American University of Paris
Fall Semester Elective 2017
12 – 18 credits

Semester students at AUP select 3 – 5 courses from a range of subjects offered for a total of 12 – 18 credits. Students may elect to take French Language, but it is not a requirement. Semester courses are offered in an array of disciplines, including Art History, Business, Film, Communications, Politics and Psychology, among many others.


Application Deadline
April 1, 2017
Apps accepted until May 1 as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)

Highlights

  • Earn an SAI Global Leadership Certificate
  • Join active student clubs
  • 200+ courses taught each semester in a range of disciplines

Program Dates
August 24, 2017 – December 20, 2017


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Freshman (1st year) or above.

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 88+ or IELTS: 6.5+, or proof of attending school in English for 3+ years.



Arts and Sciences
Business Administration
Communications
Comparative Literature and English
Computer Science, Mathematics & Science
Economics
English Literature & Writing
Film Studies
History
International Comparative Politics
Language

Arts and Sciences

4.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: AN 1002 | Open
Socio-cultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures. This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach. Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation). While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism. Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: AN 3061 | Open
Presents an anthropological approach to the study of cities, providing students with theoretical and methodological tools to think critically about the meaning of urban life today. Approaches this topic from a cross-cultural perspective, with a number of readings focusing on Paris in particular. Students will undertake a Paris-based qualitative research project during the course of the semester.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 1003 | Open
Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch.

The course has an extra course fee of 25 euros.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 1020 | Open
Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th- century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.
Contact Hours: 60
1.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 1030 | Open
Les Jeunes ont la parole is a program organized by the Louvre Museum, in cooperation with a dozen Parisian educational institutions including The American University of Paris, to attract the younger generation into its venerable walls. As part of the Louvres Les Nocturnes du vendredi, participating students dialogue with peers and other museum visitors around a work of art that he or she has studied in depth. A unique hands-on opportunity, the one-credit course involves preparatory meetings, preliminary research, Friday-evening presentations, and a final write-up.
Contact Hours: 15
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 2000 | Open
Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times though the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 2011 | Open
Pre-requisite: AH1000 Intro to Western Art I is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.
Introduces first the specific contributions of Greek art to the Western tradition. Then presents the diversification of these achievements in the Etruscan civilization and in the Hellenistic age. Examines how the Romans absorbed, continued, and creatively transformed Greek and Etruscan art and passed the ancient heritage on to medieval and early modern Europe.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 2013 | Open
Pre-requisite: AH1000 Intro to Western Art I and AH1020 Intro to Western Art II are strongly recommended as prerequisites.
Surveys notable developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy and in Northern Europe (late 13th- 16th centuries). Emphasizes the origins of the Renaissance and the basic stylistic evolution from Early to High Renaissance and Mannerism. Explores the ramifications of the Italian Renaissance mode as it came into contact with other historical and cultural traditions in Northern Europe.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 2018 | Open
Investigates economic and financial aspects of art over several historical periods. Examines painting, sculpture, drawing, and decorative arts as marketable products, analyzing them from the perspective of patrons, collectors, investors, and speculators. Studies artists as entrepreneurs. Assesses diverse functions and forms of influence exercised by art market specialists: critics, journalists, public officials, auctioneers, museum professionals, experts, and dealers.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 3043A | Open
This course surveys the history of Versailles during the reign of Louis XIV. Tracing the development of the architecture, gardens and interiors, we will examine how this country house developed into the seat of government and became the Baroque Palace model for monarchs throughout Europe. The contributions of architects Andr LeNotre will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to Charles LeBruns decoration of the state apartments and the creation of the iconography of Louis XIV as the Sun King. In addition to class lectures there will be visits to the Louvre, Versailles, and Vaux-le-Vicomte.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AH 3064 | Open
This course presents the basic stylistic, thematic and theoritical concerns of the major movements in Western art, from WWII to the 1980's. Investigating the diversity of artistic responses to the challenges posed by both aesthetics legacy of the past and the new political, social and economic climate of the post-war period, this course will focus on the relationship between aesthetic theory and artistic practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 1010 | Open
A studio course, which provides an introduction to basic drawing problems for the beginning student interested in developing his or hr drawing skills. Subject matter includes still life, portraiture, landscape, and the nude. Mediums introduced are pencil, charcoal, and ink wash.

Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 1015 | Open
For students with little or no previous experience in drawing or painting. First analyzes still life objects in basic plastic terms starting with value. Concentrates during each class session on a new painterly quality until a sufficient visual vocabulary is achieved so that more complicated subjects such as the nude can be approached. Work will be done in oil.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 1020 | Open
Techniques of the Masters Lectures, demonstrations, and workshops focus on materials and techniques used by artists over the centuries. Studies the historical background of techniques of drawing, painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts combined with a hands-on approach so that each student can experience the basic elements of the plastic arts. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 1032 | Open
For students who have little or no previous experience. Students learn how to see in three dimensions and work from observation. Mastery of structure and the architecture of form in space are acquired by the building up technique in clay. Work from plaster copies, nude models (male and female), and imagination are followed by an introduction to the carving technique.

There is an additional fee in this course for materials.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 1061 | Open
Pre-requisite: Students must bring their own SLR cameras, capable of shooting RAW image format.
This introductory course is an exploration of both technical and aesthetic concerns in photography. Using a digital camera, students will produce original work in response to a series of lectures, assignments, and bi-weekly critique classes. The course will cover the fundamentals of photographing with digital SLR's, and students will learn a range of digital tools including color correction, making selections, working with layers and inkjet printing. After mastering the basics, students will work towards the completion of a final project and the focus of the remaining classes will be on critiques. Students will be asked to make pictures that are challenging in both content and form and express the complex and poetic nature of the human experience.

Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Art History & Fine Arts | Course #: AR 3091 | Open
Pre-requisite: Background in painting required
TBA
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
European Studies | Course #: ES 3004 | Open
Seeks to understand how Paris elucidates the history of France by following its history from its origins to the present. The site of religious and political revolution, Paris testifies to the trials and glories of French history.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
European Studies | Course #: ES 3017 | Open
Surveys the history of urban form in the predominantly Muslim cities of the Middle East and North Africa. Students will study the relationship between urban morphology and society, practices of sacred space, and the interplay of power, belief, and architectural form. Also covered are the politics behind the forms now seen as the defining features of Islamic building and the question of the image in Islamic building. On a contemporary note, students will explore the symbolic politics of the Muslim built heritage and examine the extreme conditions facing many Middle Eastern urban populations today. Includes a Study Trip.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
European Studies | Course #: ES 3025 | Open
Offers a detailed investigation of The Divine Comedy. Traces Dante's development in several related areas (love, mysticism, allegory, poetics, politics) and his affinity with other key cultural figures (Virgil, St. Augustine, St. Bernard, St. Thomas, Boccaccio). Includes an overview of medieval history.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
European Studies | Course #: ES 3061 | Open
Presents an anthropological approach to the study of cities, providing students with theoretical and methodological tools to think critically about the meaning of urban life today. Approaches this topics from a cross-cultural perspective, with a number of readings focusing on Paris in particular. Students will undertake a Paris-based qualitative research project during the course of the semester.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: GS 2006 | Open
Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

Cross listed with CL 2006

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: GS 2010 | Open
Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes. biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

Cross listed with PY 2010

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: GS 2051 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior class standing
Introduces the study of the moral conscience, repression, and the search for happiness. Examines Freud and Marcuse's theses concerning human sexuality and human rights in terms of antagonisms between, on the one hand, erotic preference, gender identity and aggression, and on the other, socialization, morality, and so-called civilized refinement.

Cross listed with PY 2051
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Gender Studies | Course #: GS 3004 | Open
Pre-requisite: CM2004 Comparative Historical Communication
Explores what happens when dress and grooming become the basis for the modern phenomena of fashion. Studies the historical development of fashion: how fashion relates to the emergence of artistic, social, and economics forms and the ways fashion communicates ideas about status, gender, or culture. Investigates the role of media, advertising and marketing in the global fashion industry.


Crosslisted with CM 3004

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PL 1100 | Open
This course offers an overview of ancient and medieval philosophy. Beginning with the earliest Greek philosophers and ending with the late medieval founding fathers of modern scientific thought, we will read and discuss various answers these thinkers gave to questions such as: 'What is a good life?' or 'How can I reconcile my faith with what reason tells me?' Readings include Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Seneca, Plotinus, Anselm, Avicenna, Abelard, Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas and Nicolaus of Autrecourt.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Cross listed with PL 2003
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PL 2003 | Open
Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PL 2036 | Open
This course explores the impact of modern science upon philosophy through an exploration of the fundamental texts of classical metaphysics - Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Spinoza's Ethics, Leibniz's Discourse on Metaphysics and The Monadology - an examination guided by the question of what is it to act with freedom and grace in an infinite universe ruled by the laws of nature.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PL 2072 | Open
An introduction to one of the key orientations of modern philosophy: critical genealogy and its central problematic, the identity and formation of the subject. The aim of critical genealogy is to unearth the hidden and unsuspected mechanism, whether institutional or familial, which lie behind the formation of individual and social identities.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PL 3076 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR College level=Junior
Philosophical and political modernity concerns the development of rationality, freedom, and social responsibility from out of the tensions between ethics, religion, politics and the economy. With postmodernist epistemology, the so-called 'return' of religion, and economic globalization, this 'modernity' has been questioned. In this historical context the course re-elaborates the problematic of modernity through selective reading of Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 1000 | Open
This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory, biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2010 | Open
Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes. biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2013 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY 1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.
The course is an introduction to developmental psychology. From various points of view it explores the key question What is, and how can we understand, human development? It engages with central issues of developmental psychology (among others, through the work of influential psychologists such as Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, E. Erikson, Jerome Bruner, Katherine Nelson, Peggy J. Miller, and Michael Tomasello) and puts them into cross- and interdisciplinary contexts. These contexts include evolutionary theory; cultural and sociocultural, narrative, and critical psychology; history; anthropology; and philosophy. Beyond the scientific and conceptual domain, the course also investigates phenomena of human development in literature, arts, and film.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2020 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY1000 Introduction to Psychology; MA1020 Applied Statistics recommended.
Students will learn the basics of doing experimental research in psychology, including the ethics of working with human subjects, researching ideas in the scholarly literature, and designing and interpreting research findings. The principles learned here apply in many domains where research is employed to describe and understand persons and social reality.

PY2020 LAB (A or B) Required Simultaneously
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2021 | Open
Centers on the development of Freud's metapsychology. Critically examines the different formulations of the following concepts: the unconscious, the structural approach (i.e., Ego, Id, Super Ego), representation, anxiety, drive, cathexis, and the mother-infant relationship. Jung's revisions of basic analytic concepts will be examined.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2043 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY1000 Introduction to Psychology
Examines the classification systems for abnormal behavior, using the DSM IV Multiaxial diagnostic system as the base for studying currently recognized major diagnostic categories. Uses an integrative biopsychosocial model to study the etiology of various psychological disorders as well as empirically supported treatment methods.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2044 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY 1000 GE110
This course will provide an introduction to theories of personality and counseling, including psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, and family systems approaches. Theories will be examined in relation to their key concepts, view of human nature, therapeutic processes, techniques and procedures. Theories will be critiqued and compared, with special emphasis on the application of cultural and ethical issues.

Why do psychologists do what they do in psychotherapy? Most of them draw on certain concepts and theories of what it is to be a human being. Such concepts guide the therapeutic relationship, the kinds of therapeutic goals that are set, and how therapists intervene to meet these goals. This course covers a broad range of psychotherapeutic theories including but not limited to cognitive-behavioral, humanistic-existential, feminist, cultural, and family system approaches. As the field is moving towards a plurality of treatment options, the guiding framework of the course is “What treatment is the most effective for a particular individual with a specific problem under a given set of circumstance?” rather than “What is the best theory of psychotherapy?” Lectures, readings, case studies, class discussions, and experiential class exercises will be used to facilitate the exploration of the theories and techniques of major approaches to psychotherapy.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2051 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior class standing
Introduces the study of the moral conscience, repression, and the search for happiness. Examines Freud and Marcuse's theses concerning human sexuality and human rights in terms of antagonisms between, on the one hand, erotic preference, gender identity and aggression, and on the other, socialization, morality, and so-called civilized refinement.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 2075 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY 1000 - Intro to Psychology
This course introduces students to the basic aspects of human cognition. How do humans think? How do we come to know the world? The course will concentrate on the classic topics in adult cognition: pattern recognition, memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and decision-making. Special emphasis will be placed on cross-cultural aspects of cognition.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 3025 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY 1000
Provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental operations by which every human being acquires knowledge about the external world. This course provides a scientific understanding of how and why the human senses affect the way people perceive the world around them, including how perceptions can be distorted by both physical and experiential factors.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 3067 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY1000 OR College Sophomore
This course inquires into the nature and dynamics of how groups (families, institutions, countries, etc.) reconstruct and represent the past together. The problem of social memory is approached from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to explore various places of memory in Paris and examine how these historical events are constructed in the present.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PY 3068 | Open
Pre-requisite: PY 1000 GE110
This course explores autobiographical remembering as an issue of neuroscientific, cultural, and narrative psychology, while also considering it as a subject of other memory studies. It draws particular attention to how scientific, psychological, social, technological, artistic, and conceptual changes in various cultural fields have transformed the traditional idea of memory as an archive of the past.
Contact Hours: 60

Business Administration

4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 2050 | Open
The course introduces the foundations of managing creativity and innovation. The readings and discussion will focus on the concepts and frameworks for analyzing how firms create, commercialize and capture value from innovative products and services.

The aim of this course is to provide a solid grounding to students interested in managing creativity and the various aspects of the innovation process within organizations. The course is divided into two parts. The first part focuses mainly on the creativity process around three themes: What is creativity? How can creativity be stimulated? How can creative ideas be translated to innovative products and business strategies? Based on major theories in the field, we discuss whether monetary rewards enhance or undermine creativity, how multitasking or working under time pressure affects creativity, what tools we can provide to stimulate creativity, and the challenges that arise when implementing creative ideas in organizations. The second part of the course examines the organizational issues involved in innovating and in implementing innovations. These issues include management of teams and partnerships, learning within and across projects, the manager's role in funding, directing, and killing innovation projects, technological entrepreneurship, and resistance to innovation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 3012 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2020 Management and Organizational Behavior AND Junior class standing
Provides conceptual tools for the personal and professional development of future business graduates. Explores the responsibilities of managers and those engaged in business from a deontological and consequentialist perspective. Discusses the roles and responsibilities of organizations as corporate citizens. Learning methods include the use of case studies, individual reflective thinking and group discussions.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 3030 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2020, and GE 110, or equivalent courses.

Offers a systematic analysis of human resource concepts and practices designed to enhance organizational objectives and employee goals. Studies various aspects of the employment relationship: job design, staffing, employee training and development, diversity management, performance evaluation, compensation and salary administration, employee and labor relations, and collective bargaining. Examines contemporary and emerging human resource systems and models found in the U.S., Europe, and Asia.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 3075 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior or Senior class standing
Students will examine the legal process and the legal environment within which business must operate, as well as the interrelationship of government and business. Students develop an understanding of the methods by which legal decisions are formulated as they affect both individual rights and business transactions.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 3500 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2001 Financial Accounting AND Junior class standing
This course introduces students to the important managerial issues in information systems today, such as how to best use information technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness in a firm. Students will also learn how to use software to support business decision-making.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 4007 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2020 Management & Organizational Behavior AND Junior class standing
This course utilizes theoretical frameworks and models of leadership, in order to provide a foundation for the understanding of effective leadership in organizations. One focus of the course is the development of each participants leadership potential. Examples of effective organizational leadership are critically examined in case studies, which also depict leaders as role models. Current leadership topics to be covered include values and ethics, power and empowerment, management style, shared team leadership, leadership development, and leadership and change, thus providing analysis from both the macro and micro organizational levels.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Business Administration | Course #: BA 4010 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 3010 - Corporate Finance
Introduces the processes and analytical tools necessary for investment decision-making. Provides the basic skills, modes of analysis and institutional background useful to work in the investment area of finance firms or as an individual investor. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to be able to work in the field or to continue their specialization in Security Analysis or Portfolio Management.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Entrepreneurship | Course #: BA 3020 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior or Senior standing
This course provides the student with the basic understanding of small business management and the activities required for the planning and creation of new enterprises. Entrepreneurial spirit, opportunity identification, new ventures selection, ownership options, legal and tax issues will be discussed. Students apply concepts by developing a business plan. Special attention is given to entrepreneurship in an international setting.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: BA 2001 | Open
Introduces the basics of financial accounting and reporting for corporations. Studies how to measure and record accounting data and prepare financial statements. Emphasizes the effects of transactions on the financial condition of a company and explores the technical aspects of the principles underlying published financial statements.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: BA 2002 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2001 - Financial Accounting
Provides a basic introduction to the concepts of accounting for purposes of management control and management decision-making. Topics include: budgeting, budget variance analysis, break-even analysis, product cost accounting, and relevant cost analysis.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: BA 3010 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2001 Financial Accounting AND EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics. BA 2002 recommended for simultaneous registration.
Examines finance as the practical application of economic theory and accounting data in the procurement and employment of capital funds. Applies the principles of strong fiscal planning and control to asset investment, and debt and equity financing decisions. Emphasizes sound leveraging in view of the time value of money, subject to the pernicious effects of taxation and inflation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: BA 3050 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA 2001 Financial Accounting AND EC 2020 Principles of Macroeconomics
Covers topics such as foreign exchange markets, euro currency, euro bonds, international stock markets, interaction and integration of national and international money and stock markets, regulation of euro currency markets. Analyzes the uses and valuation of international financial instruments and arbitrage relationships concerning such instruments.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
International Business Administration | Course #: BA 4003 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 2010 Principles of Macroeconomics AND College Junior
This course introduces students to the international business environment domains. It covers multinational corporation strategic imperatives and organizational challenges. It also addresses the following questions: What differentiates a global industry from a domestic one? What are the sources of competitive advantage in a global context? What organizational structural alternatives are available to multinationals?

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BA 2020 | Open
Introduces various aspects of the process by which people work to achieve organizational goals, and the structure and functions of the organization in which they occur. Using lectures, discussions, and case studies, the course focuses on the problems and challenges facing international management in the fields of planning, controlling, and organizing resources, time, and personnel.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BA 3070 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA2020 Management and Organizational Behavior AND MA 1020 Applied Statistics I
Focuses on identifying and solving managerial problems that occur in the production and the delivery of goods and services. Studies project management, job design, capacity and layout planning, forecasting, inventory and quality control. Includes a mixture of mathematical models and case studies that help illustrate practical applications of the concepts.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BA 4080 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA2020 Management & Org Behavior AND BA2040 Marketing in a Global Environment AND BA3010 Corporate Finance AND College Level Senior
Concentrates on functional skills already acquired by students in the area of general management and corporate and business-level strategy. Through case studies, lecture/discussions, presentations, and the Business Strategy Game simulation, students perfect analytical skills, problem-solving ability, and the application of strategy concepts to the formation and implementation of strategy.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BA 2040 | Open
Introduces marketing concepts and their use in contemporary management. Considers how individuals and firms process information to make decisions, and how firms determine and meet customer demands and needs. Through lectures, discussions, case studies, and written analyses, the course examines the marketing function from a strategic and functional point of view. Considers marketing in the US and in an international context.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: BA 3040 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 1020 Applied Statistics I; BA 2040 Marketing in a Global Environment AND Junior class standing
Market Research is essential to any student of Marketing. This course offers a comprehensive, applied approach to understanding and designing market research. The course methodology balances the fundamental quantitative methodologies and theoretical structures with practical applications of qualitative techniques to help students become more familiar with the discipline and be able to understand research methods and design, and to be able implement their own research projects.
Contact Hours: 60

Communications

4.0 Credits
Advertising | Course #: CM 3067 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA2040 Marketing in a Global Environment
The great advertising man, Bill Bernbach, once said Everyone talks these days about what has changed. I look for what never changes. Advertising is rapidly changing, indeed, as todays mature consuming societies and new technologies force new communication challenges & solutions. Yet the principles and disciplines that lead to effective advertising have not changed. and are unlikely to in the foreseeable future. This course will be presented in the spirit of Bernbach's wisdom, i.e. developing an understanding of what never changes and applying those disciplines to our rapidly changing communications world.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 1023 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 1000 Principles of Academic Writing
This course provides a survey of the media and its function in todays society. It introduces students to the basic concepts and tools necessary to think critically about media institutions and practices. In addition to the analysis of diverse media texts, the course considers wider strategies and trends in marketing, distribution, audience formation and the consequences of globalization. By semesters end, students will understand the basic structures of todays media and be able to provide advanced analysis that weighs the social and political implications of its products.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 2001 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 1000 - Principles of Academic Writing
Concentrates on the principles of communication in public speaking. Students learn and practice strategies and techniques for effective speech preparation and delivery of informative, ceremonial, persuasive, and impromptu speeches, and panel presentations. Helps students sharpen their oral presentation skills, express their meaning clearly, and become accustomed to public speaking.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 2003 | Open
This course examines how the media industries – from movies and television to music and magazines – have been transformed by the disruptive impact of the Internet and new forms of consumer behavior. Economic terms such as “creative destruction” will help students understand how the Internet disrupted old media business models and shifted market power to consumers. Case studies include Apple’s impact on the music industry, the emergence of “streaming” services such as Netflix and Spotify, the decline of traditional print-based journalism with the emergence of online platforms, and Amazon’s transformation of the book industry.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 2051 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1000 Principles of Academic Writing AND CM1023 Intro to Media & Communication Studies
The skills learned in this course will prepare students for upper-division communication courses, and provide students with basic research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with a range of research methods (survey, interview, ethnography, discourse, and political economy).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 3004 | Open
Pre-requisite: CM2004 Comparative Historical Communication
Explores what happens when dress and grooming become the basis for the modern phenomena of fashion. Studies the historical development of fashion: how fashion relates to the emergence of artistic, social, and economics forms and the ways fashion communicates ideas about status, gender, or culture. Investigates the role of media, advertising and marketing in the global fashion industry.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 3011 | Open
This course provides an overview of political communication theories, modes, means and institutions and serves as an introduction to how communication scholars study politics and the media. We will cover prevalent political communication theories and trends, the relationship between political institutions and the press both in the US and in other countries, elections, debates, political campaigning and advertising, new media and politics, political socialization, education, politics and popular culture.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 3033 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 1000
An introduction to writing features and guide books for the travel market. Students will gain insight into the changing set of processes linked to the practice of contemporary, commodified travel, and the way space for tourist use is represented and used. Urban place-making and branding strategies are examined. Students will practice writing in a variety of travel genres.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 4015 | Open
Pre-requisite: CM1023 Intro to Media & Communication Studies AND CM2051 Communication Theory & Research Methods
This course will investigate the cultural and ideological functions of panic and the social and political uses of scandal as they circulate through contemporary media and communications. By analyzing the form and institutional contexts of selected news media, film, television and digital media, we will engage critically with debates around media effects, distribution, representation and regulation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CM 4048 | Open
Pre-requisite: BA2040 - Marketing in a Global Environment
This is the capstone course for Marketing Communications interested Seniors. It requires them to use the skills acquired from all their other Communications and Business Courses: research; management; marketing; interpersonal communications; rhetoric; etc. The course seeks to develop student capacity to analyze global communications and branding strategies of commercial companies and how they manage their brands. They learn the entire process of how brands are built and marketed and how corporations use the tools of advertising, promotion, packaging, public relations, events, sponsorships, internal communications and more to create a desired image and identity for their brands. This course is designed to give students an understanding of how strategic brand marketing is actually practiced today. As such, it employs the Harvard Business School Case Study method and teamwork throughout.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Global Communication | Course #: CM 2004 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1000 or EN1010 or EN2020
This course provides historical background to understand how contemporary communication practices and technologies have developed and are in the process of developing and reflects on what communication has been in different human societies across time and place. It considers oral and literate cultures, the development of writing systems, of printing, and different cultural values assigned to the image. The parallel rise of mass media and modern western cultural and political forms and the manipulation and interplay of the properties and qualities conveyed by speech, sight, and sound are studied with reference tot he printed book, newspapers, photography, radio, cinema, television, new media.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Global Communication | Course #: CM 2006 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1000 Principles of Academic Writing
What is globalization? Why study the media? What is the relationship between the media and globalization? What are the consequences of media globalization on our lives and identities? This course critically explores these questions ad challenging issues that confront us today. Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres--technological, economic, political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. Yet much of the current debates of globalization tend to be concerned with "out there" macro-processes, rather than what is happening "in-here," in the micro-processes of our lives. This course explores both the macro and the micro. It encourages students to develop an enlarged way of thinking--challenging existing paradigms and providing comparative perspectives.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
2.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CM 1850 | Open
This workshop trains students in magazine writing and production through hands-on experience working on a high-quality student magazine, the Peacock. Students participate in a newsroom setting in a variety of roles -- from writing and editing to pagination and layout -- to produce the Peacock in both print and online versions. Students will learn researching and writing techniques as well as how to interview and source stories for magazines. They will gain pre-professional experience preparing them for entry-level positions in magazine journalism – whether print publications or online magazines. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CM 1851 | Open
This workshop trains students in online news writing and website curation through hands-on experience working on a news site in the style of Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, Daily Beast and similar sites. Students will participate in a variety of roles -- from editing and assigning to writing in specialized areas – to manage and curate an online news site in real time. Students will gain practical skills using different tools, including social media, while working a real digital newsroom setting. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in digital journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CM 1852 | Open
This hands-on workshop trains students in video journalism in a real-time newsroom and production studio setting. Students will gain skills working with video production equipment and editing tools including Final Cut Pro. Students will contribute video journalism pieces to “PTV”, the video platform linked to the student media website where their video work contributes to the content mix of news pieces, video work, and magazine stories. Students will produce short video stories, narratives and interviews for the site. They will edit video pieces, post on YouTube, and use social media to promote their stories. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in video journalism and for more advanced AUP courses in video and broadcast journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree
Contact Hours: 30
4.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CM 2011 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1000 - Principles of Academic Writing
Is journalism a science or an art? What is news any way? Where do you find it? The class begins with some of the basic conceptions of the profession: accuracy, fairness and objectivity. We will look at the strong points and the handicaps of each. We will learn to sift through the facts to make a story intelligible to an identifiable audience. The course will be based on print journalism. This implies writing. We will study style and tone, analyze possible sources, define angles and learn to write a hard news story.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Rhetoric | Course #: CM 3052 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1000 - Principles of Academic Writing
Studies rhetoric as a historical phenomenon and as a practical reality. Considers how words and images are used to convince and persuade individuals of positions, arguments or actions to undertake, with particular attention to advertising, politics and culture. Studies the use of reason, emotion, and commonplaces, and compares visual and verbal techniques of persuasion.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Rhetoric | Course #: CM 3055 | Open
Pre-requisite: CM2051 Communication Theory & Research Methods OR Art History major
This course will examine the hows and whys by which visual cultural products circulate, attempt to persuade audiences, and have effects in contemporary media cultures. These include: film, television, advertising, public spaces, photojournalism, and new media. The course answers the question: How do images, audio-visual products, and their place in media cultures shape us as individuals, groups, or nations?
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: CM 1019 | Open
The course is a basic primer on digital video and film making. It introduces students to digital video procedures, equipment, techniques and options, including use of cameras and familiarity with editing systems. Students will become proficient in the use of digital video technology and see how to prepare program material for the web, broadcast and other outlets.

Crosslisted as FM 1019
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Video Production | Course #: CM 3027 | Open
Pre-requisite: CM1023 AND CM2011
Gives students a basic overview of the process of producing audiovisual material for non-fiction radio and television, with an emphasis on broadcast news and documentaries; explores the various stages of news production, from the development of a story concept to completion of the finished program. The goal is to enable the student to achieve an understanding of the basic techniques, equipment and the role of key personnel in a professional news environment.

Students who take this course may not take CM/FM 1019 Principles of Video Production.

Contact Hours: 60
2.0 Credits
Web | Course #: CM 1005 | Open
Introduces Web publishing in 12 sessions. Students will learn the basics of HTML and the use of at least one HTML editor. Site publishing including file structures, image and sound files will be covered.
Contact Hours: 30
4.0 Credits
Web | Course #: CM 1500 | Open
In this digital tools training course, students will learn skills and gain hands-on experience with a range of digital publishing tools to build and curate a web platform with compelling, sharable content. They will become familiar with key storytelling platforms and technologies including Wordpress, Tumblr, Vine, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. They will acquire hands-on experience with essential software including Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator, Encoder, and Final Cut Pro; and they will learn to manipulate HTML and CSS with a basic Integrated Design Environment. In this highly hands-on course, students will learn basic web design and work collaboratively to create and launch a dynamic new digital brand online.
Contact Hours: 60

Comparative Literature and English

4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 1025 | Open
Considers closely three moments when the practice of writing changed radically in response to historical and cultural processes, from Ancient Greece to 1800 (specific contents change each year). Investigates the forces that inform creative imagination and cultural production. Places those moments and those forces within a geographical and historical map of literary production, and introduces the tools of literary analysis.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 2006 | Open
Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 2051 | Open
Begins with Old English literary texts, then examines selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the conventions of Middle English drama and lyrics, earlier Renaissance styles of lyric poetry (Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney), and then Shakespeare's sonnets and a major Shakespeare play. Reviews the dominant styles of Metaphysical and Cavalier poetry (Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Crashaw, Suckling, Waller, Milton).
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 2094 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is taught in French. FR 2100
Ce cours introduira les etudiants aux techniques et aux problematiques de la traduction litteraire par le cas particulier des traductions en anglais de romans contemporains ecrits en francais. La traduction sera discutee comme un transfert culturel : en observant comment des ecrivains representatifs (Houellebecq, Djebar, Gavalda…) ont ete recus aux USA, et en GB, et en faisant le commentaire de trois traductions recentes. L’essentiel du cours sera consacre a l’experience collective et individuelle de la traduction d’un livre non encore traduit.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 3025 | Open
Offers a detailed investigation of The Divine Comedy. Traces Dante's development in several related areas (love, mysticism, allegory, poetics, politics) and his affinity with other key cultural figures (Virgil, St. Augustine, St. Bernard, St. Thomas, Boccaccio). Includes an overview of medieval history.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 3035 | Open
This course offers close engagement with recently translated fiction and poetry from around the globe. In addition to reading great contemporary writing, students are introduced to todays new media landscape, which has taken on an increasingly important role in the promotion and evaluation of global literature. Units on the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 3038 | Open
Considers a selection of Shakespeare's plays in the context of the dramatist's explorations of the possibilities of theatricality. Examines how theater is represented in his work and how his work lends itself to production in theater and film today. Students view video versions, visit Paris theaters, and travel to London and Stratford-on-Avon to see the Royal Shakespeare Company in performance.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 3059 | Open
Studies the literary works, poetic aspirations and legal trials of Flaubert and Baudelaire, while tracing their tremendous influence on 19th-century French literature and their contribution to the emergence of modernity. Readings include Madame Bovary, Trois contes, Bouvard et Pecuchet, and Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal among other works, as well as a range of critical and philosophical commentaries.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 4000 | Open
Have you yearned to start a novel, a collection of related short stories or narrative essays, a memoir, or a series of poems? This cross-genre, seminar-style course is designed for students who want to pursue larger, more advanced creative writing projects. Students will submit project proposals for discussion and approval, and then present significant installments of writing at regular intervals during the semester. Revisions will be required along with student-professor individual conferences. Readings will be used as guiding examples, and required reaction papers will be tailored to individual projects.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: CL 4091 | Open
Changes every year, offering the chance to study literature from within different perspectives and across different periods. Studies literature as it is actively involved with other artistic practices, such as painting or music, and engaged with other disciplines, such as science or philosophy or cultural studies or gender studies. Recent examples include: Literature and Science, Literature and Politics.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Comparative Literature | Course #: FR 3059 | Open
Studies the literary works, poetic aspirations and legal trials of Flaubert and Baudelaire, while tracing their tremendous influence on 19th-century French literature and their contribution to the emergence of modernity. Readings include Madame Bovary, Trois contes, Bouvard et Pecuchet, and Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal among other works, as well as a range of critical and philosophical commentaries.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: CL 2028 | Open
In Art of Screenwriting students consider the elements necessary for successful screenwriting practices, with close attention to the theory of screenwriting as influenced by other arts. In particular, a close emphasis of the course is on the art of narrative and the central role played by adaptation of novels in screenwriting practice. Character development, structure, dialogue and conflict are analyzed through exemplary scripting such as in the works of Jane Campion, Roman Polanski and others. The course culminates in a hands-on guided approach to scriptwriting by students.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: CL 2100 | Open
In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: CL 3300 | Open
This workshop gives students the opportunity to explore through reading, research, and writing assignments an array of creative nonfiction forms, including memoir, travel writing, food and nature writing, and social essays. Students share their writing for peer critique in a supportive and constructive workshop environment. Creative nonfiction includes guest speakers and field exercises in Paris. Conferences and a final portfolio are required.
Contact Hours: 60

Computer Science, Mathematics & Science

2.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 1005 | Open
Introduces Web publishing in 12 sessions. Students will learn the basics of HTML and the use of at least one HTML editor. Site publishing including file structures, image and sound files will be covered.

Cross listed as CM 1005
Contact Hours: 30
5.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 1040 | Open
Introduces the field of computer science and the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective using the programming language Java. Starts with practical problem-solving and leads to the study and analysis of simple algorithms, data types, control structures, and use of simple data structures such as arrays and strings.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 2071 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS1040 Introduction to Computer Programming I
Uses predefined classes and class libraries to introduce standard data structures (stacks, queues, sets, trees, and graphs). Studies and implements algorithms for string-searching, sorting, trees and graph traversals. Introduces algorithm complexity analysis and big-Oh (O,,) notation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 3015 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS1050 AND MA1040
The course is an introduction to digital logic and computer organization and architecture. It examines the internal structure and functioning of a modern computer system, emphasizing both the fundamental principles and the role of performance in computer design. The topics covered are: data representation, digital logic, the instruction-set architecture, machine and assembly language programming, micro programming, storage and access techniques, input and output.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 3053 | Open
Covers methods and tools associated with the entire software life cycle: requirement management, testing and profiling, deployment, change and configuration management, quality management, project management and security. Special emphases are given to object-oriented software analysis and design as a foundation to Model-driven architecture (MDA). Automated and semi-automated tools that support these procedures will also be examined.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 3068 | Open
Introduces databases from the programmer's perspective. IT and CS students have common lectures but different projects. IT students learn the fundamentals of database design, SQL, and how to integrate a database into applications. CS students learn the fundamentals of database design, application integration, query motors, and space management.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Environmental Science | Course #: SC 1040 | Open
Pre-requisite: GE 1020 GE120 OR MA 1005 OR MA 1010 OR MA 1020 OR MA 1030 OR MA 1005 GE120 OR M A1010 GE120 OR MA 1020 GE120 OR MA 1030 GE120 OR ELECMA-15 OR ELECMA-20 OR ELECMA-30
This is a conceptual physics course for non-scientists. It discusses the principles of physics involved in the production, distribution and consumption of energy using various types of fuel. It also considers the environmental issues related to the use of fossil fuels from a scientific viewpoint. Renewable sources of energy and the economic and political implications of their development as well as ways of conserving energy are also discussed. Must take lab. Not open to students with credit in or concurrent enrollment in PH 1000.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Environmental Science | Course #: SC 1050 | Open
Pre-requisite: GE1020 OR MA1005 OR MA1010
This course introduces the concepts of Climate and Weather, and the physical and chemical structure of the atmosphere at equilibrium and how energy and mass flow through the atmosphere as it is displaced from this state. Students will learn about agents that affect weather - radiation, moisture, greenhouse gases, etc., and then critically examine the findings of the Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Must take SC1050 LAB (A or B) Simultaneously
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Environmental Science | Course #: SC 2010 | Open
Pre-requisite: 4 Credits From Range [SC1010GE130 To SC1070GE130] AND MA1020 OR MA1030
This course will focus on specific cases of anthropogenic environmental emergencies such as: the ozone hole, global warming or fresh water resource depletion. Students will investigate specific cases discussed in recent peer-reviewed scientific articles. Emphasis will be placed on the physical processes involved and possible solutions.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 1005 | Open
Pre-requisite: Not open to students who have taken MA1010 Applied Finite Mathematics or above.
A General Education course designed for students majoring in subjects not requiring math skills, and those who dislike math. Projects are developed from a range of everyday situations: banking, the stock market, gambling, and even art. Meeting alternately in the classroom and the computer lab to develop mathematical models, students will develop quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 1020 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 1001 Algebra OR MA 1005 Math for Life OR MA 1010 Applied Finite Mathematics
Introduces the tools of statistical analysis. Combines theory with extensive data collection and computer-assisted laboratory work. Develops an attitude of mind accepting uncertainty and variability as part of problem analysis and decision-making. Topics include: exploratory data analysis and data transformation, hypothesis-testing and the analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression with residual and influence analyses.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 1025 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 0900 or ELECMA-15 or ELECMA-30 OR MA 1001
Functions Modeling Change provides the algebraic and geometric skills needed to succeed in a Calculus course. The central topic is functions (in particular linear, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic), function notation and graphs, transformations, composition and inverses. Students also work with computers building mathematical models based on these functions, and implemented using graphing calculators, mathematical software and Excel.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 1030 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA1002 Precalculus OR MA1010 Applied Finite Mathematics
Introduces differential and integral calculus. Develops the concepts of calculus as applied to polynomials, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Topics include: limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications to extrema and graphing; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications; logarithmic and exponential functions, growth and decay; partial derivatives. Appropriate for students in the biological, management, computer and social sciences.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 2007 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 1010 or 4 Credits From Range MA 1010 - MA 2041 OR MA 1010 GE 120.
This course is intended to study the computational methodologies of Linear Programming and its variants and extensions, from the Transportation Problem and the Assignment Model to Network optimisation. Various types of applications from the fields of Environmental Science (for the determination of the efficient use of scarce resources), Economics, Finance, Advertising... will be investigated and the methods by which useful results are obtainable - together with the reasoning behind the use of these methods - will be discussed.
Both the mathematical aspects and the use of a software package will be highlighted, each approach reinforcing the other. All classes will be held in the computer lab so as to enhance understanding, favour an interactive approach and develop new insights.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 2030 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA1030 Calculus I
The continuation of MA1030, Calculus I. This course is appropriate for economics, mathematics, business and computer science majors and minors. Topics include: infinite series and applications; differential equations of first and second order and applications, functions of several variables, partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Includes the use of Mathematica.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Science | Course #: SC 1091 | Open
Pre-requisite: GE 1020 GE120 OR MA 1005 OR MA 1010 OR MA 1020 OR MA 1030 OR MA 1005 GE120 OR MA 1010 GE120 OR MA 1020 GE120 OR MA 1030 GE120
How did we get here? Why do we look the way we do? Are we alone in the universe? How and when did life begin? Why are there so many different species of plants and animals on the planet today, and how did humans become so dominant? Scientists have made enormous headway in mapping the evolution of life on Earth, from single-celled organisms as early as 4.1 billion years ago to the huge diversity of organisms that currently roam our planet. The aim of this course is to explore this long and exciting history of life (and death). We will meet many life forms that have long since gone extinct, such as the dinosaurs, and uncover the possible reasons for their demise. As we go, we will learn about the underlying mechanisms that drive the evolutionary process, ultimately generating the diversity that we see today. The final section of the course will focus on human evolution – from our roots in the African plains several million years ago to our recent rise to the top of the food chain. We will end by speculating on what is to come – What will we look like in the future? Will our brains get bigger or smaller? Can we control the evolutionary process?

Requires enrollment in concurrent LAB section:
SC 1091 LLAB
Contact Hours: 60

Economics

4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 2003 | Open
Studies the main characteristics of the 'New Economy' and explores the existing linkages between the digital media, technological innovation and the network economy in relation to the market in a national and international context.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 2010 | Open
Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 2020 | Open
Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 3010 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics AND EC2020 Principles of Macroeconomics AND MA1030 Calculus I
Uses the concepts of formal economic analysis to study topics ranging from the theory of consumer behavior to the formation of market demand, economics of the firm, pricing under competition and monopoly, income distribution, general equilibrium, and welfare economics. Emphasizes the application of various theoretical constructs in the analysis and interpretation of problems encountered in the real world.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 3061 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics AND EC2020 Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduces game theory as used in many different disciplines, with an emphasis on economics. The course will focus on finding Nash equilibrium of non-cooperative games. The reasonableness of various kinds of equilibria will also be discussed, as well as departures from the usual assumptions of rational behavior. Students will describe a situation as a game and solve for its equilibria.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 3073 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics AND EC2020 Principles of Macroeconomics
Studies the economic functions and structures of financial asset markets, financial intermediaries, and money. It also presents the role of the central bank in macroeconomic performance of open economies.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 3086 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics AND EC2020 Principles of Macroeconomics AND MA1020 Applied Statistics I
Includes an introduction to the linear regression model; a review of elementary statistics; the two-variable regression model in detail; the multiple regression model, its use, and problems arising from violations of its underlying assumptions; and an introduction to simultaneous-equation models.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 3091 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 AND EC2020
Courses on different and emerging topics in the discipline, enriching the present course offerings. These classes are taught by permanent or visiting faculty.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
International Economics | Course #: EC 2030 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC2010 Principles of Microeconomics AND EC2020 Principles of Marcoeconomics
Deals with the mechanisms of international trade and finance. Topics covered include the theory of trade, commercial policy, the international monetary system, the balance of payments adjustments process, regional economic integration, and the role of international organizations in international economic relations.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60

English Literature & Writing

4.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 2051 | Open
Begins with Old English literary texts, then examines selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the conventions of Middle English drama and lyrics, earlier Renaissance styles of lyric poetry (Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney), and then Shakespeare's sonnets and a major Shakespeare play. Reviews the dominant styles of Metaphysical and Cavalier poetry (Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Crashaw, Suckling, Waller, Milton).
Contact Hours: 60
6.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 0085 | Open
Prepares students to become proficient writers of academic English. Reviews grammar in the context of writing. Students learn the essential steps of writing, such as planning, organization, mechanics, word choice, style, and editing.
Although this course carries 6 credits, it does not fulfill the University's English requirement.
Contact Hours: 90
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 0095 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN0085 Intensive Writing
Helps students develop greater sophistication, nuance, and style in writing academic papers in English. Allows students to practice all the phases of preparing and producing quality academic writing, including critical thinking, essay planning, outlining and organization, proofreading, editing, and rewriting.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 1000 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 0095 - Advanced Intensive Writing
Emphasizes the stages required to produce a polished, articulate essay by practicing the necessary components of excellent academic writing: sharpening critical thinking skills, organizing ideas, choosing appropriate and dynamic words, varying prose style, editing, refining, and proofreading.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 1010 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 1000 - Principles of Academic Writing
Taught through thematically-linked works of literature from the Ancient world to the present day. Stresses expository writing, accurate expression, and logical organization of ideas in academic writing. Recent themes include: Childhood, Friendship from Aristotle to Derrida, Social Organization and Alienation, Monstrosity, and Music and Literature.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 2020 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN1010 College Writing
A series of topic-centered courses refining the skills of academic essay writing, studying a wide range of ideas as expressed in diverse literary genres and periods. Introduces the analysis of literary texts and gives training in the writing of critical essays and research papers. Recent topics include: Utopia and Anti-Utopia, City as Metaphor, Portraits of Women, Culture Conflict, and Labyrinths.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 2100 | Open
In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 3300 | Open
This workshop gives students the opportunity to explore through reading, research, and writing assignments an array of creative nonfiction forms, including memoir, travel writing, food and nature writing, and social essays. Students share their writing for peer critique in a supportive and constructive workshop environment. Creative nonfiction includes guest speakers and field exercises in Paris. Conferences and a final portfolio are required.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Writing | Course #: EN 4000 | Open
Have you yearned to start a novel, a collection of related short stories or narrative essays, a memoir, or a series of poems? This cross-genre, seminar-style course is designed for students who want to pursue larger, more advanced creative writing projects. Students will submit project proposals for discussion and approval, and then present significant installments of writing at regular intervals during the semester. Revisions will be required along with student-professor individual conferences. Readings will be used as guiding examples, and required reaction papers will be tailored to individual projects.
Contact Hours: 60

Film Studies

4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 1010 | Open
Students begin with an analysis of basic elements of film language (signs, codes, syntax). They study the technology, economics and politics of the film industry as it has developed in the United States and Europe. In the latter half of the course they will investigate the impact of television, video, computers and digital media in the history of cinema.


This course is a complex introduction to the ever-evolving art form that is cinema. We will use lecture, screenings, readings and presentations to introduce the ways cinema works to make meaning. With a firm grounding in history, students will screen films and examine the artists who made them along with the technological, economic and political aspects of the film industry that shaped their creation and reception. In studying the dynamic evolution, we will also investigate the impact of new technological and cultural expectations on the evolving art form.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 1019 | Open
The course is a basic primer on digital video and film making. It introduces students to digital video procedures, equipment, techniques and options, including use of cameras and familiarity with editing systems. Students will become proficient in the use of digital video technology and see how to prepare program material for the web, broadcast and other outlets.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2028 | Open
In Art of Screenwriting students consider the elements necessary for successful screenwriting practices, with close attention to the theory of screenwriting as influenced by other arts. In particular, a close emphasis of the course is on the art of narrative and the central role played by adaptation of novels in screenwriting practice. Character development, structure, dialogue and conflict are analyzed through exemplary scripting such as in the works of Jane Campion, Roman Polanski and others. The course culminates in a hands-on guided approach to scriptwriting by students.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2075 | Open
Studies film history, aesthetics, and techniques of film analysis. Illustrates the basic theories of film-making with specific films of important directors such as Griffith, Einstein, Stroheim, Chaplin, Keaton, Murnau, Sternberg, Lubitsch, Renoir, Hawks, Ford, Welles, and Sturges.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2083 | Open
Who could have imagined the innovative and prolonged career of Martin Scorsese, especially when weighed against the parsimonious production of one of Scorsese’s major influences, Stanley Kubrick? This course focuses on these two maverick New York directors, Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorsese; one starting out in the last years of the American studio system, the other part of the American New Wave. Rather than a straightforward focus on one of these directors and then the other, this course is shaped according to central themes which resonate with both directors: war, religion and the role of urban settings on filmmaking practice, along with other themes. Students do, however, begin with early Kubrick films such as Killer’s Kiss and The Killing, in order to analyze how the early films can be shown to contain the seeds of his later works and to understand his mastery of a wide range of genres from black comedy with Dr. Strangelove to science fiction with 2001. Students also explore the impact of New York on Scorsese’s films such as Mean Streets and Taxi Driver. They analyze his indebtedness to cinema tradition and the influence of this tradition on his cinéphile tendencies with films such as Goodfellas and The Departed. We analyze the status of both directors as auteur directors and explore the specificities of their directing techniques. We learn from directors the difficulties of producing ‘auteur’ films from within the American studio system.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2090 | Open
Studies America's cinematic myth: Film Noir, a pessimistic style appearing in Hollywood in the 1940s. Films include: The Maltese Falcon, Shadow of a Doubt, The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Touch of Evil, Out of the Past, The Woman in the Window, Murder My Sweet, Force of Evil, Pickup on South Street, and Kiss Me Deadly.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2091-6WK | Open
Courses on different topics in the discipline, enriching the present course offerings. These classes are taught by permanent or visiting faculty. Topics vary each semester.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 2097 | Open
This course examines the intricate relationship existing between cinema and the body. How is cinematographic art able to represent the creative faculties but also the dark sides of the body : its gestures, desires, needs and pulsions (in sexuality and gender identity) ? How can it account for the cognitive, cultural, political and technological revolutions associated with the body throughout European history (such as the Body Politics or the Technological Body) ? Structured around screenings and classroom lectures, the course addresses these questions by introducing the students to elements of film studies and Body Theory as well as locating each of the screened films in their historical and cultural contexts. The aim of the course is for students to develop an informed appreciation of the issues at stake in the variety of cinematographic representations of the body.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 3039 | Open
Pre-requisite: 4 Credits From Range FM 1000 to FM 2098
This course aims to teach the fundamentals of directing - story boarding, preparation of a shooting script, choice of camera angles and lenses, etc. - and show the relationship between the technical and creative aspects of film making. Students will analyze direction in films and work as small production teams on their own short films to illustrate the "how and why" of film technique's influence on story-telling and character portrayal.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 3073 | Open
Studies post-1945 Japanese cinema, including the Kurosawa epics (Seven Samurai, Rashomon, Ran, Dream). Other masters include Ozu, Mizoguchi and Oshima. Examines Indian cinema and Satyajit Ray, and his masterful Apu trilogy. Concentrates on new Asian film, with works by Chinese (including Hong Kong and Taiwan) directors such as Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Wong Kar-Wai, Tsai Ming Liang, and Ang Lee.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 3080 | Open
We examine Brecht's application of his theories and plays to his work in German and Hollywood cinema. We consider his collaborations with Fritz Lang, Charles Laughton, G.W. Pabst, Lotte Eisner and others. We also analyze his influence on later filmmakers such as Jean-Luc Godard, Hans Jurgen Syberberg and R.W. Fassbinder and his contributions to film theory.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Film Studies | Course #: FM 3087 | Open
Pre-requisite: Taught in French. Prerequisites: FR 1200 or FR 2100 or FR 2200
Studies the numerous facets, whether real of imaginary, of the close relationship between Paris and cinema. Analyzes films made by famous directors such as Clair, Carne, Godard, Malle, Rohmer, Polanski, Collard, Kassovitz, and others.

Cross listed as FR 3087
Contact Hours: 60

History

4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 1002 | Open
Continues History 1001, from the Renaissance and the Reformation through commercialism, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the industrial and social revolutions of the 19th century to nationalism and socialism in the contemporary Western world.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 2001 | Open
Examines French history between 1770 and 1815: the rise of the modern monarchical state, population growth and increased commercial wealth calling for flexibility and innovation, new values of the Enlightenment urging a rethinking of traditional beliefs and practices, war and bankruptcy precipitating revolution and bringing to power men such as Robespierre and Napoleon.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 2030 | Open
What role should courts play in shaping society, both domestically and internationally? This course will explore two ideas of courts both in theory and in practice. The first part of the course will examine and clarify the historical development of the two typologies, exploring the arguments and rationales of each approach to the role courts play. The second part of the course will consider court decisions to explore several modern courts, both domestic and international.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 2091 | Open
This course surveys major themes in the ancient (pre-Islamic) and medieval history of the Middle East. It is organized around two parts.

The first surveys successive civilizations and empires that rose in the region or invaded and dominated it, from the Egyptians, the Hittites, the Assyrians, to the Babylonians, the Persians, the Greeks and the Romans/Byzantines. The birth of Judaism and Christianity is presented in this part.

The Second covers the rise of Islam, its expansion and the Caliphate it established from the 7th to the late 13th century, when the Mongol seized Bagdad.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 3004 | Open
Seeks to understand how Paris elucidates the history of France by following its history from its origins to the present. The site of religious and political revolution, Paris testifies to the trials and glories of French history. 4 Credits. Offered periodically.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 3054 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior class standing
Examines the creation of the Bismarckian state, the origins of World War I and World War II, and the creation of a united Europe in the post-war period. Investigates the efforts of the European state system to adapt to the challenges of nationalism and globalization.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Cross listed with PO 3054
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HI 3062 | Open
The rise of the Atlantic world after 1500 generated cities of unrivaled cultural, economic and political power. Replacing the previously dominant form of the Mediterranean city-state, London, Paris and Madrid became the centers of an Atlantic world which formed the core of the first world system. This course will examine the rise of these cities from the perspective of state building, urban culture, urban revolt, the growth of the Atlantic economy and the responses to these processes through urban planning and city government.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: PO 3062 | Open
The rise of the Atlantic world after 1500 generated cities of unrivaled cultural, economic and political power. Replacing the previously dominant form of the Mediterranean city-state, London, Paris and Madrid became the centers of an Atlantic world which formed the core of the first world system. This course will examine the rise of these cities from the perspective of state building, urban culture, urban revolt, the growth of the Atlantic economy and the responses to these processes through urban planning and city government.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Law & Society | Course #: LW 2030 | Open
What role should courts play in shaping society, both domestically and internationally? This course will explore two ideas of courts both in theory and in practice. The first part of the course will examine and clarify the historical development of the two typologies, exploring the arguments and rationales of each approach to the role courts play. The second part of the course will consider court decisions to explore several modern courts, both domestic and international.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Cross listed with HI 2030
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Law & Society | Course #: LW 3041 | Open
Pre-requisite: College Junior or Senior
International human rights law established the norms, jurisprudence and legal infrastructure necessary to promote the implementation of international human rights standards. This course introduces key substantive and institutional issues and explores the establishment of standards, international human rights treaties, their implementation mechanisms and the expanding body of jurisprudence that make up this discipline at the crossroads of law and development.


*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Law & Society | Course #: LW 3061 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR College Level Junior or Senior
Covers the formal structure of the international legal order; sources, uses and dynamics of law in international relations; use of force, war crimes; the status and functions of states, governments, international organizations, companies, and individuals; law of the sea, environment, jurisdiction, aliens, human rights, the diplomatic process and its protection, and treaties. Discusses theory and future directions of international law.
Contact Hours: 60

International Comparative Politics

4.0 Credits
Development and Human Rights | Course #: PO 3029 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO 1011 or College Level=Junior
This seminar is designed to introduce students to modern Southeast Asian politics, particularly the historical foundations for current events. Students will explore the complexities of the continental and island states of this region with emphasis on the legacy of colonialism and war, ASEAN, the burgeoning regional economy, terrorism and democratic governance.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Development and Human Rights | Course #: PO 3041 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR Junior or Senior class standing
International human rights law established the norms, jurisprudence and legal infrastructure necessary to promote the implementation of international human rights standards. This course introduces key substantive and institutional issues and explores the establishment of standards, international human rights treaties, their implementation mechanisms and the expanding body of jurisprudence that make up this discipline at the crossroads of law and development.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Middle East Studies | Course #: ME 2030 | Open
The “Middle East” and the “West” (as two political/cultural entities) have been involved in a long history of conflicts, concurrence, hegemony, and fascination. The course will explore the different aspects of the contemporary Middle East/West relation, and will explain its origins and historical evolution.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics | Course #: PO 1011 | Open
What is politics - to quest for the common good or who gets what, when, and how? We study what defines politics in the modern age: states and nations in the international system, collective action and representation in mass societies, trajectories of democracy and dictatorship, politics and development in the context of capitalism. The course will introduce the student to the concerns, the language and the methods of Political Science.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics | Course #: PO 2003 | Open
Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? how are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics | Course #: PO 2050 | Open
This course examines the nature of knowledge claims in political science: how we know what we know and how certain we are. Research schools, the nature of description and explanation in political science, and basis issues of quantitative analysis will form the core elements of this course, while substantive themes may vary each year.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Politics | Course #: PO 3066 | Open
Pre-requisite: College Level=Junior OR 4 Credits From Range [PO1006GE110 To PO3091]
“billionaireswatch.org” is combining a research seminar with watchdog activism, exploring the roles of billionaires in politics in order to develop a framework with which to scrutinize their influence. We study the role of private wealth in public policy-making and explore how a watchdog website may lead to greater transparency and accountability.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 2015 | Open
This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics, focusing on political behavior and the structures and practices that political systems have in common and those that distinguish them. We study different forms of democratic and authoritarian rule, state-society relationships, and key issues of political economy like development and welfare states. While the emphasis is on domestic features, we also analyze the impacts of globalization on national politics.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 2031 | Open
This course analyses the basic setting, structure and dynamics of world politics with emphasis on current global problems, practices and processes. In doing so, it introduces the major theoretical approaches to international politics, and uses theory as a methodological tool for analyzing sources of change and causes of conflict and/or cooperation in the global arena.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 2091 | Open
Only six or seven years ago, few would have considered the Arctic as more than a marginal issue in global affairs. A scholar specializing in the Arctic proposing a paper at a mainstream conference on international relations would have seemed as irrelevant as a specialist of Jack London showing up uninvited at a conference devoted to Nabokov, Virginia Woolfe and Alain Robbe-Grillet and asking for the microphone. The idea that the Arctic Ocean could become the « Mediterranean » of the future, a concept proposed in the early 1900s by Canadian geographer of Icelandic descent Vilhalmur Stefansson, even now still seems childish to many reasonable scholars.

Yet, just as the late 1980s suddenly discovered the « dragons » and « tigers » of the China seas (emerging regional powers such as Korea, Taiwan, or Singapore), several drastic changes have forced analysts, decision makers, media and increasingly greater portions of the general public to discover the importance of the polar and sub-Arctic regions because of the intense new challenges revealed by the new rush towards the Arctic (and soon to the Antarctic). The dangers of confrontation (even war), and the risks of competition or opportunities for cooperation in fields such as military or economic strategy, science and environmental politics (especially around the issues involving global warming), sustainable or non-sustainable development, human rights, culture and international law are such that indeed, the circumpolar regions, but also the "Near Arctic" (cities such as Oslo, Helsinki, Saint Petersburg, Vladivotok, Hokkaido, Vancouver or Seattle and their respective regions which are the economic gateways to the Far North and its decision centers) are increasingly recognized as a new Middle East.

The course will be tied in with a field trip to an Arctic region of Europe during the Fall break.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 2091B | Open
The United States is in the midst of a presidential election this year. This course will analyze American presidential elections. Topics to be considered will include: the nature of the American presidency, the electoral system, electoral sociology and voting behavior, media techniques, the role of money and campaign finance laws, political journalism, political discourse, the political party system, the influence of state and local politics, the impact of the economy and social issues, the role of foreign policy and other issue areas. All of these topics will be considered in an investigation of campaign strategies. We will look at the history of presidential elections and consider their future evolution.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 3052 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR Junior or Senior class standing
Examines the changing context of post-Cold War conflict and how contemporary disputes may be resolved. Analyzes the nature of intervention strategies and their consequences; negotiation and mediation techniques, as well as other political instruments to deal with conflict resolution; the institutions and regimes of security and conflict management, plus the problems related to peace and state building.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 3054 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior class standing
Examines the creation of the Bismarckian state, the origins of World War I and World War II, and the creation of a united Europe in the post-war period. Investigates the efforts of the European state system to adapt to the challenges of nationalism and globalization.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Cross listed with HI 3054
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 3061 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR Junior or Senior class standing
Covers the formal structure of the international legal order; sources, uses and dynamics of law in international relations; use of force, war crimes; the status and functions of states, governments, international organizations, companies, and individuals; law of the sea, environment, jurisdiction, aliens, human rights, the diplomatic process and its protection, and treaties. Discusses theory and future directions of international law.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Crosslisted.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
World Politics | Course #: PO 3076 | Open
Pre-requisite: PO1011 Foundations of Modern Politics OR Junior class standing
Philosophical and political modernity concerns the development of rationality, freedom, and social responsibility from out of the tensions between ethics, religion, politics and the economy. With postmodernist epistemology, the so-called 'return' of religion, and economic globalization, this modernity has been questioned. In this historical context the course re-elaborates the problematic of modernity through selective reading of Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course

Cross listed with PL 3076
Contact Hours: 60

Language

4.0 Credits
Arabic Language | Course #: AB 1010 | Open
This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Arabic Language | Course #: AB 1030 | Open
Pre-requisite: AB 1020 - Elementary Arabic II
After studying the principles of morphological derivation which makes the students able to structure their understanding of the vocabulary production system, the course focuses on producing small texts expressing the students opinion and description of the material seen during the sessions. AB 1030 gives the opportunity to go beyond simple contact and to interact in Arabic within the fields covered by the different documents. The field covered by the didactic documents broadens out to short authentic texts, short articles and literary production, as well as authentic documents such as letters, cards, advertising, announcements.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 1100 | Open
This course is an introduction to French and is intended to help students acquire the basic elements of spoken and written French. Students will learn how to express themselves in everyday life situations. The students basic needs for linguistic and cultural information will be the main focus of this course. In class, work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the city of Paris.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 1200 | Open
Pre-requisite: FR1100 OR FR1025 OR FR125
This course is a second semester Elementary French course, with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding the culture of France and the Francophone world. This course will enable students to improve their comprehension skills through the use of authentic audio and video material and to acquire vocabulary to face situations in their real life in Paris. The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are reinforced and special emphasis is placed on pronunciation.In-class work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the City of Paris.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 2100 | Open
Pre-requisite: FR1200 French and Culture II OR FR2025 Intensive Intermediate French
This course reviews basic and complex sentence patterns in greater depth through discussions on students experience in Paris. Cultural and historical aspects of the French life are introduced. Students will learn additional vocabulary to express opinions, beliefs, doubts and emotions, and are shown various language registers (formal/informal vocabulary and structures) and intonations. Examples are taken from real life situations, film, television, newspaper articles, etc. The four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) will be reinforced.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 2200 | Open
Pre-requisite: FR 2100 or FR2025
This high intermediate course allows students to reinforce and expand their ability to express themselves, defend an opinion, and debate with others. Special attention is paid to increasing students ability to form complex sentences and express attitudes, wishes, necessity, doubt, emotions, to link ideas and to speculate.

*Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 3087 | Open
Pre-requisite: Taught in French. FR1100 Elementary French and Culture I OR FR1200 Elementary French and Culture II OR FR2100 Intermediate French and Culture I OR FR2200 Intermediate French and Culture II
Studies the numerous facets, whether real of imaginary, of the close relationship between Paris and cinema. Analyzes films made by famous directors such as Clair, Carne, Godard, Malle, Rohmer, Polanski, Collard, Kassovitz, and others.

Cross listed with FM 3087
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 3090 SB | Open
Pre-requisite: Taught in French - FR 2200
A limited number of students with requisite oral and written competence in French may follow one course at the Universite de Paris IV - Sorbonne. Every semester, a different selection of courses will be proposed from the Sorbonne's History department, generally on a subject of the cultural and social history of Europe. Students who are selected for participation attend amphitheater lectures and classroom meetings (travaux diriges) at the Sorbonne, and also classroom meetings at AUP through the semester with a designated faculty member. Tests, exams, oral presentations and papers are assigned both at the Sorbonne and at AUP. The course grade and credits are given as for an AUP course. Information on this cooperative program is available from Professor Miranda Spieler.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: CL 3070 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK 2005 Intermediate Ancient Greek I
This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Ancient Greek I. Students read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features the eyes of its fiction. Related films will be shown.

This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: CL 4070 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK3070
Advanced study in ancient Greek according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Greek author, genre, or period; Greek prose composition; Greek dialects; study of Greek meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Greek tragedy in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: GK 1005 | Open
This is a course for beginners. By reading simple ancient Greek texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Greek yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Greek for students of philosophy, is possible.


This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: GK 1006 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK1005 Elementary Ancient Greek I or placement.
This course continues Elementary Ancient Greek i. At the end of the course you will have an overview of the grammar and a basic vocabulary of c. 2000 words. You will learn how to write simple Greek texts yourself and start to read excerpts of original literature. specialization on certain classes of texts, e.g. Greek tragedies, is possible.


This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: GK 2005 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK1006 Elementary Ancient Greek II or placement
Revision and expansion of the skills acquired at the Elementary level and review of grammar knowledge. The main goal at this level is to gain fluency in reading. Texts will be selected according to the interests or needs of the student.


This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: GK 3070 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK2005 Intermediate Ancient Greek I or placement
This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Ancient Greek i. Students read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features.


This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Greek Language | Course #: GK 4070 | Open
Pre-requisite: GK3070 Intermediate Ancient Greek II or placement.
Advanced study in ancient Greek according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several ties with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Greek author, genre, or period; Greek prose composition; Greek dialects; study of Greek meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Greek tragedy in the original language (if a sufficient number interested students can be found).


This course is taught individually. Students communicate directly with professors about meeting times.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IL 1010 | Open
Introduces the Italian language with emphasis upon speaking, basic grammatical structure, with a particular focus on culture. Videos, CDs, plus a field trip to Venice (additional fee), make this class an enjoyable challenge.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: CL 3050 | Open
Pre-requisite: LT2001
This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Latin i. You read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features.

This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: CL 4050 | Open
Pre-requisite: CL3050 OR LT3050
Advanced study in Latin according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Latin author, genre, or period; Latin prose composition; study of Latin meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Latin drama in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: CL 4050 | Open
Pre-requisite: CL3050 OR LT3050
Advanced study in Latin according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Latin author, genre, or period; Latin prose composition; study of Latin meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Latin drama in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

This course is taught independently. Students communicate directly with the professor to determine meeting time.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LT 1001 | Open
This is a Latin course for beginners. By reading simple Latin texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Latin yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Medieval Latin, if possible.


This course is taught individually. Students schedule the time directly with the professor.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LT 2001 | Open
Pre-requisite: LT1002 Elementary Latin II or placement.
Revision and expansion of the skills acquired at the Elementary level and review of grammar knowledge. The main goal at this level is to gain fluency in reading. Texts will be selected according to the interests or needs of the student.


This course is taught individually. Students schedule their courses directly with the professor.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LT 3050 | Open
Pre-requisite: LT2001 Intermediate Latin I or placement.
This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Latin i. You read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features.


This course is taught individually. Students schedule the time directly with the professor.

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LT 4050 | Open
Pre-requisite: LT/CL3050 Intermediate Latin II or placement.
Advanced study in Latin according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Latin author, genre, or period; Latin prose composition; study of Latin meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Latin drama in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).


This course is taught individually, students schedule their time with the professor.

Cross listed with CL 4050

Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Linguistics | Course #: LI 1000 EB | Open
Many of us believe that the majority of people grow up as monolinguals, but in fact hundreds of millions of people all over the world are raised as bilinguals. The widespread impression that multilingualism is uncommon is often promoted by government policies. This class, while introducing students to the fundamental concepts of linguistics, will examine the foundations behind language acquisition, the influence of “Global English” on our world today, and the interaction between the politics of language and educational policy in particular. Using case studies, we will examine areas such as bilingual education, resistance to and maintenance of minority languages, and language dominance.
Contact Hours: 60

Global Leadership Certificate
Students can supplement a regular semester of studies with the SAI Global Leadership Certificate (GLC), designed to enrich students’ experiences and to acknowledge their academic and service work by providing an additional credential beyond a university transcript. Students enrolled in the Global Leadership Certificate program broaden their awareness of global issues and deepen their knowledge of the host community’s role in an increasingly interconnected world through exploration of research, engagement in community service and interaction with experts and leaders. Students interested in applying for the GLC should select the program at application. Your Admissions Counselor will help guide you through the process of selecting GLC-approved courses at the time of registration.

Courses & Schedule
AUP courses run Monday – Friday. SAI students are free to enroll in any combination of elective courses, but prerequisites must be demonstrated through students’ transcripts. Please note that listed course options are not final until days and times are posted; until then, courses options should be treated as tentative.

Course Registration
SAI students complete their course registration directly with AUP through their AUP student account. Upon confirming intention to pursue the SAI program at AUP, students receive login information for their AUP student account. AUP courses are competitive, and students should complete their course requests as early as possible. AUP course registration begins on the following date (students who submit their course request after this date risk not getting their first choice courses).

Fall Semester: coming soon

After students receive their course registration confirmation, no changes can be made until students arrive on-site. AUP’s drop/add period occurs during the first week of semester classes.


Pre-Departure Calendar
April 1 2017
Application Deadline
Applications accepted until May 1 as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
Coming soon
AUP Course Registration Opens
May 1 2017
50% of Total Program Fee Due*
*Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
June 15 2017
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
July 1 2017
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
July 1 2017
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
July 24 2017
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
August 24 2017
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Charles de Gaulle (CDG) airport. SAI airport pickup is provided between 8:00am and 12:00 noon, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
August 25 2017
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation is held at the SAI Paris office and introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
August 28 2017
AUP Academic Orientation
AUP holds week-long orientation activities. In addition to the mandatory orientation, students have opportunities to take city tours, join clubs, and meet professors.
September 4 2017
AUP Classes Begin
Coming soon
AUP Drop/Add Deadline
October 30 – November 3 2017
Fall Break (no class)
SAI office remains open.
December 8 2017
Classes End
December 9 – 12 2017
AUP Reading Period
Students are invited to study at the SAI office with snacks and treats.
December 13 – 19 2017
Final Exams
December 20 2017
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$21,980
Optional / Additional Fees:
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$3,075
Optional Premium Services Supplement
Provides the following additional services in SAI housing: weekly cleaning, weekly laundry, bi-weekly linen change.
$1,000
Optional Visa Processing Fee
Available for some jurisdictions.
$150
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Please note: students from some affiliate universities have different payment arrangements that may require students to pay different deposits to SAI and some fees directly to the affiliate university instead of SAI. Please contact your study abroad office or the SAI business department for further details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Paris
$900 $1,500
Visa
Visa fees (paid to French Consulate)
$200 $200
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
Course fees are sometimes imposed to cover field trips.
$100 $450
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$400 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $350 / month $450 / month
Transportation within Paris
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$125 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI weekend excursion
  • Frequent SAI cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Walking Tour
Students are welcomed to their new city through a walking tour of the many Parisian sites, including the Eiffel Tower and the Champs de Mars.

River Seine Boat Tour
Students take a boat tour on the Seine river catching a glimpse of the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, and Paris’s other famous sights. Following the tour the group takes a stroll along the Champs Elysées and coffee break.

Visit Musée Carnavalet & Walk Through the Marais
Students visit the Musée Carnavelet, a museum devoted to the history of Paris, followed by a stroll through the Marais: the Jewish district of Paris.

Weekend Trip to Bèziers
A former Roman colony dating back to 36 B.C., Bèziers, located in the southern Languedoc region, is known for its wine and bullfighting. Students spend the weekend exploring this ancient town, and catch a glimpse of the nearby Mediterranean Sea.

Night at the Theater
Students have the opportunity to see the Ballet Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker, at the historical Palais Garnier.

Day Trip to Reims in the Champagne Region
Students travel as a group by private shuttle to the city of Reims where they visit the numerous Maisons de Champagne in the region along the Route Touristique de Champagne. Students have the chance to taste and purchase Champagne directly from the producer. The trip includes lunch in a local French restaurant.

End of Semester Farewell Dinner
Students celebrate the end of a successful semester abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious French meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient, clean, and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (upgrade to private bedroom available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless internet. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Students living in apartments may opt to add Premium Services for a cost, which includes weekly cleaning and laundry services, and bi-weekly linen change.

Alternate Housing: Independent
Students seeking independent housing can do so, for a reduction in the SAI program fee. Please contact SAI for details. Students with independent housing are required to fill out SAI’s Independent Accommodation Information form.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 6 months after planned departure from France.

Student Visas
In accordance with French law students studying in France for 90 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Those with French/EU citizenship are exempted. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

Students must appear in person at the French Consulate to present their student visa application. Our Student Visa Office is available to assist students in getting ready for the appointment; SAI provides student visa consulting for all our students at no cost.

Please note that SAI is able to process visa applications (no trip to the Consulate required!) for students who live or attend school in some jurisdictions.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.