Paris College of Art
Fall Semester Elective 2020
12 - 19 credits

Spend a semester immersed in the lively creative scene of Paris! The SAI semester program at PCA is geared toward students interested in art and design, and is open to students both with and without previous experience. Visiting students select from a variety of art and design concentrations, usually aligned with their major, and select any elective courses from the array of art, design, management, and humanities offerings for a total of 12 - 19 US credits.


Application: closed

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Portfolio (see Academics)
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)
EU privacy consent form

NOTE: Due to the uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak, SAI has cancelled this on-site program. Please reach out to SAI Admissions to discuss your options.

Program Dates
August 28, 2020 – December 19, 2020


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: Sophomore (2nd year) or above.

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements



Art History
Communication Design
Design Management
Fashion Design
Fine Arts
Foundation
Interior Design
Liberal Studies
Photography

Art History

3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0103 | Open
This course introduces students to themes and topics relevant to the production and reception of the art and design disciplines taught at PCA. Using art and design objects located in Parisian collections as the basis for visual, contextual and cultural analysis, students will develop ways of seeing, contextualizing and describing art and design, while tackling a common set of issues, including but not limited to: chronology, style, authorship, form, function, composition, originality, narrative, and the decorative. Students will be guided as to how to conduct research in local collections and libraries and will produce a short contextually-oriented research paper on an art or design object or an artist or designer based on first-hand access to the object, artist, designer and archives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0227 | Open
History fashion in the 20th & 21st centuries investigates the evolution of dress in the past 120 years. The element of dress is taught in terms of cut and construction, development of fabric and materials, and accessories. Students will explore the development of dress within a wider cultural framework, and they will consider the role of historic events and social movements and their impact on the changing expression of fashion. Students will be encouraged to draw connections between earlier styles and their influence on later periods or the way they are interpreted in recent fashion collections. Materials: Notepad and computer for taking notes, sketchbook, library card for American Library in Paris and Musee des Arts Decoratifs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0230 | Open
This course will explore, analyze and compare Japanese, Scandinavian, North American, South American and Mediterranean architectures. Students will work toward the more focused goal of situating design and architecture practices within larger intellectual frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connections linking ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various and critical methodologies applicable to architecture and design, which will be used to critique and analyze visual materials. Students will learn to understand the inner argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically and to write more effectively.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0302 | Open
“The history of photography has been less a journey than a growth. Its movement has not been linear and consecutive, but centrifugal. Photography, and our understanding of it, has spread from a center; it has, by infusion, penetrated our consciousness. Like an organism, photography was born whole. It is in our progressive discovery of it that its history lies.” John Szarkoswki, who directed the New York MOMA photography department from 1962 until 1991, concluded in 1966 his introduction to “The Photographers’ Eye” with this paragraph. Confirmed by time in its forward looking accuracy, it also hints at the ambition involved in any survey of photography since 1960. This course will nonetheless take on the challenge, using an approach combining chronology and themes. Extensive focus will be placed on looking at photographs. The course will proceed chronologically and each class will explore a specific theme in depth. Themes are chosen for their general interest. To complete the perspective, works extending beyond the period alongside which they are introduced will be discussed as well.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0340 | Open
This interdisciplinary course explores the rise of visual media, communication and information, within the context of a broad cultural shift away from the verbal and textual toward the visual, which has taken place since the advent of photography and cinema in the late 19th century, through the birth of television, to the present proliferation of digital media worldwide. We will consider the critical practices of looking, historicizing and interpreting that have accompanied this 'visual turn'. Our readings will primarily address the theoretical foundations of the study of visual culture, which is understood to incorporate a variety of visual media and visual technologies: painting and sculpture, scientific imagery, material culture, the internet. If everything can be visual culture, what remains of traditional notions of medium specificity? What critical tools must be invented to analyze visual events from a visual cultural perspective? The relationship between the visual arts and visual media, especially with respect to the 'global' contemporary visual landscape, will be a focus of this course.
Contact Hours: 45

Communication Design

2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0211 | Open
For decades, typography has been everywhere. As the art of visual language, typography is inherently communicative. Spoken language is ephemeral and intangible. When written, language is captured in a visual and spatial form, permanent and concrete. Students discover the domain of typography, gain familiarity with typographical language and terms, and learn to work with typefaces for printed matters and digital use. The course will recall the history of typography, from the tradition to contemporary uses and students are introduced to digital typesetting and page layout software.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0220 | Open
The course provides the fundamental skills of graphic design. Students will become familiar with the visual vocabulary that builds the graphic design practice, through practical projects. Exploring the basic elements (form, color, type, image and their interconnections) and experimenting on different media and at different scales, the students will become familiar to the graphic design process and the visual problem solving.
Contact Hours: 30
4.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0300 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Core studios
This junior level studio course builds on sophomore year's curriculum by contextualizing general design theory and practice of their areas of interest. Social responsibility, sustainability, intellectual property, ethics and business practices are introduced into the design process. Research and ideation are integral components of this class, as it prepares students for their senior thesis project. Students apply this to projects for an industry sponsor, ngo/non-profit organization, or competition.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0302 | Open
This course will explore the large format printed media, studying, more specifically, typographical composition in Graphic Design. Traditional and experimental printing techniques are employed. A deeper reflection on how the combination of different scales and printing techniques impacts the Design choices will be the center of the class.
Contact Hours: 30
3.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0318 | Open
This course will focus on different multi-page documents design, with a particular emphasis on magazines and books (in printed and digital form). Students will acquire the skills to create continuity and variety across a range of pages, present different kind of information in context or appropriate formats, and develop an identity through the pages.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0323 | Open
This course develops the design methodology and technical skills to produce time-based linear narratives, animations, television graphics, opening credits, music videos, etc. The integration of sound and image is central to the development of motion graphics projects. After Effects and Final Cut are the principal programs taught in this class, along with the language and tools of motion graphics. Students learn to develop concepts and storyboards before commencing their final drafts.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0330 | Open
Pre-requisite: 2D Integrated Studio 1 + 2 or equivalent
This junior laboratory/technology studio course focuses on the design process and technical background required for designing effective interactive experiences, with an emphasis on design methodology for evolving systems. HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, and Web 2.0 CMS will be introduced along with specialized web design, imaging and animation tools. Students will design and mock up websites. The second semester delves further into notions of interface design, information architecture and web infrastructure.
Contact Hours: 45

Design Management

2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FCMD 0360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Design I & II or equivalent
Information Design concerns itself with the direct and accurate communication of data and is a core communication design skill. This course is involved with both the theory and application of information design principles and applies students' knowledge and vocabulary of visual organization to a sophisticated understanding of information design and data visualization, culminating in user research projects. Automated data visualizations using Processing programming language will be also part of the course.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0122 | Open
This course explores what is design management and gives an overview of topics and issues central to the subject, with an emphasis on understanding the basic skills required to become a design manager/strategic designer and the kinds of careers and futures design managers and entrepreneurs may enjoy. Why should we pay attention to design and why/how can we integrate design to coherent business strategies are other issues addressed in this course.
Contact Hours: 30
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0304 | Open
Retail involves a subtle mix of knowledge including but not limited to changing consumer behaviors and purchasing culture, e-commerce, costumer relation, retail environment, location, display, retail marketing, branding, expressing corporate strategies and objectives, logistics and supply chain. In this course, students gain an understanding of the principles of retailing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0307 | Open
This course will explore the responsibilities and accountability of businesses and managers with regards to ethical behavior. Why should companies behave ethically? How can managers create organizational cultures that support ethical behavior in all employees? The course will explore the nature of the ethical dilemmas managers can face and review the legal and regulatory climate in which companies must operate. This includes an overview of organizational structures, internal auditing, corporate governance, codes of ethics and internal stakeholder issues such as product quality, customer satisfaction, supply chain issues, employee wages and benefits, and local community and environmental responsibilities. How can managers embrace transparency in operations, be accountable to critics, internal and external, while balancing the needs of stakeholders from shareholders to NGOs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0313 | Open
Pre-requisite: Marketing, Economics 1 & 2, Strategic Design Management or equivalent(s).
This course is designed to study the impact of global economic models upon domestic economies. Issues explored include the impact of business on migrating populations, environmental movements, social climates, new technologies, and international trade agreements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0370 | Open
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principles and practices of financial statement analysis. The course therefore assumes only minimal knowledge by most students of financial accounting and finance. Primary emphasis is placed on mathematical problems and concepts relevant to financial and operational business applications, including regression, forecasting, sampling and statistical analysis. This course also lays the groundwork for more advanced study in finance and international business transactions in the fourth year.
Contact Hours: 45

Fashion Design

2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0205 | Open
Pre-requisite: foundation core studios - semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course teaches fashion hand drawing techniques mainly from live fashion models; first it will focus on body proportions, body details and body movement to later concentrate on the stylized fashion figure, allowing students to synthesize and create their own ideas.
Students will analyze the behavior of the fabric on the body, how different types of clothing hangs and reacts to movement.


Volume and perspective will be a subject of study through lights-shadow and forth-shortening techniques, which help students to situate their fashion figures in the space and prepare them to design clothes as soft sculptures, a bridge from 2D to 3D.

Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0207 | Open
Pre-requisite: foundation core studios - semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Practical application of appropriate computer software is a must to meet the demands of a hectic fashion market. This course explores CAD software techniques used in the fashion industry to enrich the possibilities of communication skills. Students will learn how to use vector drawings to create technical flats of garments, and basic rendering textile techniques to enhance digital image presentation.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0210 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Students are trained to fully explore and exploit various multi- and interdisciplinary sources in order to creatively apply investigative research to a conceptual design process. Students use sketchbooks as documentary tools and through market research gain awareness of fashion and design products and market categories as well as with current issues in international fashion. The second semester includes different methods and conceptual techniques for implementing effective design directions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0240 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0297 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Junior Design Studio integrates draping and pattern making as a means of achieving the student’s own designs and realizing them as finished garments. Focus is on the process of executing a design concept from its 2D form, including layout, cutting, construction, fitting, and finishes. Through technical projects, students continue to develop their skills. In the second semester students follow professional sample procedures to develop a garment from an original design under the direction of the instructor and a external designer critic. At the end of the semester they produce a 3 look collection that serves as preparation and practice for collection line-up and time management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0330 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This class focuses on digital tools for fashion design and fashion illustration. Students use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to prepare concept boards and collection concepts completed with scanned sources and original artwork. Exploring a variety of digital design and presentation methods, students will focus on developing new design concepts for defined niche markets; project briefs will involve research and style analysis of a French couture house or a European luxury brand. Applying digital communication and presentation skills, students will develop a new contemporary vision for an innovative product range and their own graphic identity presented in a professional PowerPoint presentation.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0332 | Open
Pre-requisite: Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course teaches students how to generate and develop various highly individual design concepts related to specific, identified market levels and product segments. Different principles of collection work and collection concepts are applied to set project briefs. Methods of presentation in relation to the fashion design portfolio enhance appropriate visuals for the fashion design process. Observational fashion, design, and trend research sketchbooks form part of this course, as well as external project briefs, which are reviewed and assessed by professionals from the French fashion and clothing industry (e.g. Designer Critic Project).
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0376 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore core studios
This course increases students knowledge of natural and synthetic fibers, fabrics, and materials as well as the range and application of textiles to the special requirements of clothing production. Students are given an overview of the textile and fiber markets, including fiber identification, knowledge of yarns, and fabric constructions. Dyeing, printing, and finishing methods are introduced to learn characteristics of finished cloth for end use. The historical background of different textiles is examined as well as contemporary developments and the changing values assigned to different textiles.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Fashion Core Studios
Working away from the stretched canvas to different structures and surfaces, exploring scale and more site-specific projects, introducing the notion of space within a 2D context, this course will address in class systematically formal painting issues, i.e.; texture, mark, scale, color, composition etc. These issues will accompany important themes in Contemporary Art without replacing them. This undergraduate painting course aims to enable each student to pursue their ideas in and around painting in all its forms in the most committed, imaginative and experimental way. Work may manifest itself in a wide variety of different mediums and materials. This course engages with and contributes to the change and development in the expanded field of art. Although its core concern is with practice, it promotes the hybrid nature of current art practices by exploring the boundaries of, and the interface between, art and critical ideas. Furthermore this class aims to develop the individualization of the students' pictorial language. Prerequisites : Foundation Core studios List of supplies : Black & white acrylic paint ( or Oil if you wish), Assortment of colors:Cadmium red light or equivalent, Cadmium Yellow light or equivalent, Ultramarine Blue, Ivory Black, Titanium white, Raw Umber extra colors of interest: Cobalt/cerulean Blue, Viridian, Pthalocyanine Green, earth colors, Umbers & Siennas, Manganese Violet, Cadmium Orange Charcoal ( bigger the better ) avoid tiny vine sticks, stick to medium thickness, either compressed or soft. variety of brushes, (flats, rounds, house paint, rollers as you wish) Scotch masking tape and pushpins. Staple gun. Canvas pliers if you wish to work on canvas. One liter of white Gesso Sketchbook (size and style are up to your choice.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0205 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core Studios
The course will revolve around presentations and assignments to create a platform for analyzing your own emerging practice and learning how to pinpoint and develop themes from within it. The second half of the course will encourage the development of your personal areas of interest through dialogue, peer review and personal tutorial. Sculpture will be approached as a process of materializing and actualizing connection to Spaces and Objects (including politics, humans, histories...) and will reassess classical connotations of sculptural form by opening them to a wider range of issues coming from video, architecture, document and research approaches to art-making.


Following the first semesters discussions on independent practice, the spring semester will focus on strengthening students personal artistic language and ability to locate and isolate relevant research topics either through intuitive, logical or thematic thinking.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0207 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core Studios
This course is designed to build on existing technical knowledge and skills, facilitating a more focused approach to the relationship between creative technology and practice. The course seeks to explore drawing within contemporary fine art practice. The workshops will focus on the process of drawing as concept, drawing as subject matter, drawing to create or define context, drawing as source and resource to develop a personal expressive language.
The aims of the course are to extend advanced and technical knowledge, to encourage a broad range of unfamiliar materials, process and to facilitate experimentation. Research methods will be introduced to support your projects and to encourage a critical approach/response to ideas.
Instruction is delivered through studio sessions, site work, teaching events and demonstrations, and coordinates thematically with other coursework in the sophomore year curriculum.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0209 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core studios
The video course is organized as a creative workshop, where students are encouraged to engage quickly in a personal research. A strong involvement is necessary to achieve any 4D project including in class tutorials and independent work. The first semester will be devoted to technical familiarization with the different filming tools, recording sound and linear editing, in order to acquire spontaneity. The goal for this first term is to develop all the technical skills, and create automatisms to best serve the video practice. Students will be encouraged to use their personal filming tools (smartphones, regular consumer cameras ...), as basic as they could seem, to allow a common and natural usage. The collected imagery and sound will serve student all year to build their personal research and artistic proposals. We will see how different artists create images from three constitutive elements: light, space, and time. We will learn that an image can not be simply reduced to the broadcast visual element, but includes the contextual presentation. We will discuss the importance of the distribution of light and colors in the development of this overall picture, which will introduce the space, set design and the role of the spectator. We will approach the various possible temporal modalities of the image broadcast: real time, delayed linear continuity, disruptive continuity (interactivity, random images ...), and their influence on the space and the role of the spectator. Prerequisites : Foundation Core studios List of supplies : - Dedicated sketchbook for research A4 minimum - Black pen, colored markers, paper glue, papers of different colors/aspects/fibers, cutter - Laptop computer - Adobe Suite installed (Adobe Premiere, Adobe Media Encoder, and Adobe Photoshop for the minimum). Please, try to get same software version than on the College computers. - USB key (>8Go) - Video capture device (smartphone, camera, video camera) - Tripod - Sound recorder.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0305 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year sculpture
This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0309 | Open
The Studio Concepts course challenges and encourages the students to explore the different creative processes and contemporary artistic practices. Open to research all media ranging from painting, drawing to photography and video, from objects, sculpture to installations and any un-familiar propositions, the students may experience and develop their ideas that emerge spontaneously out of experimentation and process.

Through research and reference the students need to justify and document their ideas and proposals. The projects will include concepts and process; develop context and ideas.
The aim of the studio concept course is to encourage and enable students to create an individual and critical approach/response to ideas and tasks, spanning all disciplines and to assure an underlying connection to the student's construction and deconstruction of their chosen areas and personal practice.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0313 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Core Video 1 & 2
This required Junior studio provides a highly-intensive introduction to video production. The fall course is an investigation of the moving image as an art form. Students will revise the basics of the language of film by further developing methodology and technical skills necessary to produce their own videos and animations. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to artists working in the field and will consider filmmaking and animation in relation to Fine Arts. Students will participate in all aspects of digital, time-based media production including concept development, storyboarding, shooting, editing, screening of final works and DVD authoring.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0315 | Open
Today, textiles are being used in a greater measure on the art scene: the embroidered canvases of Ghada Amer, the installations of Annette Messager, the knitted rock from Andy Holden or the patchworks of Tracey Emin, are a few examples of this innovative use of textiles. This course proposes to explore textiles as a medium to translate fine arts or design projects. Whether your field of interest is surface pattern, imagery, construction in space, mass, volume, sculpture, you will be taken through experimentation and technical instructions, such as hand and machine knitting, weaving, dyeing and various treatments, to develop a strong personal project. Individual assessment throughout your research will lead you to propose daring textile solutions as an alternative means of expression or design.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0317 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year painting
In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training.
The strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0320 | Open
Perceive space-time/Essays capturing time Approached as a process that unfolds over the course of 15 sessions 'Time records' is a series of actions / recordings that recount viewing time over a period of 4 month through an artistic proposal. The project questions the metric representation of time by creating an object or an installation that expresses a relationship between biological time, the measured time and lived time. This representation must lead to phenomenal perception of time and be a subject of experience that addresses our senses versus a metric representation. Time measurement accuracy and its omnipresence in our society mark a gap between the real-time, subjective and the social time being metric. The work will be the result of a set of data collected (recordings, recordings of data) or created (micro performances, repetitive movements). The project can be expressed by programming graphic behaviors (or physical ones) but also through a more analog device. One can imagine that the projects include forms of motorizations, the LED lights, video projections ... any media controllable by computer. But also in a graphical code, visual, colored, kinetic, expressing a time track. The installation completed will take a mixed form (digital and physical) and perhaps destined for a specific use (public- private) or an experimental approach.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0326 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year drawing, advanced drawing skills
This course will focus on the actual drawing process as concept and experimental research as resource. Drawing as the subject matter, drawing context and the actual drawing practice to develop new ways of expression and mixing media, new ways to appropriate the act of drawing. This course is not about drawing things, but to encourage students to explore the actual physicality of making a drawing or to question the physical involvement of drawing; to explore existing and reinventing new methods, ideas or processes simultaneously. Through different exercises, in class workshops or given assignments the students can invent and develop a personal language and propose new ideas, make links between media and technologies.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0348 | Open
This course takes an experimental approach to printmaking, promoting open dialogue with old and new materials and processes. Studio work covers not only the traditional methods of intaglio and relief printing, screen printing and color surface monoprinting, but also all forms of hand-based transfer that involve inking up a surface (body parts, objects, whole cars) and pulling a print. Students are also encouraged to explore the potential for hybrid and combination printing (silkscreen on steel, woodcut on latex, digital print onto Perspex...) as well as integrating print into 3D/4D practice to help solve creative dilemmas and stimulate fresh new ideas. Contemporary printmaking 1, begins with the introduction to simple printmaking techniques, such as mono types, dry point, stencils and linoleum. Students are introduced to the concepts of a print, with the transfers of information from one surface to another, to the idea of the multiple and story telling.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0349 | Open
Pre-requisite: Printmaking I
This course engages more complex forms of printmaking, such as photo emulsion silkscreen, laser lithography and other forms of etching to encourage students to combine printing techniques. The course will be given in a workshop environment, using water based materials.
Contact Hours: 45

Foundation

3.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0110 | Open
This course is an introduction to dimensions in art and design (2D, 3D, Photography and Moving Image) through material processes. Over the course of the semester students rotate for one month through three discipline areas. A common theme links the three courses and projects overlap and develop progressively. All first years take part in a joint critique of their work. Students are taught how to use practical tools and shown methods for handling materials that provide concrete starting points for creative practice. These include, but are not limited to: book-making, basic printmaking, black and white printing, sewing inductions, moving image workshops, and the operation of woodwork machinery.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0170 | Open
This course aims to equip all first year students with the necessary skills and confidence to be able to use digital tools. The curriculum is project-led and structured so that students can apply their growing skill-set to realize their ideas. All projects are contextualized with examples of work by contemporary artists and designers who are working with digital media. Students are introduced to the possibilities for digital tools as part of their creative work.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0174 | Open
Students explore their immediate neighborhood and the city at large as a site of inspiration. The city and its spaces become an extended classroom. Students respond to a theme designed to encourage interaction and integration with their surroundings and new, unexpected ways of looking at their environment. Site visits, walks, lectures, readings, and practical exercises guide students through different approaches to the creative process with the aim that they develop their own methodologies and engage with the city as potential artists and/or designers.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0176 | Open
Drawing--across all first year studio courses and in every progression track at PCA--is considered a fundamental discipline for creative practice. The aim is to give students both a vital course in traditional skills and an introduction to contemporary and emerging approaches to drawing. Included in this class are subject specific workshops such as: digital illustration, gesture/dance, experimental fashion drawing, drawing and film. The purpose of this course is to instill a lively and inspired discipline that students will continue to practice in many forms beyond their foundation year.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior Design

3.0 Credits
Interior Design | Course #: FINT 0303 | Open
The course aims at helping students to become aware that light is, first of all, a material, a tool to shape spaces, and thus handled and processed as such. Space lighting will be approached from the creative point of view – without it being limited to technological aspects. Students will understand the physiological and psychological aspects of lighting in interior design and will learn to define lighting project intentions in different types of spaces such as an apparel store, an art exhibition space or a restaurant.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Interior Design | Course #: FINT 0304 | Open
In this class, students perfect resources for the visualization and the communication of interior design projects, both orally and visually. Students develop and explore new concepts, alternative methods and ideas to visually illustrate and present the various phases of the design process: from concept boards, fast scale models and graphics to rendering techniques and digital fabrication tools.
Contact Hours: 45

Liberal Studies

1.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 0010 | Open
Paris Inside/Out is a one-credit course consisting of visits to art and design exhibits, as well as meetings with artists, artisans and designers in Paris. The course will use a wide approach by including a variety of artistic fields, thus allowing students to draw inspiration from any discipline. The course will be held every week in a different location in Paris.

Students are free to participate in as many visits as they wish, however a minimum of 5 visits are required to pass the course. A 1-page essay will be written for each visit, and must be submitted within two days of the visit, along with either a photo or an illustration. The professor will regularly select an essay that will be published in LOOP. At the end of the semester, students will be asked to present in class a personal work inspired by one of the visits during the semester.

This is a pass/fail course.

Contact Hours: 15
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1011 | Open
This year-long course is designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn to understand the inherent argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically, and to write more effectively by developing skills in the structure, grammar, and mechanics of writing. Students also work toward the more focused goal of situating design and art practices within larger intellectual, historical and philosophical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connection between ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various methodologies applicable to art and design, which can then be used to critique and analyze visual and material artifacts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1150 | Open
French for Paris is a course open to beginners who would like to expand their knowledge of French culture and develop their listening & speaking skills. The course will cover specific themes relating to everyday life in Paris, its history, its culture and the arts. Emphasis will be placed on phonetics (rhythm, intonation, liaisons, silent letters & some specific French sounds) as well as everyday vocabulary and exchanges. Different subjects will be developed over the semester: cultural life in Paris, French cinema, French and Francophone cuisine, as well as music. Students will be able to engage in short conversations, and will practice describing themselves and their environment along with their studies and artistic practice. Visits in French will be organized. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (readings, targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics, etc.) Class will be conducted in French.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 2004 | Open
A non-technical survey course emphasizing symmetry as a unifying theme. The scientific method, the diversity, and unity of all living things will be presented in this context. The areas of investigation include the human body, zoology, botany, and microorganisms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 2250 | Open
Pre-requisite: Intermediate level French required.
French Language and Culture is a course open to anyone who has some knowledge of French and would like to improve their listening & speaking skills. The course will cover specific themes such as Paris and its architecture, French cinema, French artists and artistic movements, as well as professional life in Paris. Students will develop key vocabulary in order to be able to communicate orally in French in everyday life situations, as well as in professional settings. Using a variety of materials, students will learn how to tell a story, make a description of their work and practice, talk about a personal experience or project, and give their opinion. Four museum guided tours in French will be organized during the semester. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (readings, targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics, etc.) Class will be conducted in French.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 3016 | Open
In this course, we examine the development of world politics throughout the twentieth century and the modern geopolitical imagination that animates it. The ultimate aim is to develop conceptual and theoretical tools to explain contemporary developments in world politics. Special focus is placed on the political impact on humanitarian policies and their implementation in different cases. Through careful reading, informed discussion and thoughtful writing, we will draw connections between contemporary migration and global histories of trade, capitalism, slavery, colonialism, (under) development, urbanization, globalization and conflict. In order to understand migration's dramatic impact on ideas about identity, language, culture and belonging, we will focus on a varied selection of critical essays, current news items, photographs, music, visual art, short stories, poems, documentaries and feature films as well as blogs and other forms of new media.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 3343 | Open
Semiotics is the science of signs. This course will offer an introduction to the discipline of semiotics. We will read its foundational texts – from Saussure to Peirce and Barthes - and apply them to the worlds of photography, design, and fashion, as well as the media, analyzing how artifacts can be interpreted as visual manifestations of social structures. Students will have a chance to bring their own work to bear on their study and vice versa.
Contact Hours: 45

Photography

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0218 | Open
The medium of photography is largely defined by its history of black and white pictures. The course will cover camera operation, principles of exposure and photographic composition concepts. The goal of this class is to provide a solid foundation of photographic black and white photography skills and techniques. It provides an overview of classic black and white photography while discussing camera techniques that apply to both traditional film and digital cameras. Students will learn how to effectively use their cameras in manual mode and make good quality negatives. The class includes camera and exposure meter instruction, technical lectures, effective scanning methods and instruction on film/digital crossover techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0230 | Open
This seminar addresses both technique and critique. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and field, recreating the conditions of the working photographer. Technique is at the service of ideas. The development of a personal project will also be required. Students will continue to develop a strong body of work informed by critical readings and discussions. An essential aspect of the seminar is the deepening of visual sensibilities and the discovery of new ways of seeing. Students will work on multiple projects throughout the semester and produce and present a cohesive body of work at the end of the term.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0232 | Open
Pre-requisite: Black & White Photography or Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.
This is the first part of a yearlong course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio environment. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast and reflection. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments of tabletop still lifes and portraiture. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Assignments will be theme based: headshots, full portraits, and several still lifes.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0240 | Open
Social documentary photography is a narrative genre of photography emphasizing information over impression. This course, which uses both traditional 35mm and digital photo materials, introduces students to the history and practice of social documentary photography, its tools and techniques. The first part of the course will provide a brief historical overview and then focus on issues of content, editorial processes, sequencing, production and presentation. The second part of the course will engage students in critical discussions surrounding photography and objectivity but also address political, social and ethical implications such as voyeurism, victimization, exploitation, etc. Students are expected to create photographic narratives, that reflect a critical awareness and an understanding of contemporary approaches and strategies.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0257 | Open
Pre-requisite: Black & White Photography, Introduction to Digital Photography, Digital Skills & Composition or equivalent.
This year-long course introduces students to the creative and technical possibilities of digital photography. Through demonstrations and hands-on sessions, students learn the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to produce effective digital photographs. Students are taken through all the basic processes encountered in digital workflow, from basic scanning and retouching, image enhancement, and printing fundamentals, to RAW file processing and photographic post-production methods.
Contact Hours: 30
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0300 | Open
This is a yearlong course building on the Freshman and Sophomore Seminars, serving as a critical and technical exploration of the language and theory of photography. Students will further develop their individual photographic statements while placing their work within conceptual and historical contexts. This semester, we will be placing a particular emphasis on working with medium and large format cameras. Artists working in other mediums, such as video, sculpture, painting and installation, will be examined as well. Students will work on two shorter assignments and one longer term, self-designed project throughout the first semester, culminating in a body of work that will be presented at the end-of-the-term show.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0303 | Open
Focusing on the application of photography and installation, this course will explore the uses of photography in space. The course will concentrate on the implications of the relationships among artist, object and image. Through the experimental and nontraditional approaches in installation, the student will explore the formal, spatial, conceptual and visual presentation of installation. The presentation of still and time-based media in screen-based and installation environments will also be covered.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0326 | Open
This course will look at both the business and practical side of the photographic industry and the importance of understanding and working to a client brief. Students will shoot an advertising campaign for a chosen brand in the studio and on location. All work will be produced in the context of the final printed formats with typography. A call sheet & invoice will be produced for each shoot. We will look at legal agreements, contracts, model releases, copyright and reproduction rights, rights of the client, photographer and third parties. On the fine art side: We will look at dealing with galleries, physical and online, submissions, commissions, promotion, paperwork, framing and private views. Remember "You are your own brand," as David Ogilvy said, "if you cannot sell yourself, what hope have you of selling anything else?"
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0333 | Open
This creative advanced lighting course will built on Lighting Seminar I and II and introduce students to a broad range of advanced lighting situations. Students will also learn how to analyze light in contemporary photography (Phillip Llorca di Corcia, Roger Ballen, Gregory Crewdson, Jeff Wall) and in various other mediums such as cinema (David Lynch, Jean-Luc Godard, Henri-Georges Clouzot, Igmar Bergman, Wim Wenders, etc), cinetic art, amongst others. The students will then use these influences for their various assignments. They will learn how to be creative in using the techniques they have acquired in Lighting Techniques I and II. Through hands-on practice and creative assignments, students will become comfortable with the use of all commonly used professional lighting equipment and accessories. The students will be able to choose from a series of assignments or to create their own.
Contact Hours: 30
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0500 | Open
The main aim of this class is to provide students with the tools and techniques required to document their work in a professional manner in order to share it with prospective clients. Students in all the new M.A. programs (accessories design, fashion design, fashion photography, interior design) will need to be proficient in photographing objects and/or interiors. Photographing still life is different from portraiture or street photography, and requires mastery of lighting and mise en scene.
Contact Hours: 30

Applied Volunteer Opportunities
Visiting semester students at PCA have the opportunity to get involved in a wide range of short non-credit volunteer activities. This includes assisting at gallery events, fashion week, and working with individual artists in the city. Students return home with a unique and diverse resume of hands-on experience. Further details are provided to students upon arrival.

Course Concentrations & Portfolio Requirements
PCA offers the concentrations below. Students applying for Studio Concentrations should be able to demonstrate some prior experience in their chosen concentration.

Studio Concentrations – portfolio required at application: 10-20 images, submitted via dropbox/web link

  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Fine Arts
  • Interior Design
  • Photography

Other Concentrations – portfolio required at application (see detail)

  • Critical Studies – portfolio: writing sample. This may be an assignment completed for a current or previous class; something that the student feels is a representative example of her/his current style and ability.

Courses & Schedule
PCA courses run Monday – Friday. SAI students are free to enroll in any combination of elective courses, but prerequisites for specific classes must be demonstrated through students’ transcripts.

Course Registration
Students choose their elective courses after they have been accepted into the program. As soon as the PCA semester schedule is confirmed, students are asked to complete a Course Approval form, which is used to specify first-choice and alternate-choice courses. Students are free to enroll in any available courses, but most should be within their determined concentration. All posted schedules of classes are tentative and subject to change unless otherwise noted. After registration is complete, any schedule changes must be made during the add/drop period at PCA, which is typically the first week of classes.


Pre-Departure Calendar
May 15 2020
Application Closes
Applications accepted until April 15 as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
June 1 2020
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
June 1 2020
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
July 1 2020
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
July 1 2020
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
August 1 2020
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
August 28 2020
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Charles de Gaulle (CDG) airport. SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 12:00 noon, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
August 29 2020
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation is held at the SAI Paris office and introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
August 31 – Sept 3 2020
PCA Academic Orientation
PCA orientation introduces students to their school and professors, and includes activities to get to know classmates.
September 7 2020
PCA Classes Begin
September 7 – 15 2020
Add / Drop Period
December 18 2020
Final Exams End
December 19 2020
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $120
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$22,650
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$3,400
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement
Homestay housing in a private room. Includes daily breakfast and 3, 5 or 7 dinners/week.
3 dinners – $410
5 dinners – $955
7 dinners – $1,360
International Mailing Supplement
When applicable, students are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$90

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Paris
$900 $1,200
Visa
$350 $450
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
$100 / course $450 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$400 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $350 / month $450 / month
Transportation within Paris
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$125 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI 360° Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities & weekend excursion
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Access to and assistance with international cell phone plans
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers all students the Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities, at no extra cost, for participants to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Walking Tour
Students are welcomed to their new city through a walking tour of the many Parisian sites, including the Eiffel Tower and the Champs de Mars.

River Seine Boat Tour
Students take a boat tour on the Seine river catching a glimpse of the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, and Paris’s other famous sights. Following the tour the group takes a stroll along the Champs Elysées and coffee break.

Visit Musée Carnavalet & Walk Through the Marais
Students visit the Musée Carnavelet, a museum devoted to the history of Paris, followed by a stroll through the Marais: the Jewish district of Paris.

Weekend Excursion to Nice, the Mediterranean Côte d’Azur
SAI students enjoy an unforgettable weekend excursion to experience the beauty of the French Riviera and Nice. Located in the South of France, Nice is a beautiful coastal city on the Mediterranean Côte d’Azur, full of culture and many museums, markets, beaches, and other impressive monuments and historic sites. The weekend includes walking tours, exploring parks and museums, getting to know beautiful seaside towns, eating delicious food, and of course, beaches!

Night at the Theater
Students have the opportunity to see the Ballet Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker, at the historical Palais Garnier.

Day Trip to Reims in the Champagne Region
Students travel as a group by private shuttle to the city of Reims where they visit the numerous Maisons de Champagne in the region along the Route Touristique de Champagne. Students have the chance to taste and purchase Champagne directly from the producer. The trip includes lunch in a local French restaurant.

Farewell Dinner
Students celebrate the end of a successful semester abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious French meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing assignments are single gender; other housing configurations may be available under limited circumstances. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
Students choosing the homestay option will be placed with a local family, which could be an older couple or a family with children. SAI homestay families are thoroughly screened and are accustomed to welcoming visiting students into their homes. Homestays provide a private bedroom in the family home with basic furnishings. Wifi is included, as is access to laundry facilities. Students opting for this more immersive housing get breakfast included as well as the option of a certain number of dinners per week (cost varies).

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Europe.

Student Visas
In accordance with French law students studying in France for 91 or more days are required to obtain a student visa. Those with French/EU citizenship are exempted. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

Students must appear in person at a VFS Visa Processing Center to present their student visa application. Visa applicants living in the United States are able to set up their appointment at one of the nine visa centers regardless of their location. VFS Global Centers are located in Washington DC, Boston, New York, Atlanta, Houston, Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. In some cases the nearest processing center may be in a neighboring state, which might necessitate air travel. Please plan and budget accordingly. Our Student Visa Office is available to assist students in getting ready for their appointment; SAI provides student visa consulting for all our students at no cost.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.