nature and the problematic character of post-ColdWar US foreign and national security policymaking processes; and, specifically, to foster an understanding of competing interpretations of the roles played by the president, the Congress, the executive establishment, public opinion and interest groups, and American political culture in the making of contemporary American foreign policy; 4) To
encourage students to relate the advanced academic study of post-ColdWar US foreign and national security policy and related policymaking processes to questions of public concern.)


Assessment: Coursework- Structure questions (40%) and Examination- closed book- Medical
Genetics (60%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 7PIRS006W | Open
This module aims to provide a rounded understanding of key theories that inform thinking about development, especially since the ColdWar, and an understanding of some of the most significant policy debates in international development today.


Module Aims:
1) To provide a framework of ideas within which to understand current debates about development theories; 2) To provide a comprehensive understanding of major problems and policy debates within the field of development; 3) To examine the application of major policies on developing countries; 4) To critically assess the factors and processes promoting development; 5) To develop students’ critical understanding of the social, political and economic impact of globalisation and liberalisation on the developing economies; and 6) To consider the changing relations between the state and civil society in the developing world, and its implications for development practice.


Assessment: Coursework- Presentation (25%), Coursework- Proposal (25%) and Coursework- Individual Essay (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 7PIRS010W | Open
The module will prepare students to recognize and analyze the global political landscape changing with the predicted rise of non-Western states as great powers. The main focus will be on the domestic and international politics of China and India and the impact their rise has on the developed and developing countries.


Module Aims:
1) To explore empirical examples of global change, characterized by the predicted rise of non- Western states - China and India; 2) To develop a scholarly and critical understanding of the emerging great powers; 3) To train students to recognize, understand and deal with the changes in
the global political landscape; 4) To introduce students to both dominant and non-eurocentric views of global politics; 5) To study the significance and features of the rise of China and India in tandem (not in isolation).


Assessment: Coursework- Presentation and Country Report (1000 words) (30%) and Essay (4000words) (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 7PIRS012W | Open
The module sets out to explore the EU as a polity and as a system of governance. It offers a practice- led survey of governance issues in the EU, informed by relevant theoretical approaches. It covers the legal framework of the EU and the roles of member-state and institutional actors in its decision- making processes; questions of institutional efficiency, accountability and the wider legitimacy of the EU; and characterisations of the EU as a polity and as a global actor.


Module Aims:
1) To develop knowledge and understanding of the EU as a polity and as a global actor; 2) To evaluate critically the handling of governance within a multilevel EU (supranational, national and subnational); 3) To examine current debates relating to EU governance and legitimacy; and 4) To apply relevant theoretical approaches to contemporary issues of EU governance.


Assessment: Coursework- Role Position Paper (30%) and Essay (3500 words) (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: SISP700 | Open
The module introduces students to current debates on Middle Eastern politics from a number of perspectives, with a focus on the role of Islam. Students will be introduced to a variety of theoretical approaches to studying the modern Middle East, to relevant perspectives in International Relations, to selected case studies and various contributions to the debate from inside and outside the Arab world. A multidisciplinary approach will be adopted, where students will be steered through the fields of comparative politics, Islamic and Middle Eastern studies, and social and political theory so that at the end they will have achieved, in addition to familiarity with key issues in modern Middle Eastern
politics, an appreciation of the theoretical perspectives being covered. In the process, students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the workings of the region and challenged to
assess the explanations given and provide their own explanations.


Module Aims:
1) To deepen critical understanding of modern Middle Eastern politics, current developments in the Arab world and available policy options for national and international actors; 2) To subject prevalent theoretical paradigms in international relations to critical scrutiny by testing their claims of universal applicability in areas where these paradigms appear to face difficulties; 3) To familiarize students at an advanced level, through the use of empirical information and the exploration of weekly case studies, with the historical development and current dilemmas of Middle Eastern states where democracy building continues to face serious obstacles, and where important debates are being conducted at several levels (within the communities involved, among academics and among international policy makers) on the relevance of democratic norms and practices to Arab communities;
4) To sharpen the understanding at an advanced level of political processes and ideological trends in the Arab world beyond the Euro-centric focus of contemporary political theory.


Assessment: Presentation- Class Presentation (20%) and Group Coursework (4000 word essay
(80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: SPIR700 | Open
The module introduces students to the theoretical frameworks and practices of the politics of global complexity, the debates that have been triggered, and the way that complexity understandings have developed, especially in the 1990s and 2000s. Emphasis is placed upon the conceptual frameworks deployed in understanding system effects on political, economic and social life and how these enable us to rethink governance, power and agency.While focusing on conceptual frameworks, this module also engages with how complexity is reflected in new approaches to policy, and external stakeholders will provide input to the module (for example, the Social Market Foundation, Demos, the New Local Government Network and the Foreign Policy Centre).


Module Aims:
1) To introduce students to the theoretical frameworks and practices of the politics of complexity, the debates they have triggered, and the way that complexity approaches have developed in the post- ColdWar era; 2) To consider the changing framework of discussions of democratic governance in relation to questions of who governs, how governance is legitimated, the processes of governance and the objects of governance; 3)To trace discussion of policy-making in relation to agency and the politics of complexity, in particular the changing understandings of agency with more diversified ranges of actors and more circulatory, asymmetric and flatter concepts of agency; 4) To consider some of the contexts in which understandings of political power are expressed within the framework of complexity; 5) To analyse resilience and adaptivity as responses to the problem of governing complexity; 6) To examine the changing nature and dynamics of democratic practices, and to facilitate the development of analytical skills that enable students to understand different democratic initiatives within a wider framework of complexity approaches.


Assessment: Coursework- Book Review (1500 words) (20%) and Coursework- Essay (3500 words) (80%)

Contact Hours: 75

Postgraduate: Social Sciences & Humanities

5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7BUSS010W | Open
This module is about running the organisation better, by exploiting internal and external information. Operations management is concerned with using human, material and financial resources, in order to deliver required products and services efficiently and effectively. The manager needs sound information to know about performance across the whole organisation; and needs facts and figures about suppliers, customers and the rest of the organisation's environment. This is needed in order to plan, control, manage operations and make decisions, based on facts, figures and knowledge. This module develops a critical understanding of the sources and application of such information from a managerial (not a technical) viewpoint, and examines specific issues of managing operations.
Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CLST012W | Open
This module offers a critical introduction to contemporary cultural studies through analysis of the major approaches underlying the interdisciplinary, cross-cultural study of politics and society. It is built around the key theorists in the field, and through their work examines the complex interactions of culture in relation to politics, economy and society.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay 1 (2500 words) (30%), Coursework- Essay 2 (2500 words) (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CLST014W | Open
Focusing on the period from the very end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 21st century, this module examines a range of cultural, literary, artistic and theoretical perspectives on sexuality, in order to investigate the complex relationship between sexuality and narrative.


Assessment - Coursework - Essay 5000 words (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CLST015W | Open
Using a range of theoretical, historical, literary, visual and other cultural texts, this module explores the idea of urban culture as it has developed since the mid-nineteenth century. Focusing, in particular, on the distinctive concept of the modern metropolis, the module considers a variety of different representations of the city and critically examines the divergent ways in which they understand the specificity of urban experience itself.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay 5000 words (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CLST016W | Open
Introduction to history and theory of visual culture. Philosophical and theoretical perspectives are used to explore vision as a social and cultural process, investigating the ways in which the meanings of the 'seen' are explored, constructed and contested in construction, display and discourse.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay (60%), Presentation- Presentation/Documentation (40%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CLST017W | Open
Introduction to the theoretical debates that have contributed to the field of visual. The politics of representation, the reproduction of images, audience reception, the male and female gaze and the discourse of the other. An examination of the ways that theories and objects constitute each other..


Assessment: Coursework- Essay (5000 words) (100%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CREW001W | Open
Pre-requisite: You must submit a portfolio of creative writing samples for academic approval. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
This module focuses on the craft of playwriting, with a particular emphasis on drama that exploits the possibilities of the urban environment. It provides an opportunity for the student to draft a dramatic work of 60-90 minutes, critique the work of experienced dramatists and develop a shared vocabulary of technical terminology. It will also introduce students to major new-writing opportunities in London and beyond.


Assessment: Coursework- Reflective Log (30%), Coursework- One-act Play (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CREW003W | Open
Pre-requisite: You must submit a portfolio of creative writing samples for academic approval. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
Digital London explores the ways in which writers can make use of digital technologies to re-imagine the city. The module considers examples of creative practice that exploits tools such as apps, social media, GPA and virtual reality in the creation of, for example, digital literature, creative guiding, game- playing theatre, digital installations, and site-specific installations within the urban environment.


Assessment: Coursework- Project Presentation 30%), Coursework-Written Proposal (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CREW004W | Open
Pre-requisite: You must submit a portfolio of creative writing samples for academic approval. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
This module focuses on developing your use of poetic language through a combination of short exercises, close reading of poetry and prose poetry and critiques of your own.


Assessment: Coursework- Reflective Log (30%), Coursework- Portfolio (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7CREW006W | Open
Pre-requisite: You must submit a portfolio of creative writing samples for academic approval. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element
This module focuses on developing your skills at writing prose fiction inspired by the city through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, as you are challenged to raise your own prose writing to professional level.


Assessment: Coursework- Reflective Log (30%), Coursework- Portfolio (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7ECON010W | Open
The module will use microeconomic theory to analyse public policy issues. Firstly, it will critically analyse how models of individual choice can highlight policy analysis. Secondly, the module will discuss policy aspects of production and supply decisions. Finally, the module will investigate sources of market failure and institutional choices. We will also analyse competition policy in different countries.


Assessment - Coursework - Critical Review (30%) and Examination - closed book - Microeconomic Analysis and Policy (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7ELIT007W | Open
An independent module, it is also designed to provide preparatory discussion of topics in optional modules. It is organised around the question of subjects and subjectivities, and asks questions about texts and critical readings of them via questions of identity and selfhood.


Assessment:Coursework- Case Study (1500 words) (20%), Coursework- Essay (3000 words) (80%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7ENGL001W | Open
Theories of genre and discourse analysis; audience design, purpose and style; rhetoric and persuasion; text-types, text structures, grammatical and lexical features typical of texts drawn.


Assessment:Coursework- Text Analysis (30%), Coursework- Project (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7ENGL004W | Open
This module explores the interaction between the English language and other languages throughout the world, examining such varied but closely interrelated topics as world varieties of English, creole linguistics, multilingualism, intercultural pragmatics, and London English.


Assessment: Coursework- Project (3000 words) (30%), Coursework- Final Essay (5000 words)
(70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7ENGL005W | Open
Introduces the study of language as a means of communication in its social context, moving progressively from the individual to the speech community and nation/state to the worldwide networks of present-day human communication.


Assessment:Coursework- Data collection (30%), Coursework- Essay (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7FNCE015W | Open
The module evaluates the role and function of domestic and global banks, their structure and operations, together with a thorough examination of the risks that banks are exposed to, and the various ways to manage them.


Assessment - Coursework (30%) and Examination-closed-book—Global Banking (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7FNCE015W. | Open
The module examines the principles and practice of insurance and the operation of insurance companies in the life and non-life markets. It provides a solid understanding of all aspects of the nature and role of insurance, from basic principles through to industry practice.


Assessment - Coursework (30%) and Examination-closed-book (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7HURM005W | Open
Provides students with opportunities to critically analyse and reflect upon approaches in human resource management and helps them to understand the strategic contribution of these in determining success of organisations. The module particularly focuses on the vital role played by line managers in enabling people to add value and achieve sustained level of superior performance.


Assessment - Coursework (50%) and Examination-closed book- Human Resource Management (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7HURM012W | Open
This module explores the research evidence on effective approaches to human resource (HR) practice and the implications for organisational success. It also examines the theory and practice of leadership and management and provides a foundation for specialist modules in human resource management (HRM) and human resource development (HRD).


Assessment - Presentation - Group Presentation (25%) and Examination-closed-book- Employee Relations (75%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7PJMN005W | Open
This module will examine the importance of the project in the modern organisation with particular reference to managing projects. The key role of the project manager in orchestrating the project to successful completion will be emphasised, including the management of the following: planning, people, resources, delivery of the project, documentation, quality and change. Students will get a solid grounding in the theory and practice of project management using best practice methodologies (e.g. PRINCE2), based on the prevailing project management bodies of knowledge and will work on realistic case studies using a range of tools and project management computer software.


Assessment - Coursework - Case Study Exercise (Individual) (50%), Presentation (Group Work) (20%) and Coursework- Project Management Report (Group Work) (30%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7TESL001W | Open
The module examines current practice and developments in language learning and teaching, including communicative competence. A range of topical issues in language learning and teaching will be covered.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay 1 (30%), Coursework- Essay 2 (70%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7TESL003W | Open
This module introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in the description and analysis of language with specific reference to English language teaching. The module also introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in language learning with specific reference to second language acquisition and the implications of these concepts for the language teacher. The module is divided into two units: the first on language description and analysis; the second on language learning.


Coursework- Essay 1 (Unit One) (50%), Coursework- Essay 2 (Unit Two) (50%)

Contact Hours: 75
5.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 7TESL010W | Open
The module examines a wide range of theorists who have written on intercultural communication; it also challenges students to apply this theory critically to their own intercultural behaviour in personal and professional contexts.


Assessment: Coursework- Essay 1 (30%), Coursework- Essay 2 (70%)

Contact Hours: 75

Courses & Registration
Westminster courses run Monday – Friday. Students complete their course selection during the SAI application process by selecting their primary course choices as well as a required minimum 4 alternate courses. Students are tentatively placed in their primary courses pending the release of the semester timetable. Course schedules are confirmed after a personal registration appointment during the Westminster orientation week.


Pre-Departure Calendar
April 1 2017 Priority Enrollment Deadline
Students requiring specific or popular courses should enroll by this deadline for priority registration.
May 1 2017
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
May 1 2017
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
June 15 2017
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
July 1 2017
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
July 1 2017
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
August 1 2017
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
September 15 2017
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into any London airport, most common: Heathrow (LHR) or Gatwick (LGW). Airport pick-up is provided between 10am and 6pm and students are transferred to SAI housing. Apartment check-in begins at 2pm.
September 16 2017
SAI Orientation & Welcome Dinner
Mandatory SAI orientation introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture. Following orientation, students are welcomed with a great meal!
September 18 – 22 2017
Westminster Orientation & Registration
Westminster conducts 1 week of orientation and registration days as well as student activities. Students will finalize their courses during their individual registration appointment.
September 25 2017
Classes Begin
December 15 2017
Classes End
December 16 2017
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$19,200
Optional / Additional Fees:
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$5,095
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Please note: students from some affiliate universities have different payment arrangements that may require students to pay different deposits to SAI and some fees directly to the affiliate university instead of SAI. Please contact your study abroad office or the SAI business department for further details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from London
$900 $1,200
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
$300 $500
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$500 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $250 / month $350 / month
Transportation within London
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $250 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • Staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • Orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI weekend excursion
  • Frequent cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Event
Students are welcomed to their new city over a delicious dinner to mingle and get to know each other.

London Walking Tour
Students visit the Western part of the city accompanied by one of the finest local guides. The tour covers major sights such as Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Trafalgar Square, but also takes students through quaint back streets to experience the true spirit of London.

Pub History Tour
Through old alleyways and amongst other famous sights of the city, students explore 2,000 years of London’s best pubs and inns, tabernas, alehouses and coaching inns frequented by famous poets and writers such as Oscar Wilde and Charles Dickens.

An Evening in London’s West End
London’s West End is the world’s premier home of English language theatre—a fact that even the most avid Broadway addict will (quietly and begrudgingly) admit. Students get to enjoy a top rated West End musical or play to experience what all the hype is about.

Weekend Trip to Bath, Somerset and Stonehenge
Students enjoy a weekend trip that begins in Bath with a traditional English pub lunch, followed by guided tours of the Fashion Museum and the Roman Baths. Students also take a whirlwind tour of some of the most famous historical sites in Wiltshire, including Lacock village, Castle Combe, the Avebury Stone Circles, and of course, Stonehenge.

Thanksgiving Dinner
Students spend an evening together with a traditional American Thanksgiving Dinner at one of London’s top American restaurants. The evening provides delicious food and great company, for a little home comfort.

Farewell Event
Students celebrate the end of a great term and say their goodbyes over a pint!

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient, clean, and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (upgrade to private bedroom available). Apartments are within a 30 minute walk/tube ride of all London campuses. Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless internet. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Alternate Housing: Independent
Students seeking independent housing can do so, for a reduction in the SAI program fee. Please contact SAI for details.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 4 months after planned departure from the UK.

Student Visas
European Union citizens attending any SAI London school for an academic term do not require a student visa. United States citizens attending any London school for one academic term (6 months or less) do not require a student visa prior to arrival. However, students participating in an internship program in London require a Tier 4 Student Visa. All others should check with the British Embassy to determine if a visa is required and the process for obtaining one.

Our Student Visa Office is available to assist students requiring a visa; SAI provides student visa consulting for all our students at no cost.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.