University of Westminster
Spring Semester Elective 2018
12 – 16 credits

Study abroad students in Westminster’s semester program can choose from a wide range of coursework, studying alongside the degree seeking population. Students select three or four 4-credit elective courses from the semester schedule, for a total of 12 - 16 credits. The 12 credit program has an internship option while the 16 credit program requires students to take a course offered only to study abroad students.


Application Deadline
October 15, 2017 (Sept 15 Priority Enrollment)
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
One letter of recommendation
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)

Highlights

  • Academic internship placements
  • Various subject areas available
  • Courses are taken at one or more of the four London Westminster campuses: Cavendish, Marylebone, Regent, or Harrow

Program Dates
January 12, 2018 – May 26, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Sophomore (2nd year) or above

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.7 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit IELTS: 6 + with at least a 5.5 in each skill area.



Architecture and the Built Environment
Business
Electronics & Computer Science
English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies
Law Studies
Life Sciences
Media, Arts and Design
Politics and International Relations
Science and Technology
Social and Historical Studies
Social Sciences and Humanities
Study Abroad

Architecture and the Built Environment

4.0 Credits
Interior Architecture | Course #: 5ARCH007 | Section: 2 | Open
In this module students are required to study a specified interior through the medium of film. Working in crews that include a director, editor and camera operator you will develop a film proposal through storyboard, text and drawing. This proposal will then be shot on location in your selected interior and edited into a short film that will be presented to the group. You are also required to produce a working journal.


Assessment: Film Presentation (70%) Journal (30%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Interior Architecture | Course #: 5ARCH008W | Section: 2 | Open
This module offers students the opportunity to study in detail how temporary and permanent exhibitions are designed and curated. It primarily covers the re-evaluation of existing interior spaces, space planning and the analysis and thematic organisation of collections, together with the process of researching and editing content. Specialist workshops deal with the creative interpretation of specific design briefs and the articulation of creative design responses. The Module also considers the inter-relatedness of exhibition design, graphics and other promotional material.


Assessment: Journal (100%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 4BUIL001W | Section: 2 | Open
The module uses domestic building construction as the context to examine the performance requirements, technology and processes associated with buildings and their environmental services, including sustainability and energy conservation issues.


Assessment: Portfolio Project (75%) and Examination (25%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 4BUIL001W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores economics and accounting. The module aims to apply aspects of economic and accounting theory. It will provide a critical overview which will enable students to reason and argue using economic and accounting theory and principles. They will understand the context in which the property market exists and will be aware of exogenous factors impacting on property and the consequences of changes in the property market on the economy. The module will introduce students to the discipline of accounting the financial statements and their individual components. It will provide students with a clear understanding of the basic accounting principles and concepts.


Assessment: In-class Test (50%); Coursework (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 5PLAN003W | Section: 2 | Open
The module outlines the development process and theories of urban regeneration in the context of the global city. It considers the relationships between property-led and mixed communities in regeneration and the changing nature of urban regeneration in London and the debates surrounding best practice in the city using case studies and site visits. The module uses concepts from a range of academic disciplines to think about urban regeneration in London and in a global context.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (50%); Coursework 2 (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 5PROP002W | Section: 2 | Open
This module allows the students to understand both the law and practice concerning residential property. It explains the Law on ownership and occupation and covers the main residential tenancy agreements for both Private and Public residences. The module develops a practical and theoretical understanding of the legal framework, techniques and processes involved in the process of residential marketing sales and lettings.


Assessment: Coursework (50%); Project (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 5PROP002W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores modern business management principles as a means to analyse and consider the property profession as a whole. The module introduces and develops practical business skills.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (40%); Coursework 2 (40%); Coursework 3 (20%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 5PROP003W | Section: 2 | Open
Focusing on an integrated project portfolio based on a real property, students are able to develop a practical and theoretical understanding of the legal framework, participants, parameters, techniques and processes involved in the process of residential property survey and development. The module will follow the residential development process (based on a selected building) through survey and conversion.


Assessment: Integrated project portfolio (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 5URDE001W | Section: 2 | Open
This module examines the key stages in the development process and considers the role of different stakeholders. It investigates the operation of property markets and the interaction of the public and private sectors in shaping development in different contexts. It also introduces the techniques used for the financial appraisal of development projects.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (10%); Coursework 2 (40%); Coursework 3 (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Property and Contruction | Course #: 6PROP003W | Section: 2 | Open
The module will make students appreciate and understand the property and planning law and practice of countries other than UK. It involves the study and analysis of European legal systems and their application to local property markets, and case studies of international planning processes and procedures and comparative international planning and environmental law.


Assessment: Group coursework (50%); Individual essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 4TOUR004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module presents a dynamic overview of current trends and issues in the tourism sector. The programme will be based around current tourism issues and topics and aims to provide students with a deeper understanding of the background, nature and implications of these. Teaching and learning sessions will focus on discrete topics that highlight the changing nature of tourism and its industries such as the emergence of new business models, destinations and markets, and on external factors that influence the tourism industry such as climate change and world or political events. It is a sociological module, which uses examples from around the world.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 4TOUR006W | Section: 2 | Open
Hospitality is integral to the delivery of tourism and event services. Understanding the landscape and operations and related issues of this very large sector is vital. The module will cover the various aspects of the hospitality industry, which includes the accommodation and catering sub-sectors. The module will also explore management issues, price and revenue management as well as the structure of the sector and the regulations pertaining to it.


Assessment: Team Work (50%) ; Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 4TOUR007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores economic and property development. It outlines the working of the market to allocate resources and considers the rationale for market intervention. It considers property development and the implications for the tourism industry. It introduces property market data analysis which informs the decision to develop and explains the development process. It introduces the main methods of property valuation to develop a basic understanding of how property values can be enhanced, maintained and improved


Assessment: Essay (30%) ; Coursework (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 5TOUR004W | Section: 2 | Open
For many nations both sport and tourism are significant economic sectors and play important roles in society. This module examines the characteristics of sports tourism, identifying how the motivations of sports tourists shape participation and behaviours. It also examines supply characteristics, looking at local, national and global sporting events, the intermediaries and agents who influence the design of sporting products, and the development of sports tourism destinations.


Assessment: Essay (70%) ; Coursework (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 5TOUR005W | Section: 2 | Open
The module examines the nature of demand for airline services. It evaluates the traditional role of regulation and the implications of deregulation. Economic, commercial and operational characteristics of the industry are explained and the development of airline alliances/mergers, as well as the low cost and charter sector, is assessed. Current marketing trends are appraised. The broader environmental implications of industry growth are discussed.


Assessment: Coursework (20%) ; Report (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 6EVMN004W | Section: 2 | Cancelled
This module examines the relationship between mega-events and urban regeneration. The module examines the ways these events have been used as regeneration tools and explores ways that they could be used more effectively in the future. Inevitably, given the subject matter, the politics and rhetoric associated with mega-events are addressed too. Global mega-events are the main focus: the Olympic Games, The FIFA World Cup as well as World Expos.


Assessment: Presentation (30%) ; Exam (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Tourism | Course #: 6TOUR004W | Section: 2 | Open
The module explores the role of airports within the air transport system. It considers the different forms of airport ownership and management and investigates commercialisation, privatisation and globalization developments.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) and Examination (50%)

Contact Hours: 60

Business

4.0 Credits
Accounting Finance and Governance | Course #: 6ACCN001W | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides a systematic understanding and appreciation of the principles and practices underlying global financial accounting and the key accounting issues faced by multinational companies. The diversity in global financial accounting will be discussed and the arguments for the international accounting standards convergence project critically evaluated. Accounting issues related to foreign currency transactions and translation, business combinations, segment reporting, transfer pricing and wider corporate governance, faced by multinational companies will be discussed. In addition, current developments in international accounting will be examined. An appreciation of the practical application of the theory, knowledge and understanding gained, will be made through reference to industry cases. Learning activities include directed lectures, seminars and workshops. The workshops and seminars will be used to engage students in debate and use of sources from real-life companies and contemporary events to illustrate international financial accounting in practice.


Assessment: Group Coursework (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 4ACCN001W. | Section: 2 | Open
The module provides fundamental accounting and financial knowledge and essential skills for any business manager. It focuses on the purpose and relevance of accounting in business management and the use of accounting and finance techniques, to enable an analysis of business performance in small and large companies. It introduces students to: financial resources management and the role of capital markets.


Assessment: In-class Test (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 5ACCN001W | Section: 2 | Open
The module aims to introduce the major areas of employment regulation including those relating to recruitment, the contract of employment through to redundancy and dismissal. The module is intended to provide an overview of the employment relationship, rather than to focus in detail on the operation of specific employment laws. It will be extremely valuable both to employees and potential managers in understanding the importance of the legal context of the employment relationship and its contribution to a successful business both in local and international jurisdictions.


Assessment: Coursework (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 5BUCL002W | Section: 2 | Open
The module will examine how various forms of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) allow parties to resolve conflicts separate from litigation proceedings within state run court systems, as well as provide students first-hand knowledge of the key issues, principles, rules, procedures and parties involved in ADR. In both the national and international business context, parties seek ADR as a preferable because of the speedier, more predictable and less costly results compared to litigation. ADR aspects will include inclusion of mediation, conciliation, expert determination and arbitration both within the International community and in the UK.


Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 5BUCL003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module focusses on those aspects of business law that are relevant to business operations, including contract, tort, company and employment law.


Assessment: Exam (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 5FNCE005W | Section: 2 | Open
The module introduces and develops students understanding of key concepts and features of corporate governance. Students develop an understanding of the theories of corporate governance and get comprehensive knowledge of the UK system of corporate governance and its development. The students also learn the guidelines and regulations which corporation have to follow in relation to corporate governance.


Assessment: In-class Test (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6ACCN008W | Section: 2 | Open
This module is intended to develop the student’s ability to critically appraise corporate treasury management decisions using an appreciation of the relevant theories of financial management and strategy. The module will enable the students to evaluate long-term and short-term financing decisions, with an emphasis on expansion and market maintenance strategies, as well as providing them with an understanding of the importance of working capital management. The module will demonstrate how decisions are made regarding proper pricing of assets in merger and acquisition situations and the appropriateness of the various methods of valuing securities. The module also considers the effects of corporate reorganisation and capital reconstruction schemes.


Assessment: In-class Test (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6BUCL003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module enables the student to understand the working of the European Union, and the impact of European Union law upon business. The role of EU institutions and the effect of EU law upon the legal systems of member states are considered. The importance of the single market policies relating to goods, persons, and services is explored. The module also covers the impact of EU social policy (especially sex discrimination) and EU competition policy upon business activity.


Assessment: Essay (1000 words) (25%) ; Essay (3000 words) (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6BUCL004W | Section: 2 | Open
The module will examine legal and regulatory controls on the marketing of goods and services. Consideration will be given to issues arising from the application of consumer legislation and policy making as they apply to marketing problems within the organisation. The module seeks to build on the students knowledge of contract and tort law and consider current legislation including the Consumer Protection Act 1987, Consumer Rights Bill 2014 and cases dealing with consumer protection issues such as product liability, misrepresentation and unfair trading regulations. Module content includes civil and criminal law as related to business transactions, an appreciation of the institutional framework, voluntary and pressure groups and their impact on consumer protection and a general examination of proposals for enhancing consumer protection.


Assessment: Essay (1000 words) (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6BUCL005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module is especially useful for those students who will be seeking exemptions in Company Law from UK professional bodies, but is also relevant for anyone who wishes to learn about the nature, function and place of company law in business. The module is concerned with the significance of the inter-relationship between shareholders, company directors, creditors, customers and members of the public and the role of the government and other institutions in company law.


Assessment: Essay (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6FNCE001W | Section: 2 | Open
The module will provide students with a broad knowledge of the structures and the different functions of banking institutions in both the home and international markets. The module gives emphasize to the role of banks in the economy, banking regulation, bank performance, management of bank risk.


Assessment: Coursework (30%) and Examination (70%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6FNCE003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will provide students with a wide-ranging knowledge of financial markets and financial institutions. It focuses on issues related to the role of a financial system, the functions of different types of financial institutions, and the understanding of financial products commonly traded in each financial market (including equity market, money market and bond market). These topics are addressed from a global perspective.


Assessment: Group Coursework (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6FNCE005W | Section: 2 | Open
The module introduces and develops students understanding of key features of international financial management. In markets which operate internationally, students develop an understanding of the choices of raising capital, investment, risk management, acquisition activity, restructuring and other aspects of financial policy. Students learn to analyse exchange rates, differences in tax rules, country risk factors and variations in legal regimes.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Accounting, Finance & Governance | Course #: 6FNCE006W | Section: 2 | Open
Over the past three decades financial markets have undergone significant technological and regulatory changes that have made financial instruments and services more complex and sophisticated. Additionally, changes in demographics, politics and the economy, have shifted towards a consumer society, that places high value on possessions. Further, the moves from the welfare state towards liberalization and financial self-reliance have made the making of prudent personal financial decisions very challenging. It has thus become crucial for individuals to develop greater financial capabilities if they want to ensure a decent standard of living and achieve their life goals. The prime objective of this module is to equip students with the necessary knowledge and skill required for them to make sound and informed personal financial decisions as well as put them on the first step of developing a career as a personal financial planner.


Assessment: In-class Test (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 4BDIN001W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module introduces the nature and importance of information acquisition, presentation and preservation. Business computing/software and its practical applications in finding and selecting data and information will be explored. Understanding of information flows within organisations and management and operations functions and the systems needed to support these will be developed as will effective, secure and ethical business communications.


Assessment: Group Presentation (25%) ; In-class Test (25%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 4EBUS001W. | Section: 2 | Open
Online technology has altered how many industries operate in the modern business environment. One of the industries that has changed most is the entertainment industry, this module will explore how online technologies have effected this industry and what lessons can be learnt for other industries.


Assessment: Portfolio (50%) ; Report (2000 words) (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 4EBUS002W | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides an introduction to a range of topics associated with creating and managing the online presence of an organisation. By the end of this module students will be able to make multifaceted digital presence as well as designing, implementing and managing a website that is high quality, usable & accessible.


Assessment: Report (2000 words) (50%) ; Project (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 5BDIN001W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Dis-requisite: 5EBUS001W Digital Business
This module explores how to effectively manage the range of operations functions drawing from the traditional and digital perspectives. It considers the business process; the supply chain; systems integration; and the management of information, quality, demand, capacity and resources. It covers aspects of electronic and mobile services, commerce and business; innovation and design in products and services; and developments in technology and systems.


Assessment: Portfolio (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 5BDIN002W | Section: 2 | Open
Increasingly projects are being instigated by businesses and organisations in order to stay competitive and maintain standards. Innovation, development and marketing of new products and services involve project management. The module is intended for second year students interested in applying the theoretical, practical and technical skills of project management in a variety of business contexts.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 5BDIN003W | Section: 2 | Open
The purpose of the module is to provide students with a clear understanding of all aspects involved in designing, developing and maintaining a web-enabled business. The module builds a comprehensive insight of key strategic considerations in web design and the necessity of aligning web presence with business objectives and organisational strategy.


Assessment: Coursework (25%) ; End of Module Assessment (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 6BDIN001W | Section: 2 | Open
Sustainable Business addresses environmental, social justice and economic sustainability of organisations, drawing on different disciplinary areas to develop understanding of sustainability in private, public and third sector organisations. The module advances understanding of the range of processes within and between organisations that facilitate sustainable practices and prepares students for professional life as meaningful agents for change, able to identify and implement improvements in sustainability practice in organisations.


Assessment: Coursework (25%); In-class Test (25%); Portfolio (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 6BDIN003W | Section: 2 | Open
Digital Analytics is a developing area within many organisations, where there is a need to understand and analyse the online/offline behaviour of consumers and data generated from different business processes. This module will explore both Business Intelligence (BI) and web analytics (WA).


Assessment: Practical Coursework (50%) ; End of Module Assessment (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: 6BDIN004W | Section: 2 | Open
The purpose of the module is to investigate the role of social media platforms in an organisational context and explore how their adoption fits into operations and supports business objectives. The module will enable students to tailor social media to given business needs and develop strategies for successfully using social platforms in proactive and reactive environments.


Assessment: End of Module Assessment (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Information Management and Operations | Course #: BBIM602 | Section: 2 | Open
This module will explore the exciting differences between traditional business strategy and the strategies required to gain the most from new technologies, enterprise management and eBusiness/eCommerce solutions. The module will explore and integrate the traditional and enterprise strategies together, enabling students to evaluate and make better use of strategies within a modern organization. This module will explore models for eMarketing Strategy, eProcurement strategies, Customer relationship management, Information strategies and ecommerce strategies.


Assessment: Coursework (60%) and Examination (40%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 4BUSS003W | Section: 2 | Open
Sport is a high profile global business, which excites and entertains, builds allegiances and generates intense rivalries. As such it provides the perfect medium to explore important business concepts of relevance for private, public and not-for-profit organisations. The module looks at concepts such as of value and price in sport, the market for (and marketing of) sports products and services, issues of CSR and ethics in sport and the role of government regulations.


Assessment: Group Presentation - Video and Script (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 5BUSS001W | Section: 2 | Open
This module has a practical focus. Students will learn about the nature of business decision making, including the key role of information, risk and complexity, and the internal and the external economic and financial environment within which these decisions are made. Emphasis is placed on the students ability to identify, select and use appropriate data, in a range of formats, to analyse and solve a range of business problems. Learning activities include directed lecture, seminar and computer-lab sessions and scenario-based enquiry-led workshops, within which students will operate as decision teams.


Assessment: Group Coursework (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 5ECON004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisite: 4ECON003W - Quantitative Economic Analysis or equivalent
The module will provide an overview of probability theory and the theory of statistical inference, and will develop a range of applications derived from this theoretical framework. A particular emphasis will be placed on the development of the single equation regression model, emphasising the applications of the model within a causal modelling context and the manner in which the model can be used for prediction/forecasting purposes.


Assessment: Project (2000 words) (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 5ECON005W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module is designed to provide an introduction to the flow of funds in the economy, the banking sector and to financial markets and systems, all of which are essential to the functioning of modern economies. Although the module is about financial systems in general, there will be frequent reference to contemporary issues and problems, and to their historical antecedents. The approach will incorporate a blend of published economic and financial data, and as far as possible, international comparisons.


Assessment: In-module Test (50%) ; Group Presentation (25%) ; Group Report (25%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 5ECON006W | Section: 2 | Open
Globalisation has created a constantly changing and interconnected international economic environment. This module draws on economic analysis to provide critical insights and analysis of the causes, consequences and solutions to a diverse range of topical global economic issues. These might include: managing international labour migration, tackling poverty and global inequality, mitigating against climate change, international trade disputes, global economic crises and the challenges of sustainable energy and development.


Assessment: Group Report (2000 words) (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 5ECON007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores the impact of the digital economy. Digital products are intensive in terms of their information content, profoundly affecting their production and consumption. The growing availability of Big Data creates scope for new competitive insights for companies. At a macroeconomic level, too, the growth of the internet and digital technology offers major opportunities for governments seeking to harness the potential of the new economy.


Assessment: Online Test (25%) ; Group Presentation (25%) ; Report - 2000 words (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 6ECON004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module focuses on the economic and social challenges and opportunities facing low and middle income countries as they strive to achieve sustained economic growth and development. It explores a range of contemporary development issues including the role of human capital, international trade, development finance, governance and political systems in facilitating economic development. Students will gain a thorough insight into a range of contemporary development challenges and an understanding of the theoretical debates and policy options open to development managers and other policy makers.


Assessment: In-Class Test (25%) ; Coursework (25%) ; Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 6ECON005W | Section: 2 | Open
A knowledge of international economics is key to an understanding of the rapidly changing global economy. This module provides the analytical framework through which to explore the economics of international trade, investment and finance. Students will gain understanding of international specialisation, the role of key global institutions, the implications of protection for economic welfare, and the effect of various macroeconomic policies on international markets.


Assessment: Report - 2000 words (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics and Quantitative Methods | Course #: 6ECON006W | Section: 2 | Open
The recent crisis in financial markets has exposed serious flaws in management forecasting methods, most notably the failure to anticipate and deal with the consequences of economic collapse. This quantitative module provides an insight into to the major methods of forecasting. In addition to considering the theoretical aspects of the methods, students will gain practical experience of applying some of the most commonly used procedures to real life data. This will be achieved by using on line data such as that offered by the Bloomberg Financial Markets Suite. Software will be used for data analysis.


Assessment: Report - 2000 words (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics & Quantitative Methods | Course #: 4BUSS001W. | Section: 2 | Open
The module offers students the opportunity to learn about business organisations, their purposes, structures and governance in a global context. At the same time students will study the cultural differences within and between business organisations and the ethical constraints facing these organisations. As part of the process of learning about 7 business organisations students will learn effective group and leadership skills and develop the skills necessary to structure a coherent report with conclusions linked to evidence.


Assessment: Coursework (4 x 25%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 4HURM005W. | Section: 2 | Open
The course is designed as an introduction to the subject of Organisational Behaviour, which helps people in organisations to have a better understanding of factors that influence behaviour. It aims to improve self-understanding and also understanding of the behaviour of other people. The module draws on insights and research from Organisational Behaviour (specifically from the Psychological and Sociological parts of Organisational Behaviour) and more widely from the social sciences to explore a number of topics, enabling us to be more reliable and rigorous than using only œcommon sense understandings of behaviour. The module highlights some areas of difference and diversity that we are likely to encounter in many contemporary organisations.


Assessment: Reflective Writing (25%) ; Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 4HURM005W. | Section: 1 | Open
The course is designed as an introduction to the subject of Organisational Behaviour, which helps people in organisations to have a better understanding of factors that influence behaviour. It aims to improve self-understanding and also understanding of the behaviour of other people. The module draws on insights and research from Organisational Behaviour (specifically from the Psychological and Sociological parts of Organisational Behaviour) and more widely from the social sciences to explore a number of topics, enabling us to be more reliable and rigorous than using only œcommon sense understandings of behaviour. The module highlights some areas of difference and diversity that we are likely to encounter in many contemporary organisations.


Assessment: Reflective Writing (25%) ; Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 4HURM007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module is intended to prepare students for supervisory and managerial roles and, as such, deals with the core skills involved in management. These include delegation, managerial & leadership styles, motivation; chairing meetings, workplace counselling, staff development, identifying and managing conflict and negotiating skills. The module aims to help students identify how people become managers, what the role of the manager is and how to maximise their effectiveness in that role. Real-life examples are offered throughout, with the variations in styles of management and leadership required by different organisations and different cultures taken into consideration.


Assessment: Report - 2000 words (50%) ; In-class Test (Case Study) (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5BUSS005X | Section: 2 | Open
Students undertake unpaid part-time work of their choice (internship), which can be at any level equivalent to two- three days per week over the course of the 12-week long module. This can be done in the day time and/or evenings and weekends. Employers are expected to support students in completing their weekly timesheets and in the development of skills and competencies required by the role, and by providing a written reference outlining their work contribution. Alongside the internship, study will comply with UKBA regulations with the undertaking of a full time course of study comprised of 60 UK credits per semester. The Professional and Personal Skills Development module along with the internship provide 20 UK credits and three hours of supervised teaching per week. Students will keep a weekly reflective log of events. The Professional Experience in a Business Context module provides a structured learning environment drawing from the internship employment. It covers Employment Studies (eg comparative analysis of UK and USA graduate employment), Organisation Studies (eg organisation structure, training, and appraisal) and skills development (eg presentation, interview and key skills). It requires interns to reflect on their experiences, development and learning.
The teaching materials will be delivered in the tutorials and will be stored in a portfolio in which students record their thoughts, feelings and reflections and develop items for assessment. At the same time students further prepare for graduate employment through the development of an understanding of their own aspirations and career plan needs in a Personal Development Plan (PDP). They also develop four key skills relevant to the module and reflect on their development in these using the Skills Tracker software tool stored on the university server. The students prepare a CV and give a presentation of what they have learnt comparing their experiences of working in the UK with working practices in their home countries and what they now can offer an employer.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5HURM005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores different psychological theories and their application in organisational settings. The module provides the student with an appreciation of the psychological study of work organisations and work behaviour in a contemporary HR business context. The sessions will critically explore the application of contemporary work and organisational psychology to HR business issues and function.


Assessment: Essay (25%) ; Case Study Report - 3000 words (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5HURM006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Disrequesite: 5HURM008W Management and Leading People
The module is proposed to be structured into two parts. Part 1 involves reviewing theories and approaches related to what is the nature of leadership and management, and what are the factors that influence the effectiveness of the leadership and management process. Part 2 involves helping students to develop the core skills and understanding needed to deal with management responsibilities and develop as leaders. This includes how to co-ordinate the activities of people and guiding their efforts towards the goals and objectives of the organisation.


Assessment: Group Presentation (25%) ; Essay - 3000 words (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5HURM007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module seeks to develop students understanding of the nature of work in contemporary society and, in particular, how it is experienced from the perspective of the worker or employee. This includes consideration of the divergent interests and power differentials between the employer and the employed and the meaning and value that work has both to individuals, and to society as a whole.


Assessment: Essay - 3000 words (75%) ; In-class Test (25%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5HURM008W | Section: 2 | Open
The module is structured in two parts. Part 1 involves reviewing theories and approaches related to leadership and management and factors that influence the effectiveness of the leadership and management process. Part 2 involves helping students to develop core skills and understanding needed to deal with management responsibilities and develop as leaders.


Assessment: Group Coursework (25%) ; Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5HURM009W | Section: 2 | Open
Do businesses have any ethical responsibilities what might these be?This module considers the role of ethics in business in a market economy and marketised society, the implications for types of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Considers the ethical dilemmas thrown up by business operations and implications for suppliers, employees, consumers, wider society and the environment. Looks at corporate governance and role of governments, international & regional institutions. Looks at labour standards, consumer protection, corporate market behaviour, environmental problems.


Assessment: In-class Test (25%) ; Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5WSEL001W | Section: 2 | Open
This module focuses on the research and the development of interdisciplinary project work, for students from both art and science disciplines. Students undertaking this module learn by engaging others with their own expertise and collaborating with others outside of their discipline, in a process of research and experimentation. The results of these explorations will be shared with the group through visual, textual and/or oral presentation. Collaborative project work develops from a central theme, which changes each year – contact the module leader for details.
This module is great if you are interested in:
- Understanding the complex relationship between science and art in our changing world.
- Developing collaborative research projects.
- Engaging in dialogue and discussion about how science makes an impact on art and how art can make a difference to science.


Assessment: Research and Production Journal (70%); Critical Evaluation (30%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5WSEL004W | Section: 2 | Open
The future is both exciting and scary. The graduate of today is likely to be working for fifty years. Within this time period the industry in which you begin your career - and the wider world around you - will change beyond all recognition. This module will help you to develop the knowledge and skills you will need to build sustainable careers in a shifting, fast changing world. It will explore possible futures across a range of perspectives from architecture to politics, fashion to economics. Students will understand the basis for these predictions and will be given skills to enable them to consider how their place in the world will be impacted and what they should consider in order to help maintain a successful and fulfilling working life.


Assessment: Group presentation and portfolio (40%); Individual scenarios and reflective report (60%). *All transcripts are issued in UK credits.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 5WSEL017W | Section: 2 | Open
This module focuses on developing personal awareness and resilience for academic purposes and for professional life. From research it is known that Individual resilience is strongly associated with physical and psychological markers of stability, which helps to deal with adversity and stress during challenging life situations. Through the knowledge, strength and experience gained, from theory to practice, students will grow in understanding and capacity, not only of their own resilience and wellbeing, but also of others in the community. This in turn helps to develop working in diverse communities and to help create future ethical leaders.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (40%); Coursework 2 (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 6BUSS002W | Section: 2 | Open
This module is about critically exploring some of the most important similarities and differences in the context of management and organisation across different countries and regions of the world. It seeks to provide a broad conceptual framework to analyse such variety in view of the institutional -as opposed to cultural- context in which management and organisation take place. This comparative framework draws on the distinction between Liberal and Coordinated market economies - or Anglo-Saxon and Rhine models respectively including the US, UK and Canada on the one hand, and Germany, The Netherlands, Scandinavian countries and Japan on the other. The module aims to systematically analyse - and critically evaluate - main similarities and differences across selected countries and regions in terms of the nature of firms, national models of corporate governance; national systems of employment relations; national innovation systems; societal systems of production; and socio economic outcomes.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 6HURM004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will explore the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of psychological, psychometric and organisation-based assessments, and consider their practical use in employee assessment & selection, and organisation-wide interventions. Students will undergo assessments as a candidate; they will examine the role and responsibilities of HRM in overseeing the use of assessments; and learn how assessments should be administered and used following legal and ethical good practice guidelines.


Assessment: Reflective Essay - 1000 words (25%) ; Report - 3000 words (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 6HURM005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module draws on students’ lived experience of culture and the research on cultural differences. It provides a useful base for those finding themselves working in multicultural settings, and also for those managing in those settings, including in a HRM role. It stimulates reflection and discussions, leading to greater self-understanding of our own preferences and how some of these are in part culturally derived, alongside a greater understanding of other views.


Assessment: Essay - 1000 words (25%) ; Reflective Diary - 3000 words (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
HR Mgmt, Leadership & Profess. Development | Course #: 6HURM006W | Section: 2 | Open
This module focuses upon the theory and applied practice of coaching and mentoring. It covers the principles, theories, models and emerging trends from the discipline of psychology that contribute to the mainstream coaching of individuals and teams in a HR context. The content of the module focuses upon the core psychological approaches and their application when coaching individuals and teams within organizations.


Assessment: Case Study Report - 2000 words (50%) ; Portfolio - 2000 words (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Leadership and Development | Course #: 5WSEL002W | Section: 2 | Open
Campus - Marylebone

Coaching and mentoring developmental relationships can be found in all professions and constitute a valuable set of skills including reflexivity. Reflexivity can be utilized to empower, excite, enthuse and engage both others and self in the workplace. The module will introduce students from many disciplines to the reflective, transformative and empowering communication tools of coaching and mentoring in order to help develop personal and professional abilities and potential. This module will support students as they progress through the key transition phases that are part of their University experience. The elective module will support Level 5 students and provide valuable transferable skills that can be taken to Level 6 to help foster a global career advancement focus and future leadership capability. The module offers students the opportunity to undertake deep contemplation regarding their future professional working lives. Students who complete this module will be able to demonstrate advanced subject-specific knowledge and skills. It is important to note that students will not be fully qualified coaches and mentors as a result of completing the module. All seminar leaders/lecturers involved in the teaching of this module have completed University based training on coaching and mentoring.


Assessment: Group presentation and individual reflection (40%) ; Reflective portfolio (60%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Leadership and Development | Course #: 5WSEL005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will provide students with a sound knowledge and practical skills required for effective interpersonal communication in a variety of professional contexts. Students will be introduced to verbal and non -verbal communication models and skill sets, and will practice and develop a variety of transferable, interactive and dynamic communication styles- such as rapport building, written communication skills, individual and group, presentations and interviews. Throughout the module students will reflect on employability, career-related skills, and self-awareness.


Assessment: Reflective case study (50%); Work related group presentation (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Leadership and Development | Course #: 5WSEL006W | Section: 2 | Open
Cavendish Campus

The module aims to provide a fun and stimulating opportunity for students to address a fundamental aspect of themselves; their reasoning ability. Investigating an essential element of effective communication how to make sound arguments the module will enable you to develop your arguing skills in your own academic subject, understand how this relates to reasoning in general, and introduce you to the study of logic. The approach is very practical, arguing against each other and experimenting with different representations. This entails developing skills of analysis, experience in focusing on very precise distinctions in meaning, and communicating succinctly, soundly and honestly. By the end of the module you will be able to demonstrate your knowledge of basic concepts and notation in logic, evaluate a range of simple arguments, exercise judgement in selecting examples of reasoning from varied media, and argue against others in a group setting to an agreed level of performance.
This module is great if you are interested in:
- Learning how to use arguments effectively, informed principles of logic and reasoning.
- Showcasing to future employers that you can think deeply about a range of problems and use argument to deliver impact.
- Communicating your ideas succinctly, honestly and effectively.


Assessment: Individual Case Study (60%); End-of-year Exam (40%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Leadership and Development | Course #: 5WSEL007W | Section: 2 | Open
Cavendish/Regent/Harrow Campus

The module gives students the opportunity to identify and collaboratively address political, legal, social, cultural, health, economic or other issues or problems of their choice through the creation, development, production and dissemination of serious games. Drawing on students’ existing critical and creative skills, the module introduces students to the use of serious games in social and traditional entrepreneurship. Students will collaboratively create, develop, design and promote games to help address the identified issues and problems. In doing so, students will develop transferable knowledge of serious games design, development and application, as well as entrepreneurial and project management skills. The module achieves this by employing innovative forms of delivery that mimics the production process from inception of an idea to production and delivery to provide the students with an immersive authentic learning experience.
This module is great if you are interested in:
- Creatively exploring a social cause or business concept by creating an electronic game.
- Demonstrating to future employers that you can think laterally about a range of strategic issues and are able to apply different ways of thinking in solving problems.
- Are interested in using games to generate deep insight into social, political and business environments.


Assessment: Learning Portfolio (25%); Game Design and Production (50%); Critical Evaluation of Game Production Process (25%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 4MARK006W. | Section: 2 | Open
Creating and managing successful brands is a source of competitive advantage to modern organizations. This module provides students with the fundamental understanding of brands, brand positioning and brand portfolio management. It engages students by practical demonstration of the effective use of marketing and branding tools. At the heart of an effective brand strategy, is its seamless integration with the marketing mix. A successful brand plan does not only address how the brand will be communicated but also how it will be protected.


Assessment: Group Report (25%) ; Group Presentation (25%) ; Exam - Closed Book (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 5MARK006W | Section: 2 | Open
This module covers marketing channels, some major principles of retailing and issues of ethics and sustainability. The module studies the interaction of intermediaries through the channel with emphasis on their interaction and the interdependencies brought about through increasing reliance on technological interaction. Some of the issues driving retailing both in store and on-line are looked at from the retail management perspective examining the principles driving competitiveness in retail organisations in different retail sectors. The module also considers wider social, political, economic and environmental responsibilities of distributors and retailers (if any).


Assessment: Group Presentation (25%) ; Essay (25%) ; Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 6ENTP005W | Section: 2 | Open
To empower learners with the competencies (knowledge, values and skills) necessary to optimally utilise Entrepreneurship as a way to economic wealth and growth. Learners will be empowered with the necessary competencies such as knowledge, values and skills to be entrepreneurial at different of management in a corporate environment. Successful learners will be able to act as change agents, ensuring that business entities not only have the competitive edge through new products, service and processes, but are also more effective and efficient. Entrepreneurial companies will contribute to employee satisfaction and retention. Learners credited with this module will have the ability to develop their entrepreneurial skills, so that they have the potential to become efficient and effective employees and managers in a business environment.


Assessment: Presentation (25%) ; Report (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 6MARK003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores key theories to ensure success in the international market place. With an awareness of triggers of internationalisation and cultural and social issues, businesses can select the appropriate market strategies in order to achieve sustained growth, and formulate marketing plans accordingly.


Assessment: Report (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing and Business Strategy | Course #: 6MARK015W | Section: 2 | Open
An excellent module for anyone considering a career in Digital Marketing, or the wider marketing communications industry. It creates an opportunity for students to participate in appraising the on line presence of brands and to identify the underlying campaign strategies. You will carry out your own research, learn to reflect and give feedback to your peers and write succinctly - a critical skill required in industry.


Assessment: Online Portfolio (25%) ; Exam (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 4ENTP002W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will engage students in the more practical elements of innovation and enterprise activity, not just in terms of creating new businesses, but also in terms of entrepreneurship within the corporate environment. This module will prepare students for enterprise activity across a variety of contexts.


Assessment: Market Opportunity Report - 1000 words (25%) ; Business Feasibility Report - 2000 words (50%) ; Business Pitch (25%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 4MARK001W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides students with an introduction to marketing and its role in business and society. It gives students an overview of the principles underpinning marketing activities, and is both an introduction to the subject area. The module aims to introduce the key concepts of marketing, an understanding of consumer behaviour, and an evaluation and application of marketing tools in the context of contemporary major social and environmental issues.


Assessment: Group Presentation (25%) ; Report (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 4MARK005W. | Section: 2 | Open
This module is rich in theory from consumer studies, psychology and sociology explaining why consumers behave the way they do and how marketers can use this information. Both customer and organisational decision-making processes are explored.


Assessment: Group Presentation (50%) ; Exam - Closed Book (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 5ENTP005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module is an action based entrepreneurial practice in generating revenue for a chosen organization. The student is expected to fulfil the modules learning outcomes through the entrepreneurial project and written assessment. The student is expected to organise a revenue generation project with a team of five students which has to be approved by the module leader. This module provides a way for students to pursue enterprise and entrepreneurial skills through the process of entrepreneurial learning.


Assessment: Individual Log (25%) ; Project Action Report (25%) ; Individual Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 5MARK010W | Section: 2 | Open
The module is designed to build on contemporary marketing theory and to apply it in a sports context. The module examines strategic sports marketing planning within an appropriate framework. Students will look at the application of marketing concepts in sport, and in particular market segmentation and the roles of branding and sponsorship. They will be given the opportunity to reflect on the current and future impact of globalisation and commercialisation on the wider sports industry. The module will encourage students to apply concepts and criteria derived from good practice in other sectors to specific sporting applications and to develop their analytical and critical skills.


Assessment: Coursework (25%) ; Presentation (25%) ; Exam - Closed Book (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 5MARK012W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: 4MARK003W Principles of Marketing 1 OR 4MARK004W Principles of Marketing 2 or equivalent
Marketing research is the use of information to minimise risk in marketing decision making. This module takes students through the steps involved in determining the purpose, the population of interest, the procedures to use and how to present the results of a marketing research project, instructing them in the use of secondary and primary data sets qualitative and quantitative tools to apply them in different contexts. Students practice active learning, problem solving, and autonomy. The module provides marketing knowledge and transferable skills required for professional marketers.


Assessment: Individual Coursework (25%) ; Exam - Closed Book (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing & Business Strategy | Course #: 6MNST001W | Section: 2 | Open
Global Strategic Management integrates all the key concepts covered in previous years of study, drawing on and extending material from a variety of business disciplines. The ultimate aim is to equip students with a range of strategic and organisational skills, building on them to develop the ability of student to manage a business organisation successfully, with a clear view of the broader competitive environment of today’s turbulent economy.


Assessment: Group Presentation (25%) ; Individual Critical Review (25%) ; Individual Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Summer School | Course #: 4MARK006W | Section: 2 | Open
Creating and managing successful brands is a source of competitive advantage to modern organizations. This module provides students with the fundamental understanding of brands, brand positioning and brand portfolio management. It engages students by practical demonstration of the effective use of marketing and branding tools. At the heart of an effective brand strategy, is its seamless integration with the marketing mix. A successful brand plan does not only address how the brand will be communicated but also how it will be protected.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Summer School | Course #: 6BDIN005W. | Section: 2 | Open
The module is aimed at students interested in developing their project and programme management skills and knowledge. This module will provide an overview of the fundamentals of project management and will then explore challenges of strategic and international project/programme management.


Assessment: Report (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60

Electronics & Computer Science

4.0 Credits
Business Information Systems | Course #: 6MEST004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical – Portfolio required.
This module is to support you in launching yourself in the media industries, or other intended careers. You present and promote yourself and your practical work to potential employers, with this facilitated through an extensive programme of visiting professionals. Tasks include the production of a career plan and promotional visuals, which you show to relevant professionals for advice and feedback.


Assessment: Career Plan and Industry Feedback (50%); Promotional Materials and CV(s) (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Electronic, Networking & Communication Engineering | Course #: 5WSEL016W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will give students an appreciation of the issues involved in designing interactive products to support people. It is about problem solving and exploring possibilities of the ways people interact with technology. Students undertaking this module will learn by engaging with others in actively learn, discuss, challenge and apply ideas, investigate problems and propose/explore solutions through collaborative activities. Utilising a design thinking approach, this module is accessible to students of all backgrounds who are interested in exploring and transforming the intersection of human centred design and their own discipline.


Assessment: Research and production portfolio (60%); Critical evaluation (40%).

Contact Hours: 60

English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies

4.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: 6CREW003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Non-native English speakers must have IELTS 7.0 or equivalent for this module.
This module will explore the creative possibilities, structures, and conventions relevant to a specific genre (e.g. crime; romance; children’s fiction, graphic novels). Content will vary each year according to the genre selected by the department, and will be based on the specialisms of permanent staff and visiting practitioners. A detailed syllabus and reading list will be made available at the time of module choices.


Assessment: Short Essay (30%) ; Coursework (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: 6ELIT007W | Section: 2 | Open
The content of this module changes each year, allowing a detailed exploration of a particular current area or issue in literary studies, led by staff research expertise.


Assessment: Essay (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: 6ENGL003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module aims to introduce you to language and gender during spoken interaction; gender differences in pronunciation and grammar; mixed-sex conversations; same-sex talk; women and men in talking in work settings and theoretical debates.


Assessment: Practical Task with Reflection (30%) and Project (70%)

Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: 6ELIT003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Assessment: Coursework (30%) ; Essay (70%).
Through analysis of selected key texts in its history, this module traces the development of tragedy as a genre, from its origins in the Ancient Greek polis through to its revival in Renaissance England to its much- disputed crisis in modernity.


Assessment: Project (30%); Critical Summary (30%); Exam (40%).

Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: 6ELIT004W | Section: 2 | Open
The module considers the novel in English after 1950 through an investigation of ideas of temporality. Both the legacy of modernism and the events of the Second World War put under strain ideas about the relationship between past, present and future and the module will focus on both the conceptual debates provoked by this through the period and on the effects of these debates on the shape and form of the novel. In exploring these issues, the module will focus on those novels that have most clearly experimented with formal conventions in their responses to them.


Assessment: Critical journal (40%); Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60

Law Studies

4.0 Credits
Law | Course #: 5LLAW009W | Open
The module will consider the law, practice and policy relating to housing law and in particular: the respective rights and obligations of tenants and landlords and the resolution of common conflict between those two groups. The rights of the homeless to access to accommodation and the enforcement and realisation of those rights. The module will develop students’ skills in legal writing and research.


Assessment: Research Task (100%).

Contact Hours: 60

Life Sciences

4.0 Credits
Biomedical Sciences | Course #: 6BIOM004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requesite - 5BIOM007W Applied Pathobiology; 5BICH001W Metabolic Biochemistry
Clinical and technical theory and practice underpinning the current biochemistry and haematology laboratory investigation of selected disorders. Including processes for method evaluation and the incorporation of quality assurance systems for decision making.


Assessment: Group Presentation (50%); Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Human and Health Sciences | Course #: 4HMDS001W. | Section: 2 | Open
This experiential module aims to provide an introduction to the theoretical and conceptual framework for exploring the physical, mental, spiritual and social dimensions of yoga and meditation. Students are given the opportunity to personally experience the effects of yoga postures, breathing, relaxation and meditation techniques. The principles underlying the safe practice of yoga and meditation are considered. For the duration of the module students will be expected to develop a yoga and meditation practice, as well as maintain a learning journal. The journal will enable the student to reflect on the experience of practicing yoga and meditation.


Assessment: Practical (50%) ; Reflective Summary (50%).

Contact Hours: 60

Media, Arts and Design

4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4FIAR003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module helps students to develop their individual starting points for further practical pursuit in contemporary fine art terms, encouraging an independent approach from outset by students to their developing practice. Delivery consists of initial tutorials, reflecting on work so far, with later tutorial input and the programme of gallery visits, seminars and talks to aid the practical and theoretical research process, and increase critical awareness, within an increasingly professional context.


Assessment: Coursework (20%) ; Practical Coursework (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4FIAR004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This theory-based module will explore the extent to which the idea of the artist as outside or ahead of society is a Romantic/ Modernist construct. It will also address the related issues of exoticism/orientalism and euro- centrism in art and critiques of the White Cube, and museum display in general. It will then look at the nuts and bolts of funding and patronage.


Assessment: Presentation (70%) ; Reflective Report (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4FIAR005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module introduces you to a range of essential lens based media practices and conceptual development skills. You will explores lens Based media as a material within a fine art context. Students undertake workshops throughout the module to develop their skills in photography and moving image. They then work collaboratively, or individually when appropriate, to respond to a self initiated brief.


Assessment: Coursework (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4FIAR006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand and develop their understanding of what constitutes drawing today. Students will be encouraged to explore that through practical workshops and independent study, by experimenting widely with both medium and approach. The module will include an introduction, a range of workshops and guest lecturers, a list of gallery visits, seminars and tutorials, all as a support and enabler to self-directed study.


Assessment: Practical coursework (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4FIAR007X | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Note that Modern Art in London is taught in Central London (not at Harrow Campus) requires a GPA of 2.8 (not 3.0 as with all other Media, Arts and Design modules) Theory - No portfolio required. Dire-requesite: 4ELIT010X Art and Society
The module will introduce students to modern art in London, and explore work from the Impressionists to the present day. Topics will include study of the major developments in twentieth century art including Cubism, Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual arts etc. through to the Young Brit. Artists (Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin etc) the Tuner Prize, and the contemporary art scene in London. Teaching will be through gallery visits and lectures to discuss the work.


Assessment: Workbook (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
8.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4IMAG003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
In this module students are introduced to the practice of constructing a photographic image both in the studio and on location. Students will be introduced to the use of electronic flash lighting and large format film cameras used to make high quality photographic images. They will also be introduced to the analogue colour darkroom and the making of C-Type prints. Alongside this students will be introduced to some of the major theoretical debates around the constructed photograph will look at a wide range of relevant contemporary and historical work.


Assessment: Project 1 (40%) ; Project 2 (40%) ; Journal (20%)

Contact Hours: 120
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 4IMAG004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module examines the history and theory of post war photography in relation to cultural and socio-political developments of the period (eg. Abstraction, the Cold War, etc.). Exploring those developments in terms of corresponding theoretical developments formalism, conceptualism, postmodernism, etc. the module traces the post war history of photography through to our contemporary global culture.
Assessment: Exhibition Review (25%) ; Essay (75%).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 5IMAG003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
Students are introduced to some of the main contexts for historical and contemporary photographic practice through lectures and visiting practitioners working in these contexts (photographers, artists, curators, publishers etc). Students elect to work within a particular context (Gallery wall/installation, book/publication or screen) and produce a self-defined project. The module will explore the relationships between artists, photographers and commissioning agencies within the contexts of the gallery, publications of various kinds, the screen and other social and media venues.
Assessment: Project (80%) ; Journal (20%).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Creative Practice | Course #: 5IMAG005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module is about placing your work before a wider audience. The display may take a variety of forms including exhibition, installation, print or electronic publication. You may chose to re-contextualise or develop existing work or produce new work for a specific context and as a group organise, publicise and document the exhibition, installation or publication.


Assessment: Project (80%) ; Group Journal (20%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4JRNL003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - No portfolio required.
This module introduces students to the research, writing and production skills needed to work for online/multimedia outlets. It builds on the work done on writing, research and story genres in the Level 4 module News, Feature, Comment. Students develop basic audio and video production skills; they learn how to gather/record audio/video material, how to edit it, how to structure audio/video material to tell coherent and engaging stories. The module also aims to build student knowledge and understanding of online multimedia. Students produce individual multimedia stories, which they will publish on their own blogs. They also learn the basics of working with a content management system and go on to work in groups on blogs that run live for a short period of time, in a final synoptic assessment linked to the News, Features, Comment module. This assessment tests both the writing skills picked up in the latter and the multimedia and online skills acquired in this module.


Assessment: Audio Portfolio (40%) ; Video Portfolio (40%) ; Group Blog (20%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4JRNL005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical/Theory - No portfolio required.
This module aims to help students develop an understanding of consumer journalism, in particular the lifestyle sector. It builds on the core Level 4 module, News, Features, Comment, allowing students to apply the reporting and writing skills developed there in more consumer/service-oriented contexts. Students learn are introduced to a broad range of lifestyle coverage: motoring, travel, food, beauty/fashion, health, relationships, advice, interior design and technology. Via an exploration of the history of lifestyle publishing, students develop a critical understanding of its relation to post-war consumer culture. The module covers the business models that support lifestyle publications, including customer publishing and advertorials, going on to look at branded content and native advertising online. Students also analyse the ways lifestyle and consumer journalism are being changed by online networks, social media, mobile app, blogs and video blogging.


Assessment: Review/Appraisal (40%) ; Feature/Blog (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4JRNL006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - no portfolio required.
This module introduces students to the history of journalism and aims to give them an understanding of both the broader patterns of social change that underpin that history and also key stories and pieces of journalism from the past. The module starts with the birth of modern journalism in the late eighteenth century, going on to look at the rise of the radical press, the spread of literacy and the development of the popular press. It considers the birth of campaigning and investigative journalism, the beginning of war reporting and the rise of the press barons. Moving to the twentieth century, it considers cinema newsreels and the birth of PR, the rise of radio and TV journalism, the development of modern magazines and tabloid journalism, alternative media in the 60 and 70s and global cable news outlets before moving to consider the development online journalism. Students are encouraged to look at examples of journalism drawn from history and to do their own historical research. Whilst the module will focus primarily on journalism as it developed in the UK and the West, it will also consider more global perspectives where appropriate.


Assessment: Case Study (30%) ; Essay (70%). *All transcripts are issued in UK credits.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4JRNL011X | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: *Note that this module requires a GPA of 2.8 (not 3.0 as with all other Media, Arts and Design modules). Practical - No portfolio required. Level of English: IELTS 6.5
This module uses London as the focus for a journalism project that explores one of the worlds great capital cities from the perspective of an international student and introduces students to the modern magazine business. During this module, students work in groups to develop an idea for a magazine about London, which they then research and write stories for, before going to edit and lay out stories. They end the module by creating a digital dummy of their title. Students learn how to research and write a range of stories and copy for magazines. They develop basic page design skills, coming up with layouts for their own magazine. The magazines they create are print titles - but students will also be encouraged to investigate tablet-based publications, apps and online editions too and to consider the role social media plays in modern magazines.


Assessment: Individual portfolio of magazine word (80%); Group magazine (20%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4MEST014W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Level of English: IELTS 6.5 Theory - No portfolio required.
This module offers a critical exploration of the evolving role celebrities play in the media, public relations, advertising and wider contemporary culture.


Assessment: Seminar Presentation (50%) ; Case Study (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4MEST015W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The module introduces students to the institutional practices and patterns of media around the globe€“ including African, Asian, Middle Eastern, North American and European media. Focusing on some of the main theoretical approaches to media systems and practices in different geographic regions, the module aims to identify key issues in international media and introduce comparative analysis of media systems in different regions.


Assessment: Group Presentation and Written Summary (35%); Participation (15); Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 4PURL002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - No portfolio required.
The aim of this module is to explore a range of public relations and advertising tools used in social and public campaigns with particular focus on contemporary practice. We examine their context: economic, political and socio-cultural influences, and investigate how campaigning methods interrelate. The module engages students in issues raised by campaigns, public debate and discourse in UK, Europe, and globally, and asks what methods and media succeed in diverse situations.


Assessment: Campaign materials (40%) ; Debate & Reflective Statement (50%); Class participation (10%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5JRNL005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module introduces students to the knowledge, skills and techniques needed to be a specialist writer/reporter and looks more generally at the role of specialist journalism in the modern media. It is designed to allow students to build on the core journalistic skills developed in the Level 4 modules News, Features, Comment and Digital First and the Level 5 module Pitch, Produce, Publish and to develop the more specific techniques required for different beats.


Assessment: Short form Portfolio (30%) ; Long form Portfolio (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5JRNL006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
Building on the audio/video work done in the Level 4 module “Digital First”, this module allows students to develop and test their skills in more demanding production tasks and, in particular, to specialise in either traditional broadcast journalism or online and social media. Students choosing the broadcast pathway develop their skills in both radio and TV journalism.


Assessment: Portfolio 1 (40%) ; Portfolio 2 (40%) ; Newsday Portfolio (20%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5JRNL007W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical/Theory - Portfolio required.
This module aims to help students develop a detailed understanding of the complex relationships between media, journalism and modern politics. It combines a critical perspective informed by the latest media research with teaching focused on the skills and working practices of political journalists, media activists and campaigners. Balancing both historical and contemporary perspectives, the module offers a critical assessment of the role of media and journalism in political debate and action. It considers the role of social and digital media in political and social mobilisation and the expression of dissent. Students also
explore the ways in which wars, conflicts and political and social crises, as well as responses to them, are mediated. The module also introduces students to the skills and knowledge needed to cover politics at a local, national and European level, focusing on how to work with official political sources, PRs and press agencies. It looks beyond Westminster to consider how journalists can write effectively and ethically about social movements,
activist politics, environmental issues and global conflicts.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Portfolio (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5MEST010W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module considers the nature of creativity, and the importance of creativity for the media industries, for new forms of digital and social media, and for society in general. Students will take part in creative exercises, go on field trips, and discuss creativity from a number of angles, from individual psychology and artistic expression, to organisational questions of how creativity can be managed, and encouraged.


Assessment: One very short video about creativity – 20 seconds (formative, 0%); One essay of 2,000 words (50%); One video presentation of 8-10 minutes (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5MEST011W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module is about how media industries have historically operated, and above all how they are being changed by technological and other developments affecting both ˜content™ and advertising markets. It draws on various traditions of scholarly enquiry including critical political economy, business and management theory, and media production studies. By understanding how media industries operate and are being transformed, we can better appreciate some of the forces shaping working conditions within the sector and ultimately the kinds of media text (news, TV and radio shows, digital content) that gets created and that circulate within society.


Assessment: Critical Case Study (50%) ; Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5PURL001W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module offers a critical exploration of the evolving role of advertising and promotional culture in the digital world including wider contemporary culture.


Assessment: Seminar Presentation (50%) ; Case Study (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5PURL002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module offers a critical exploration of the evolving role of freedom of expression and censorship across media platforms and in wider contemporary culture.


Assessment: Seminar Presentation (50%) ; Case Study (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 5RDPR003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module explores the genre of speech output in live radio broadcasting and teaches the various ingredients and techniques needed to produce high quality broadcasts. The live broadcasts will incorporate elements of news and magazine production. Specific skills developed include the use of running-orders, live interviewing, the production of short features and wraps, two-ways, presentation and scripted links and continuity devices such as jingles, beds, menus and promos.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Group Blog (30%) ; Essay (20%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Digital Media | Course #: 6RDPR003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module explores the genre of audio and radio drama, and delivers the skills necessary for producing dramatic work in audio form. You will be equipped with the technical, editorial and creative skills needed to record, edit and mix pre-written scripts as pieces of audio drama.


Assessment: Group Coursework (25%); Coursework (55%); Essay (20%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Fashion Industry | Course #: 4FAMN005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required. There are a limited number of places for study abroad students on modules from the Fashion Buying Management and Fashion Merchandising Management degree programmes. With the exception of 4FAMN005W London Fashion in Semester 1, these places are restricted to study abroad students who are majoring in Fashion at their home institution. Note that modules from the Department of Fashion can only be selected at the time of application and cannot be registered for during the Orientation period.
This module will cover the history of London Fashion from the immediate post war period (1945) to the present day looking at the iconic names, designers and retailers associated with London Fashion. The link between culture and fashion will be explored, the significance of key designers and the role of retailers from boutique to department store in satisfying the demands of the consumer. London itself will be explored both as a trend setter and also in the context of its being the home of many iconic heritage brands including Liberty & Burberry as examples. The module will be delivered through a mixture of lectures and seminars but visiting contemporary retailers, exhibitions and galleries including the V & A and The Museum of London will be an essential component.


Assessment: Group Presentation (50%) ; Individual Report (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Fashion Industry | Course #: 5FAMN0011W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required. There are a limited number of places for study abroad students on modules from the Fashion Buying Management and Fashion Merchandising Management degree programmes. With the exception of 4FAMN005W London Fashion in Semester 1, these places are restricted to study abroad students who are majoring in Fashion at their home institution. Note that modules from the Department of Fashion can only be selected at the time of application and cannot be registered for during the Orientation period.
This module covers the theory and retail business practice of visual merchandising, product promotion and interior display. It explores future visual opportunities with regards to the digital space and technological innovation. It enables students to understand and evaluate the visual strategies that retailers employ in order to communicate their brand message, promote store image and increase merchandise sales. Students work on two assignments, an individual report and a group portfolio. The module combines the skills gained on the CAD and Illustration module from level 4 with facilitation to advance Photo shop skills, in order to create a visual merchandising solution for a specific fashion concept and store. Specialist CAD seminar sessions will be scheduled to review and develop the process and application of visual merchandising tools.


Assessment: Individual Report (50%), Group presentaion of creative portfolio (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Fashion Industry | Course #: 5FAMN010W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module has been designed to develop students understanding of the key drivers for the globalisation of the fashion retail industry. A series of lectures will explore the Technological, Economic, Political and Socio-cultural trends behind the globalisation of fashion retail. The key models relating to retail globalisation will be reviewed and applied to contemporary fashion case studies with seminars focusing on student led discussion of the key success factors and risks for businesses expanding internationally. It will include a live project with ensuing rollout plan. The module will introduce the key concepts relating to consumer behaviour in the fashion with specific reference to the importance of understanding culture in global markets.


Assessment: Group Presentation (40%) ; Open Book Exam (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Fashion Industry | Course #: 5FAMN011W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module covers the theory and retail business practice of visual merchandising, product promotion and interior display. It explores future visual opportunities with regards to the digital space and technological innovation. It enables students to understand and evaluate the visual strategies that retailers employ in order to communicate their brand message, promote store image and increase merchandise sales. Students work on two assignments, an individual report and a group portfolio. The module combines the skills gained on the CAD and Illustration module from level 4 with facilitation to advance Photoshop skills, in order to create a visual merchandising solution for a specific fashion concept and store. Specialist CAD seminar sessions will be scheduled to review and develop the process and application of visual merchandising tools.


Assessment: Individual Report (50%), Group presentation of creative portfolio (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Journalism and Mass Communication [Studio] | Course #: 4RDPR004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - No portfolio required.
This module is designed to equip students with the skills and knowledge to write and prepare copy and audio for radio production to be used in a news context. Students will create content for live new broadcast and initiate, research and produce news stories for online distribution.


Assessment: Group Coursework 1 (20%); Individual Coursework 2 (40%); Individual Coursework 3 (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 4CINE004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The module focuses on key approaches to and debates about genre in film and television. Popular Hollywood genre will be approached through focusing on the history, context, form, aesthetics of film noir, melodrama and the gangster film. Television will be addressed through an examination of popular British and American genres.
Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Essay (50%). *All transcripts are issued in UK credits.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 4ILLU003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Level of English: IELTS 6.0 Practical - No portfolio required.
This module is designed to support the development of skills and understanding in drawing practices focused on observational study of the human figure. This module is delivered through studio figure drawing with some location study and exhibition visits.


Assessment: Drawing pdf portfolio (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 4ILLU005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module examines image media in relationship to industry and institutions; media texts; audiences; technology and the effect of social media on the consumption and generation of culture and social interaction. To introduce students to theories and debates about mass media and its role in contemporary society. To provide tools for analysing and deconstructing images in mass media, social media, media production and consumption. To stimulate and enhance your own research and skills in analytical thinking and reasoning.


Assessment: Essay + Blog (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 4MUSH004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical/Theory dependant on choice - Portfolio required.
This module enables the student to study in an area of individual focus applied to the Commercial Music profession. Module outputs can be combined with corresponding modules at levels 4, 5 and 6 allowing the student to graduate with a focused portfolio of work to a professional level employing skills and experience acquired through study.


Assessment: Portfolio (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 4MUSI004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - No portfolio required.
This module is for students wishing to develop their songwriting ability, but who are not registered on the BACM. Through lectures and demonstrations on contemporary practice students will develop their awareness of modern techniques used in commercially relevant songwriting. Attention will be paid to the genre specifics as well as to the pertinent industry requirements of popular songwriting.


Assessment: Portfolio (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 5CINE005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
An examination of television forms, including the quality drama series/serial, situation and sketch comedy, the aesthetics of such forms and the nature of their address to their audiences. The module will address the UK and the US industry contexts; networks, studios and channel branding; reflexivity in cult TV and internet presence.


Assessment: Essay (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 5ILLU003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
The module is designed to support experimental and interdisciplinary practice, enabling collaboration, exchange and interaction with other subject disciplines both within the MF&VC cluster and more widely within the School. You are encouraged to work flexibly in developing concepts and outcomes through varied technical processes supported by personal research, visual and design experimentation.


Assessment: Presentation (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 5MUCO001W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
Students design and execute a one-day academic conference on an agreed, current music sociology topic. Student involvement in the co-creation of knowledge within the module starts with them agreeing on a Call for Papers, and continues with their peer-reviewing anonymized Abstracts, finally submitting and presenting their own paper or poster at a one- day conference advertised outside of the university.


Assessment: Presentation (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 5MUSH004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical/Theory dependant on choice - Portfolio required.
This module enables the student to further develop study in an area of individual focus applied to the Commercial Music profession. Module outputs can be combined with corresponding modules at level 6 allowing the student to graduate with a focused portfolio of work to a professional level employing skills and experience acquired in other modules. Areas of focus are: Composition for Media 201; Improvisation; Strategies for Music Education; Songwriting


Assessment: Portfolio (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Music, Film, and Visual Communication | Course #: 5MUSH006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical/Theory - Portfolio required.
This module aims to link academic and critical thinking to real world creative practices. By researching and critically evaluating an area of the current creative industry, students will undertake a rigours research and enquiry program to facilitate a thorough understanding of their chosen disciple. Examples of this could include a songwriter recognising the need for both an understanding of the domain and the need to innovate within that domain.


Assessment: Presentation (50%) ; Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Photography and Film [Theory] | Course #: 5CINE006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
The application of psychoanalytic theory in film studies is the major theoretical emphasis of the module. Particular attention is given to the idea of cinema as a means by which anxieties and desires emanating from within the human unconscious can be represented. Relevant themes and areas of study are: fantasy; gaze; identification; otherness; pleasure; scopophilia; spectatorship; voyeurism.


Assessment: Written Essay - 3500-4000 words (100%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4ANIM004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - No portfolio required.
You will be given the opportunity to produce animation clips using a variety of production techniques. This first-hand experience will allow you to form an opinion of the relative merits of a variety of animation methods. There is scope for experimentation and the development of an individual approach. The integrated theory component of this module develops your critical faculties alongside your personal journey of discovery. Self Evaluation of your performances will help you to understand your own work with increased clarity.


Assessment: Critical Portfolio (20%) ; Practical Projects (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4GPDS003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module aims to promote joy and enthusiasm for the design and use of letterforms. It seeks to develop awareness and sensitivity in the selection and manipulation of letterforms to create engaging and effective communication. It introduces the historical, cultural and technological developments that have influenced the vast array of forms available for the design and presentation of ideas and information through the visible word.


Assessment: Module Workbook (40%) ; Final Project (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4GPDS005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module provides an introduction to the various forms of visual storytelling. You will learn how ideas and information may be constructed and communicated through a variety of representational means and media. Through practical workshops and project tasks, you will be invited to explore ways by which language, ideas and imagery may be presented through linear and non-linear narratives.


Assessment: Research Workbook (40%) ; Project (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4GPDS006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
In this module you will explore and examine the means by which we represent ideas, objects and events within our world. Through general research you will gain an awareness of the historical developments of the representational systems currently in use. Through project work and introductory exercises you will explore and examine the representational means and systems available for communication.


Assessment: Research and visualization (40%) ; Project (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4MEST004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module further develops your skills in media practice and conceptual development across the course media: moving image, photography and new media. You then work collaboratively, or individually when appropriate, to respond to a given brief and so demonstrate your ability to deploy your production skills and creative capacity.


Assessment: Creative Project (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4MEST005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This theory module focuses on media representations of many key facets of contemporary experience, including urban environments, gender, ethnicity, technology, history, and politics. The module thereby provides critical and analytical tools for the analysis and interpretation of a broad range of contemporary audio-visual and interactive media, examining how they shape our experience of the world.


Assessment: Audio-visual essay (50%) ; Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4MEST006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
This module allows you to engage with the practices and characteristics of defined media traditions, choosing typically from still image, interactive, and moving image practices. The emphasis is on exploratory approaches, where traditions, ideas and technologies are subject to creative play, testing, experiment and realisation.


Assessment: Media Exploration Project (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 4TVPR005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Theory - No portfolio required.
This module introduces students to the key concepts and historical development of Television Drama in the US and UK Television industries, exam-ining texts from the 1950s to early 21st Century. This involves (i) analysis of British & US television culture and the impacts of technological change and policy on both historical and contemporary television practice including the scheduling, branding and commissioning of programmes; (ii) the study of pioneer production methodologies as television drama moved out from the studio to location based production models (iii) an introduction to writers and directors who extended the form of television drama (iv) the ambitious development of drama into recognisable genres.


Assessment: Participation (15%) ; Group Presentation (30%) ; Essay (55%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 5ANIM004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical – Portfolio required.
This Digital Pathways module supports you to help develop your digital animation skills in a specific area of interest. Understanding how your interests fit in to the wider world (both industrial and academic) is vital to your personal and professional development, and this module aims to support you to pursue an individual specialism that is both creative and informed. Typical paths for research include: 2D animation, 3D character animation, and interactive animation.


Assessment: Critical Portfolio (20%) ; Practical Projects (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 5MEST003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Practical - Portfolio required.
The creative industry increasingly demands multi-skilling, as well as an awareness of the shifting relationships between media producers and consumers. This practical module engages students with issues around media convergence to reinforce their identity as contemporary media practitioners with skills across discipline boundaries. It also further develops the ability to reflect critically on project development and outcomes.


Assessment: Convergent Media Project (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 5TVPR001W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requesite: 4TVPR003W Introduction To Television Production or equivalent. Portfolio required.
Students engage with the concept of promotional video content encompassing the production of corporate, advertising, Third sector, viral, and public information films. The emphasis is on creative ideas development through group brainstorming sessions. Students are encouraged to source Live Briefs building opportunities to engage with the commercial world. Students develop ideas across the 6 weeks and conclude the module producing a promotional film or advertisement for an identified client to a negotiated length, most commonly 30 seconds. This module offers students rich opportunities to develop their PDP skills as they build Media and Commercial contacts.


Assessment: Individual Project (30%); Group Project (30%); Log and Critical Analysis (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Transmedia | Course #: 5TVPR002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: 4TVPR003W Introduction To Television Production or equivalent. Portfolio required
This module encourages innovation and enterprise. Students are encouraged to think outside the box in terms of content creation and dissemination. They are introduced to non-mainstream approaches to programme making and to content created for the internet and convergent media. Students work in small production groups to develop ideas through brainstorming and research into non-factual subjects. These can include dance, animation, poems, comedy and short dramas. This is a non-genre specific module that encourages high production values, experimentation and the exploration of inventive programme structures for internet platforms and global niche audiences.


Assessment: Programme (40)% ; Individual Contribution (40%) ; Critical Analysis (20%).

Contact Hours: 60

Politics and International Relations

4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 4PIRS007W | Section: 2 | Open
The political importance of migration has increased sharply in recent decades. The module w- hich focuses on Europe but has a strong comparative global element - studies the entire migration process and the many factors shaping it: domestic pressures (social, economic, political) in sending states; globalization processes; the policies of host states and regions; the active role of migrants themselves. The module also evaluates the main theories used in migration scholarship.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 5SOCL010W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores the impact of globalisation on the arts, including music, literature, visual culture and museums. It will look at the interdependence of economic, social and artistic practices and consider the challenges that globalisation poses to local and indigenous arts, as well ways in which the arts have contributed to the processes of globalisation. It will also examine the legal contexts of ownership of works of art, intellectual property and sampling, and the digital futures of the arts.


Assessment: Research report (70%) ; Presentation (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 6PIRS010W | Section: 2 | Open
Humanitarian intervention is an issue of unique importance which continues to be one of the dominant controversies of our time. Key events in the post-Cold War era, from the 1994 genocide in Rwanda to the 2011 intervention in Libya, have generated often highly divisive debate regarding the right and responsibility of the international community to save strangers. This module will examine the history of humanitarian intervention, its moral and philosophical basis and the primary sources of contestation such as its legal status, the question of legitimate authority, and the balance between order and justice.


Assessment: Essay (70%); Case Study Project (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 6PIRS012W | Section: 2 | Open
This module introduces students to psychological approaches to the study of politics, focusing particularly on issues of power in governance. From the basis of three leading areas of psychological theory (psychoanalysis, social and cognitive psychology), the module investigates a range of applications to governance practice and state-society relations. These include: the manipulation of political discourse; the politics of happiness; the political mind and governance dysfunction; institutional discrimination; ideology and state-societal power relations; authority, conformity and dissent; collective action and political change; and projections of the self in society. The module introduces students to the discipline of political psychology and allows for a re-evaluation of themes of governance and power from this new perspective.


Assessment: Analytical Exercise (25%) ; Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 6PIRS017W | Section: 2 | Open
Social and political movements - the main, even only, way that many people do politics - are established features of contemporary societies. They bring new ideas into public discourse and challenge the practices of governments and states. The module analyses a representative sample of contemporary movements, in the developed world and in other regions; studies the wide range of factors, national and transnational, shaping movement birth, development and decline; and evaluates the main theories used in social movement scholarship.


Assessment: Essay (40%) ; Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics and International Relations | Course #: 6PIRS018W | Section: 2 | Open
Each year the Department of Politics and International Relations will offer an advanced module at Level 6 that addresses a specialist topic or contemporary theme within the discipline of Politics, International Relations and/or Development Studies. The special topic module is primarily aimed at those students who wish to undertake postgraduate studies in the field, as its specialist research focus allows for a detailed investigation into the chosen special topic. The module provides a platform for students to work with academic staff in exploring key themes, theories and thinkers, and/or contemporary issues in Politics, International Relations and/or Development Studies. The content of the module will vary from year to year, although the module will broadly allow students to approach a key theme in the discipline (e.g. violence, justice, war) through a body of knowledge or specialist literature (e.g. Hannah Arendt, John Rawls, Carl Schmitt, Michel Foucault).


Assessment: Conference Report (50%); Conference Paper (50%).

Contact Hours: 60

Science and Technology

4.0 Credits
Biomedical Science | Course #: 4BIOM004W | Section: 2 | Open
The emphasis for this module is to develop an understanding of how the structural organisation of different cell types within a tissue/organ enable and support the tissue/organ’s normal function. For every tissue/organ studied, the functional role of that tissue/organ in the whole body, as covered in Human Physiology, will be studied. A significant component of the module will be evaluating the impact of pathological processes on whole body physiology and integrity.


Assessment: Coursework (40%) ; Essay (20%) ; In-class test (Multiple-Choice Question Test) (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Biomedical Science | Course #: 5BIOM002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: Cell Biology, Biochemistry
Students will build on their knowledge of classical, population and diagnostic genetics and genomics from core module: Medical Genetics and Genomics (level 5 – 1st semester). Students will be introduced to the field of applied medical genetics through the detailed study of both common and rare human genetic disorders. Several complex disorders will be explored in detail from different perspectives. The importance of medical genetics will be highlighted through the consideration of recent developments, current practices and new perspectives in modern medicine, including ethical aspects.


Assessment: Oral Presentation (40%) ; Practical Report (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Biomedical Science | Course #: 6BIOL002W | Section: 2 | Open
The cell is the basic unit of life and an understanding of molecular basis of cellular structures offers profound insights into biology and applications of the biological sciences. This module will allow students to explore the biochemistry and biophysics of these structures and the processes that rely upon them and thereby deepen their understanding of the molecular basis of life.


Assessment: Coursework (50%); Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 4COSC005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: Programming Principles I
The module aims to develop skills in the selection and implementation of problem-solving algorithms. It will consider analysis of algorithms in terms of soundness and completeness, and introduce more advanced programming methods including the implementation of classes and methods and more sophisticated data structures such as lists, queues and trees.


Assessment: Practical Exercises (50%) ; Programming Assignment 2 (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5BUIS002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requesite: Business Mathematics
This module introduces students to the Operational Research (OR) techniques, commonly used for business analytics, such as Linear programming, forecasting and simulation. It helps students to develop and analyse analytical models that support making effective business
decisions


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5COSC004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module introduces the student to the various layers of software architectures, from the network to the application layer, to enable them to maintain, build and deploy a typical client server system.


Assessment: Exam (50%); Coursework (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5COSC005W | Section: 2 | Open
The Android mobile programming architecture. Restrictions of using small devices such as mobile phones tablets and wearables. Programming user interfaces, networking, persistent storage and multi-threading. Device profiling, application deployment and installation.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (50%) ; Coursework 2 (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5COSC006W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will cover the analysis, design and implementation of commercial web applications from a programming and database perspective and will be suitable for students with a background in SQL, programming, HTML, and browser scripting. A server-side language will be covered to the depth required for implementing high-quality functional applications that appropriately fulfil user requirements.


Assessment: Phase Test 1 (50%); Phase Test 2 (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5MMCS002W | Section: 2 | Open
The module provides students with essential skills and practice in a range of usability techniques, how to conduct usability studies and focuses on the role of the user within the design process. The importance of experimental design and statistical analysis is illustrated through real world examples. The ability to interpret and critically discuss results is stressed throughout.


Assessment: Group Coursework (60%) ; Usability Testing (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5MMCS003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides practical knowledge and understanding of client-side or/else front-end development programming using advanced HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript. Client-side technologies, including HTML5 Audio and Video are covered together with a client-side scripting language, a UI and CSS framework and a client-side scripting framework. The module also covers issues pertaining to front-end security.


Assessment: In-class Test (40%) ; Coursework (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 5SENG001W | Section: 2 | Open
The module equips the student with the theoretical and practical background of computing and computer science towards the problem solving strategies, design, implementation and evaluation of computationally efficient algorithms. Given the vast range of applicable problems, e.g., technology, economics, biosciences, society, environment, mathematics, game theory, the module particularly draws upon current real world problems.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 6CCGD002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Please note that previous programming experience is required for this module.
Creating robust artificial intelligence is one of the greatest challenges for game developers, yet the commercial success of a game is often dependent upon the quality of its AI. This module introduces an engagingly realistic and immersive experience in modern videogames for creating game terrains to simulate complex behaviour of game objects. The main focus of the module is to learn how to create an automatic random game world with metrics to generate human like intelligent behaviours primarily in non-player characters (NPCs). The algorithms and logic covered in this module are also widely used in a variety of computing sectors which will make the module a great choice for CS and SE students.


Assessment: Coursework (60%) ; Exam (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 6CCGD003W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Please note that previous programming experience is required for this module.
Creating robust artificial intelligence is one of the greatest challenges for game developers, yet the commercial success of a game is often dependent upon the quality of its AI. This module introduces an engagingly realistic and immersive experience in modern videogames for creating game terrains to simulate complex behaviour of game objects. The main focus of the module is to learn how to create an automatic random game world with metrics to generate human like intelligent behaviours primarily in non-player characters (NPCs). The algorithms and logic covered in this module are also widely used in a variety of computing sectors which will make the module a great choice for CS and SE students.


Assessment: Coursework 1 Practical Work (40%); Coursework 2 Practical Work (60%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 6COSC002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Please note that previous programming experience is required for this module.
This module examines various aspects of computer security and forensics giving a sound introduction to theoretical and practical areas such as network security, cryptography, security architecture and operations security. A substantial amount of work will be laboratory based involving the deployment of security tools, the hardening of operating systems and the analysis of compromised systems.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: 6COSC003W | Section: 2 | Open
The module equips the students with the theoretical and practical knowledge to apply intelligent information technology on the Web in order to create the next generation of products, services and frameworks based on the internet for the sake of using the Web as a huge and trustworthy knowledge source for a variety of contemporary problems in society, environment, economy. The module draws upon many fields such as Web text mining end engineering, information retrieval and search engines, Semantic and Social web and the Web of data, which underpin the contemporary Web as a source of knowledge.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 4BIOL001W | Section: 2 | Open
A study of how molecular bioscience can help solve biological problems encountered by human beings. The theme followed molecular bioscience will start with a consideration of how sequencing the human genome and bioinformatic analysis has led to the incarnation of personal medicine. It will consider how human diseases and conditions are being treated in the 21st Century: the development of new antibiotics the use of stem cell biology and the science of tissue regeneration. Specific studies will be made of cancer and neuro-degeneration to show how modern molecular biochemical and biophysical techniques are being used by Bioscientists to study these diseases. In addition the wider applications of molecular science in agriculture forensic science and biotechnology will be explored.


Assessment: Magazine Article (40%) ; Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 4PHYM002W | Section: 2 | Open
The module explores the scope of pharmacology and introduces the concept of drugs as biologically active, selective molecules. In addition, drug interactions with cellular targets will be studied in order to provide examples of their clinical usage and consideration of potential adverse effects. Selected experimental techniques used in pharmacology will be reviewed. The significance of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in determining systemic drug action will also be studied.


Assessment: Coursework (40%) ; Exam (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 5BICH002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: Pass or condoned credit Biochemistry level 4.
The module will build on the cell biology, biochemistry, information technology and critical thinking skills acquired at level 4. This module will allow students to develop skills in the area of bioinformatics including the computational analysis of DNA and protein sequences using alignment and evolutionary models. Students will use a variety of computational methods to assign gene and protein function including data from gene expression analysis and proteomics.


Assessment: Group Coursework (50%) ; Individual Blog (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 5BIOL001W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: Condoned credit Cell Biology (or equivalent)
The physiological and metabolic diversity of micro-organisms (eukaryotes, prokaryotes, archae) and their impacts on the environment (e.g. nutrient cycles); and man (e.g. technological applications) will be explored. Safe handling of micro-organisms, their identification, enumeration and control also will be considered.


Assessment: Portfolio (60%) ; In-class Test (40%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 5EVBI001W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will explore regional and global problems and their impact on the world’s resources, the environment and human societies (social and economic). The underlying causes of environmental and societal pressures, e.g. climate change and infectious and non-infectious diseases, will be identified and examined and the risks these pose, e.g. water scarcity and conflicts and biodiversity loss, examined.


Assessment: Coursework (30%) ; Individual and Group Case-study (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 5HMNT003W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will examine the complexity of practices and behaviors in health and disease in all its diversity, including effects on society’s health, well-being and economy. Understanding the nature of human choice related to health and exploring the role and responsibility of government promoting societal health outcomes. Students will also consider the possibilities of intervention strategies to improve behaviour-related health.


Assessment: Coursework 1 (30%) ; Coursework 2 (10%) ; Exam (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Life Sciences | Course #: 5PHYM002W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: At least a condoned credit in Human Physiology (or equivalent)
This module examines the fundamental mechanisms of cell communication in mammalian physiology, both intra- and intercellular. It explores common and divergent mechanisms that underlie the function of three principal systems (endocrine, immune and nervous), ultimately presenting the student with the notion that whilst systems can function autonomously, they must also function as integrated networks.


Assessment: Structured Proforma (20%) ; Lab Report (30%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 4PSYC003W | Section: 2 | Open
The module considers human psychology and behaviour from a biological perspective. The module assumes no prior knowledge and provides a basic introduction into the breadth of psychobiology, neurology, psychophysiology and related areas. This includes introductory level neuroanatomy and physiology, progressing to higher organisation of the nervous system and functional anatomy. Also introduced are basic physiology, the biological bases of behaviour and learning, nociception, control systems and the fundamentals of evolution and genetics.


Assessment: Presentation (20%) ; Exam (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 4PSYC004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides a broad based, contemporary view of developmental Psychology taking a lifespan approach. It explores key topics such as attachment, language development and aging. The module includes the interacting contributions of biology and the environment to the developing person, and their social context throughout the lifespan.


Assessment: Essay (40%) ; Exam (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 5PSYC007W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: Developmental Psychology
Considers topics in the field of lifespan development (from pre-birth to old age), e.g. (neuro)constructivism; Prenatal Programming; Cerebral Lateralization; Multisensory Integration; Attention; Educational Neuroscience; Theory of Mind & Deafness; Autism & Language Alignment; SES, Family & Culture. These topics are widely discussed in the literature, and will give students depth of knowledge, both in terms of theory as well as practice (eg. intervention). The aim of the module is to let students discover the relevant building blocks of development, as well as have them take a lifespan approach. Teaching and learning methods include lectures (including guest lectures by distinguished external speakers), student-led discussion panels in seminars, academic writing skills, and independent study.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 5WSEL020W | Section: 2 | Open
Marylebone Campus

This module will demonstrate how utilising the transformative and empowering tools of positive psychology can enhance professional well-being and contribute to personal and professional success. The identification and assessment of strengths, perceived as the foundation for personal development and performance management will be explored, as well as a successful alignment of strengths with personal goals and their attainment. This will be complemented by an investigation of happiness (or positive well-being) in all areas of life. Theoretical perspectives on ‘flow’ and ‘engagement’ will also be examined and techniques of coaching psychology for enhancing positivity will be practice. This module is ideal for those students who wants to develop positive strategies of resilience, innovation and creativity to achieve success. Students will engage with different perspectives of positive organisational behaviour, especially as they relate to developing strategies for success within a workplace environment.
This module is great if you are interested in:
- Gaining experience of thinking about the tools for managing your performance in a business, work environment and/or organisational setting.
- Developing an understanding of the importance of well-being and positive psychology for personal and professional development.
- Stretching yourself to think practically about your own work goals and professional development.


Assessment: In-Class Test (TBC %); Individual Reflective Report (TBC %)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 6PSYC004W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: 5PSYC002W Brain Mind and Behaviour
Much of what is known about cognition has come from studying what happens when it goes wrong. This module aims to provide students with a deeper understanding of the relationship between cognition and cortical function, using the effects of cortical lesions as an indicator of brain organisation and localisation of function. Disorders examined will include those of memory, perception, thinking, and language, and the neuropsychological lesions underlying them.


Assessment: Group Coursework (40%) ; Exam (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 6PSYC005W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: 4PSYC001W Social Psychology, 4PSYC002W Cognitive Psychology
The primary aims of this module are to facilitate students’ understanding of some of the key counselling and psychotherapeutic theories and frameworks and to enable students to evaluate the various approaches in terms of the available research evidence along with current debates about the nature of psychotherapy and psychotherapy related research. This module does not prepare students to become Counselling Psychologists but will give students a sound basis for understanding and identifying the further study and training required to become a Counselling Psychologist.


Assessment: Group Presentation (30%) ; Exam (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: 6PSYC006W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requisites: 1PSY415 Introduction to Cognition, Learning & Personality
This module considers the interdisciplinary and applied nature of health psychology, exploring biological, psychological and socio-cultural determinants of health and illness. Topics include approaches to health and illness behaviour, management of long-term conditions, health-care communication, psychoneuromimmunology and wellbeing. Emphasis is given to an evidence and practice-based approach.


Assessment: Coursework (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60

Social and Historical Studies

4.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: 6CRIM003W | Section: 2 | Open
Increasing levels of punishment in global society; harshness of prison regimes and community-based punishments; examines nature and critiques of contemporary penal punishment; considers present-day trends and forms of punishment in detail in UK and elsewhere; particular reference to the worldwide importance placed on the use of imprisonment.


Assessment: Report on Research (50%) and Essay (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: 6CRIM004W | Section: 2 | Open
Increasing levels of punishment in global society; harshness of prison regimes and community-based punishments; examines nature and critiques of contemporary penal punishment; considers present-day trends and forms of punishment in detail in UK and elsewhere; particular reference to the worldwide importance placed on the use of imprisonment.


Assessment: Research Report (50%); Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: 6CRIM005W | Section: 2 | Open
Considers ways in which psychological theories have developed understandings of criminal behaviour and explores influential role of these theories on informing criminal justice policy, crime reduction/prevention initiatives and strategies. Students will evaluate psychology’s contribution to study of crime, and consider the arguably contentious role that it plays in this field.


Assessment: Essay Plan (25%); Essay (75%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Criminology | Course #: 6CRIM009W | Section: 2 | Open
Media portrayals of immigrants as criminals ignore discrimination within the criminal justice system, as well as wider issues of social exclusion. This module examines immigrants€™ relationship with the criminal justice system. It also introduces students to the criminological study of the immigration control system, including immigration offences, detention and deportation. It ends by examining the impact of anti-terrorism powers on immigrant communities.


Assessment: Debate (50%); Essay (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST004W | Section: 2 | Open
Social and cultural change in twentieth century Britain. Key themes include class and structural change; the demise of Victorian Values and liberalisation; expansion of mass media; the related area of youth culture; tradition versus modernity; ethnic diversity in Britain; the social, economic, religious and political determinants of national identities - English, Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish and Irish.


Assessment: Statistical Analysis (40%); Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST006W | Section: 2 | Open
France; Interwar years; German invasion 1940; Pétain, Vichy and collaboration; De Gaulle in London; Free French; war, race and empire; French anti-semitism; anti-semitic laws; roundups and deportations; Holocaust; French ‘gestapo’; everyday resistance; organised resistance; sabotage; cinema and literature; liberation; purges; Allies and GIs; Resistance myth; Holocaust memory.


Assessment: Essay (50%) ; Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module examines the Suez Crisis in British decolonisation and the decline of Britain as a world power. It considers the nature of the British Empire; the impact of the Second World War; Whitehall and decolonisation; Anglo Egyptian relations; the course of the Suez Crisis; the Suez Crisis and the special relationship; Suez and the end of Empire; East of Suez and a continuing world role.


Assessment: Essay (70%); Documentary Analysis (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST008W | Section: 2 | Open
Suffrage; legal rights and legislation; feminism and womens issues during the world wars; the 1950s/1960s; the Womens Liberation Movement; transnational and transatlantic networks; organised feminism and protests; feminism in popular culture.


Assessment: Blog (50%); Exam (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST009W | Section: 2 | Open
Legacy of World War Two; British military occupation; Britain and the creation of the Federal Republic; diplomatic relations; Britain and the German Democratic Republic; Representations in the media; Germany in popular culture and sport.


Assessment: Report (40%); Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST010W | Section: 2 | Open
Nineteenth-century origins of international organisations; approaches to international organisations; League of Nations; Council of Europe; European Coal and Steel Community; United Nations; European Economic Community; globalisation; international security; economic prosperity; peace keeping; Cold War.


Assessment: Essay (70%); Project Report (30%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: 6HIST013W | Section: 2 | Open
Winston Churchill. His career, achievements and legacy. A consideration of the value of biography as a discipline; debates about ‘great men’ in history; Churchill and his times.


Assessment: Take-home test (50%), Essay (50%)

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL003W | Section: 2 | Open
The module examines families and intimate life, drawing on the latest research in family studies in the UK and North America. It explores the concepts of family practices (the ‘doing’ of family), intimacy (the emotional quality of families and personal relationships) and issues in family policy and intervention. It examines the diversity of family, parenting and personal relationship practices, as well as anthropological and queer approaches to families and intimacy.


Assessment: Reflective Writing (40%); Essay (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module will challenge your thinking about the body. It unpacks Shilling's threshold concept of the 'unfinished body' by engaging with a variety of bodily phenomena, such as the cultures of death and dying, healthy lifestyles, identity as embodiment, and the medicalisation of the body. These analyses are further underpinned by examining of the body's relationship to power via the concepts of discourse, medicalisation and inequality.


Assessment: Critical Analysis (30%); Case Study Essay (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL005W | Section: 2 | Open
This module introduces key theoretical debates in political sociology around activism, protests and social movements. Particular attention is given to the impact of globalization and new media technologies on protest movements; and to how such movements operate in the public sphere. The module also explores a range of historical and contemporary examples of protest events and social movements.


Assessment: Reflective Blog (20%); Case Study Essay (80%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL007W | Section: 2 | Open
This module examines the processes of the production and dissemination of news in contemporary societies. The main focus is on assessing the consequences of the concentration of media ownership and whether new media offers a viable alternative to monopolised media production. Based on case studies, the module analyses how news is produced, both linguistically and institutionally, the politics of citizenship and the need for a rigorous public realm.


Assessment: Proposal (30%); Case Study Project (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL008W | Section: 2 | Open
This module examines how immigration and emigration impacts on the structure and culture of local environments. Cultural fields such as literature, music, art and cuisine are explored to discuss the cultural networks and exchanges resulting from migration. Concepts of self, ‘other’, nation and community are used to study how contemporary immigrant identities are shaped by new mobilities, mixed cultures and new ways of communication.


Assessment: Presentation (30%); Analytical Exercise (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL009W | Section: 2 | Open
This module explores how the meanings of race are made and remade in acts of creative consumption. By consuming race, we make sense of other groups and cultures, communicate our own identities, express needs and desires, and discover new ways of thinking and being. Ranging across the terrain of popular culture, and finding race in some unusual and unexpected places, this module offers fresh and innovative ways of thinking about the centrality of race to our lives.


Assessment: Critical Reading (30%); Essay (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: 6SOCL011W | Section: 2 | Open
Education shapes pupil identities through the structure, policies, curriculum, culture and psycho-social dynamics of schooling. Using gender as the lens, and an intersectional analysis to evaluate other differences e.g., class, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and disability, this module examines identity work at school. Students will employ autobiographical methods to evaluate how they negotiated their educational identities at school.


Assessment: Autobiographical Essay (100%).

Contact Hours: 60

Social Sciences and Humanities

4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4ELIT006W | Section: 2 | Open
This module introduces students to both the varieties of modern poetry and the ways in which poetry engages with the world. It focuses principally on poetic works drawn from the last 200 years and is particularly concerned with poetrys role in examining, interrogating and contributing to discussions about social and political issues. Topics may include: the role of poetry; gender and the body; political voices; poetry and place; sexuality; violence and conflict.


Assessment: Close Reading Exercise (Coursework) (30%) ; Essay (70%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4ELIT010X | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Please note that there are extra costs for special exhibits that students will attend on this module.
This module is an introduction to the visual culture of London, including painting, architecture, photography and contemporary media. Students will visit the major art galleries to examine how art works exhibitions and cultural organisations can be understood within wider social contexts. The sessions also include museums and historical sites, such as the British Museum and St Pauls Cathedral, as well as art galleries. The classes will explore how these institutions reveal the complex cultural identity and history of London. The module develops skills in visual analysis and critical thinking about culture.


Assessment: Essay (100%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4ELIT012W | Section: 2 | Open
Pre-requisite: Dis-requesite: 4ELIT011W Writing London: Creative Writing about London
This module introduces students to elements of creative writing and offers students the opportunity to engage with London as raw material for their work and to explore issues of space, place and identity. With factual input from law, politics, sociology and history, students will be supported in using that material to experiment in a range of written forms and styles including poetry, prose, drama, life-writing and journalism.


Assessment: Writing Journal (20%) ; Final Creative Piece (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4ENGL004W | Section: 2 | Open
This introductory module critically examines a number of popular fallacies about language and specific languages through a careful examination of the facts. In the process, students are introduced to a range of linguistic knowledge and theoretical issues in a manner that assumes no prior knowledge of linguistics. The module also outlines a number of infamous controversies within language study.


Assessment: Presentation (40%) ; Portfolio (60%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4LANS004W | Section: 2 | Open
This module provides an introduction to Intercultural Communication. It draws on theory from a range of disciplines to help students better understand the complexities of communicating with people from other cultures. Students will be helped, using intercultural theorists, to become more aware of how culture influences them and others, and to reflect on how it affects the ways they communicate and act. It then aims to develop students™ ability to cope with these complexities.


Assessment: Cross-cultural Analysis (25%); Essay (25%) ; Reflective Project (50%).

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
English, Linguistics & Cultural Studies | Course #: 4LANS005W | Section: 2 | Open