Paris College of Art
Spring Semester Elective 2018
12 - 19 credits

The PCA semester program is geared toward students interested in art and design, and is open to students both with and without previous experience. Visiting students select from a variety of art and design concentrations, usually aligned with their major, and select any elective courses from the array of art, design, management, and humanities offerings for a total of 12 - 19 credits.


Application Deadline
October 1, 2017
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements

Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Portfolio (see Academics)
Passport scan (photo page)
Digital photo (passport style)

Highlights

  • Design your ideal schedule
  • Take part in art and design events around Paris
  • Study alongside some of the most creative young artists in Europe

Program Dates
January 5, 2018 – May 18, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Sophomore (2nd year) or above.

Cumulative GPA:* 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale)

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements



Art History
Communication Design
Design Management
Fashion Design
Fine Arts
Foundation
Illustration
Interior Design
Language
Liberal Studies
Photography

Art History

3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0222 | Open
The industrial revolution made new forms of technology and mass communication possible, allowing not only for the mechanical reproduction of the image and its circulation on a large scale, but also new materials, new processes, and new media. These developments have had a decisive impact on visual culture, on aesthetic categories, and on the status of the image. The aesthetic revolution began in Montmartre in the 1880s, reached a climax in SoHo in the 1960s, and continues to shape visual culture and aesthetic debates today. What status does the image have? What is the difference between a Brillo box produced by industrial means and one produced by Andy Warhol? Does a distinction between high art and kitsch still matter in the age of Pop? How have the transformations in visual and material culture affected the productive activity of artists, or conversely, how does artists’ activity take up and critically remark upon these transformations? How has the Pop aesthetic translated and transmuted in contemporary global culture? These are the kinds of questions that this course will explore.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0303 | Open
This course is an introduction to the history of photography from the 1960s up to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies in the context of postmodernity. It will explore a broad range of contemporary photographs from around the world. The primary task of the course will be to familiarize the student with the key figures in the photographic history and the artistic movements of the period. By doing this, we shall observe how the media increased and changed. Over the last three decades photography managed to become a fully recognized art form. It entered galleries, museums, libraries and private collections as a highly valuable object. The medium seems to have entered the realm of fine arts. We shall evaluate the relationship between photography and the visual arts in general. One of the key questions for analysis will concern the increasing permeability of boundaries between media. We will pay particular attention to the impact of digital technologies on the medium. We will engage in discussion and debate regarding the meaning, relevance and significance of both theoretical developments and actual practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FHCA 0305 | Open
This course will examine how artists from the mid-19th to the early 21st Centuries conceive of and talk about their own artistic practice. While artists works are frequently viewed through the lens of art history or criticism, students will consider how artists present, engage with and develop further levels of inquiry into their work. Topics covered will include artists published writings, their notebooks, the artists statement versus the manifesto, and their teachings. The course will also offer the opportunity to explore the relationships between artistic identity and art work, ranging from analysis of self-portraits to their performance on screen. Students will discover the extent to which artists practice depends upon a critical awareness of the cultural, theoretical, and historical matrix in which they operate. Assignments will include research projects on artists and the preparation of a statement that defines the students own self-conception of their studio practice or area of study.
Contact Hours: 45

Communication Design

2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0204 | Open
Pre-requisite: Typography I or equivalent course.
The second part of this yearlong course builds on the fundamental typographical forms and functions acquired during Typography 1. The course extends the vocabulary and approaches more complex problems related to typographic hierarchy, context, sequence and scale. A deeper exploration of typography behaves across media will be the opportunity for students to experiment on complex typographical systems, implementing applications in private or public space, environment, or digital time-based projects.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0221 | Open
Pre-requisite: Graphic Design I, or equivalent course.
This course is the second part of year long course for sophomore students studying Communication Design.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0224 | Open
The manner in which an idea or finished project is presented is crucial. Improve your ability to communicate visually in this hands-on design workshop in which a variety of both traditional and contemporary tools and techniques are used to produce tangible documents for presentation. This class will, however, give students the opportunity to take their work beyond the presentation stage, as some of the projects will be printed professionally. Students will be required to produce print specifications which include choice of paper, use of color (i.e. Pantone or CMYK), size of print run, finishing, etc.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0234 | Open
An in depth study of letterforms and their relationship to space. Students evaluate and prioritize information for communication based on size, weight and positioning of letterforms. They understand the importance of eye travel and movement. They examine the past, present and future development in typography. Using the pencil, brush, camera and computer, emphasis is placed on the development of communications.


We will criticize the work, compare notes, discuss, look at documentations, books, read, do research together. Becoming well-versed in typography will help you in many ways, regardless of your creative direction & areas of concentration. As visual communicators, you will not only work with images but with words too. By understanding typography history, language, applications & power, your strength as a designer will be heightened. Once you understand the principles, you will be free to play.

Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0235 | Open
The second part of this yearlong course builds on last semesters Type Studio: Concept course.

Emphasis is again placed on methodology, research and conceptual development as well as the successful communication of ideas. Through a series of applied assignments that focus on form, a stronger set of visual, conceptual, technical and verbal skills will be developed. Structured progressively, assignments will culminate in a complete and coherent identity and expose students to various creative approaches. Through this process students will gain a deeper understanding of the role form plays in the design process, focusing on the intellectual, practical, and emotional characteristics that construct meaning through form (usefulness, usability and desirability). Through lectures, hands-on exercises, assignments, critiques students will learn to use typography to solve communication and visual problems.

Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0236 | Open
Pre-requisite: Digital Imaging and Multimedia or equivalent
This studio course requires a basic knowledge of computer graphics and is centered on multimedia authoring software. The focus is authorship, in that more so than a formgiver, the designer acts as a content creator familiar with advanced concepts in interactive multimedia. Students are encouraged to conceptualize, design, prepare and program a multimedia project for eventual publication on the internet.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Core studios. Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2.
This junior level studio course builds on sophomore year's curriculum by contextualizing general design theory and practice to each student's areas of interest. Social responsibility, sustainability, intellectual property, ethics and business practices are introduced into the design process. Research and ideation are integral components of this class, as it prepares students for their senior thesis project. Students apply this to projects for an industry sponsor, NGO/non-profit organization, or competition.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0305 | Open
This studio course explores the use of type and image in spatial contexts: retail design, exhibition design, signage or way-finding systems. It considers the tools and skills of typography, color, images and composition in relation to the human experience of three-dimensional space.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0316 | Open
Pre-requisite: TYPE: CORE CONCEPT AND DESIGN OR EQUIVALENT
Type is everywhere. Regardless of prior experience, this course will equip each student with a deeper understanding of typography and will challenge individuals to recognize and break typographic habits. Through a series of exercises, lectures and projects, this class will focus on various ways to handle and recognize type. From the very small to the very large, students will get a handle on your sans serif and serif A’s as well as learning to mind your typographic P’s and Q’s.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0321 | Open
Through the exploration of traditional printing techniques (such as silkscreen, stencil, block printing etc.) and the combination of them with digital processes, students will design large format printed visuals, focusing on the interaction between typography and photography or illustration.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0331 | Open
Pre-requisite: 2D Integrated Studio 1 + 2 or equivalent. Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2.
This junior laboratory/technology studio course focuses on the design process and technical background required for designing effective interactive experiences, with an emphasis on design methodology for evolving systems. HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, and Web 2.0 CMS will be introduced along with specialized web design, imaging and animation tools. Students will design and mock up websites. The second semester delves further into notions of interface design, information architecture and web infrastructure.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0342 | Open
Pre-requisite: "Type: Core Concept and Design," or equivalent.
This course is aimed to equip students with a deeper understanding of typography, from its design to its composition. Typography is everywhere: publications (printed or digital), packaging, wayfinding systems, advertising etc. The class will focus on how handling, in detail, typographical compositions applied to these different media and in different sizes (from the very small to the very big). The line, the paragraph, the page and the multi-page product will be studied. A specific vocabulary related to deep typographical concept will be acquired: (not exhaustively) leading, kerning, tracking, hyphenation, white spaces, break characters etc. An historical overview of the evolution of the typography will be also covered, supported by lectures on case studies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communication Design | Course #: FCMD 0350 | Open
Pre-requisite: Type: Core Concept and Design or equivalent
The course studies how brands establish their territory, how they grow, prosper, adapt, evolve, stumble and bounce back. Topics we will explore include: naming, logo design, corporate identity, advertising, marketing, merchandising. During the course, students will approach and discuss how to support the online presence of a brand. At the end of the course students will be able to analyse existing brands, evaluate their performance, and propose repositioning strategies that take into account the latest trends.
Contact Hours: 45

Design Management

3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0105 | Open
This course is an introduction to human-centered design methods. Drawing on cultural and social sciences, the course gives an overview, both theoretical and practical, of the different techniques that can be deployed throughout the design process in order to ensure the fit between the design of products and services and the material and socio-cultural contexts in which these products and services are ultimately used and experienced. As such, the course aims at providing students with a theoretical framework to understand socio-cultural and material contexts as well as the practical and analytical tools to explore them.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Design I & II or equivalent
This course applies students knowledge and vocabulary of visual organization to a sophisticated understanding of information design, culminating in a user research project. This studio class will draw upon design and technological skills acquired in previous design studios. Topics covered include research methods and data gathering techniques; the importance of data ink and the concept of graphical redesign; simplification of graphical information; small multiples; and narratives of space and time.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0205 | Open
This introductory course focuses on the theories and principles of standard marketing strategies and practices, so that students may begin to develop a framework for understanding marketing tactics and strategies useful for design-driven and other creative businesses. The course’s goals are to introduce students to marketing strategy and to the elements of marketing analysis (customer analysis, competitor analysis, and company analysis), as well as to familiarize them with the elements of the marketing mix (product strategy, pricing, advertising and promotion, and distribution).
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0225 | Open
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principles and practices of financial statement analysis. The course therefore assumes only minimal knowledge by most students of financial accounting and finance. Primary emphasis is placed on mathematical problems and concepts relevant to financial and operational business applications, including regression, forecasting, sampling and statistical analysis. This course also lays the groundwork for more advanced study in finance and international business transactions in the fourth year.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0240 | Open
This course introduces general theories and principles of macroeconomics and the economy in aggregate terms. It investigates the interaction of government, business, and consumers as agents in the pursuit of growth, employment, and stability of prices, interest rates, and exchange rates. Students will learn about macroeconomics measurements, the self regulating economy and its critique and growth theory for example.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0301 | Open
This course explores the field and principles of sustainability and their impact on design and business, from cradle to cradle to the ten principles of One Planet Living for example. Students learn about life-cycle and life cycle analysis and get to understand what a sustainable business and design strategy entails.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0308 | Open
This class has a special focus on Intellectual Property Law. The course will cover the whole range of intellectual property rights, including but not limited to copyright, design, trademarks and patents. There will be a basic introduction to each of the intellectual property rights (in particular requirements for protection, scope, effects and term of protection), and some specific topics will be highlighted, for example fashion, perfume and visual arts. Later in the semester, students will explore the topic of liberty of expression and creation versus IP rights.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0313 | Open
Pre-requisite: Marketing, Economics 1 & 2, Strategic Design Management or equivalent(s).
This course is designed to study the impact of global economic models upon domestic economies. Issues explored include the impact of business on migrating populations, environmental movements, social climates, new technologies, and international trade agreements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0360 | Open
Pre-requisite: Design Research Methods or equivalent
In this Experience Design Studio, students will answer a design experience brief by generating and developing a design concept. Students put in practice all the skills learned so far, from human-centered design, project management to sustainable design and business. Presentations, readings, lectures, field trips and visiting designers will round out the coursework.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0415 | Open
The Arts & Culture Management senior year 2-credit course gives an overview of arts and culture professions, from art dealer to auction house operator, investigates how the art market operates and what are the changes that information technology brings about in terms of curatorial practices, fundraising and collection management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Design Management | Course #: FDMT 0453 | Open
Addressed to artists and designers who want to sell their art and design work, this course offers an overview of a variety of art and design business practices, how to get an agent, write a contract, make sure the images produced is under proper copyright. In this class, students will have the opportunity to meet and ask questions to experts in the various fields of art & design.
Contact Hours: 45

Fashion Design

2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0206 | Open
Pre-requisite: foundation core studios - semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course teaches fashion hand drawing techniques mainly from live fashion models; first it will focus on body proportions, body details and body movement to later concentrate on the stylized fashion figure, allowing students to synthesize and create their own ideas. Students will analyze the behavior of the fabric on the body, how different types of clothing hangs and reacts to movement. Volume and perspective will be a subject of study through lights-shadow and forth-shortening techniques, which help students to situate their fashion figures in the space and prepare them to design clothes as soft sculptures€, a bridge from 2D to 3D.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0208 | Open
Pre-requisite: foundation core studios - semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Practical application of appropriate computer software is a must to meet the demands of a hectic fashion market. This course explores CAD software techniques used in the fashion industry to enrich the possibilities of communication skills. Students will learn how to use vector drawings to create technical flats of garments, and basic rendering textile techniques to enhance digital image presentation.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0211 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Students are trained to fully explore and exploit various multi- and interdisciplinary sources in order to creatively apply investigative research to a conceptual design process. Students use sketchbooks as documentary tools and through market research gain awareness of fashion and design products and market categories as well as with current issues in international fashion. The second semester includes different methods and conceptual techniques for implementing effective design directions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0241 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0298 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0321 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
Junior Design Studio integrates draping and pattern making as a means of achieving the students own designs and realizing them as finished garments. Focus is on the process of executing a design concept from its 2D form, including layout, cutting, construction, fitting, and finishes. Through technical projects, students continue to develop their skills. In the second semester students follow professional sample procedures to develop a garment from an original design under the direction of the instructor and a external designer critic. At the end of the semester they produce a 3 look collection that serves as preparation and practice for collection line-up and time management.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0331 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore core studios - Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This class focuses on digital tools for fashion design and fashion illustration. Students use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to prepare concept boards and collection concepts completed with scanned sources and original artwork. Exploring a variety of digital design and presentation methods, students will focus on developing new design concepts for defined niche markets; project briefs will involve research and style analysis of a French couture house or a European luxury brand. Applying digital communication and presentation skills, students will develop a new contemporary vision for an innovative product range and their own graphic identity presented in a professional PowerPoint presentation.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0333 | Open
Pre-requisite: Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.
This course teaches students how to generate and develop various highly individual design concepts related to specific, identified market levels and product segments. Different principles of collection work and collection concepts are applied to set project briefs. Methods of presentation in relation to the fashion design portfolio enhance appropriate visuals for the fashion design process. Observational fashion, design, and trend research sketchbooks form part of this course, as well as external project briefs, which are reviewed and assessed by professionals from the French fashion and clothing industry (e.g. Designer Critic Project).
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fashion Design | Course #: FFAS 0415 | Open
This course is a survey of the professions needed in the fashion world, from the fashion designer, fashion photographer, to the person in charge of managing a fashion show and advertising the fashion brand. The ecosystem of fashion is vast! In this class, students will have the opportunity to meet and ask questions to experts in the various fields of the fashion business.
Contact Hours: 45

Fine Arts

3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core studios/2D Studio I
Working away from the stretched canvas to different structures and surfaces, exploring scale and more site-specific projects, introducing the notion of space within a 2D context, this course will address in class systematically formal painting issues, i.e.; texture, mark, scale, color, composition etc. These issues will accompany important themes in Contemporary Art without replacing them.

This undergraduate painting course aims to enable each student to pursue their ideas in and around painting in all its forms in the most committed, imaginative and experimental way. Work may manifest itself in a wide variety of different mediums and materials. This course engages with and contributes to the change and development in the expanded field of art. Although its core concern is with practice, it promotes the hybrid nature of current art practices by exploring the boundaries of, and the interface between, art and critical ideas. Furthermore this class aims to develop the individualization of the students' pictorial language.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0206 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core studios/Sophomore Sculpture 1
Following the first semesters discussions on independent practice, the spring semester will focus on strengthening students personal artistic language and ability to locate and isolate relevant research topics either through intuitive, logical or thematic thinking. Sculpture will be approached as a process of materializing and actualizing connection to Spaces and Objects (including politics, humans, histories...) and will reassess classical connotations of sculptural form by opening them to a wider range of issues coming from video, architecture, document and research approaches to art-making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0208 | Open
Pre-requisite: Foundation Core studios/Sophomore Drawing I
This course is designed to build on existing technical knowledge and skills, facilitating a more focused approach to the relationship between creative technology and practice. The course seeks to explore drawing within contemporary fine art practice. The workshops will focus on the process of drawing as concept, drawing as subject matter, drawing to create or define context, drawing as source and resource to develop a personal expressive language.

The aims of the course are to extend advanced and technical knowledge, to encourage a broad range of unfamiliar materials, process and to facilitate experimentation. Research methods will be introduced to support your projects and to encourage a critical approach/response to ideas. Instruction is delivered through studio sessions, site work, teaching events and demonstrations, and coordinates thematically with other coursework in the sophomore year curriculum.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0306 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year sculpture/Junior Sculpture 1
This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Core Studios/Studio Concepts 1
The Studio Concepts course challenges and encourages the students to explore the different creative processes and contemporary artistic practices. Open to research all media ranging from painting, drawing to photography and video, from objects, sculpture to installations and any un-familiar propositions, the students may experience and develop their ideas that emerge spontaneously out of experimentation and process. Through research and reference the students need to justify and document their ideas and proposals. The projects will include concepts and process; develop context and ideas.


The aim of the studio concept course is to encourage and enable students to create an individual and critical approach/response to ideas and tasks, spanning all disciplines and to assure an underlying connection to the student's construction and deconstruction of their chosen areas and personal practice.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0314 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Core Studios & Digital skills
The spring course will introduce students on the various concepts, methodologies and tools within the context of live video production, live performance and interactive installations. Students will approach the different possible temporal modalities of broadcast image: real time, deferred, linear or disruptive continuity and the influence of these temporal modalities on the space and place of the audience. Students will be introduced to the reference software max/msp/jitter, a graphical programming environment dedicated to the processing of media images, sounds and data.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0318 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year painting/Painting Interactions 1
In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training, the strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such a training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0319 | Open
The class is aimed to explore the medium (book), in all its meanings/forms, focusing on the relationships between the content and the container, the inside and the outside, internal and external structure(s).
A book is not content OR shape, but content AND shape. The materiality is part of the project.
In conceiving a piece in a book-form, the process has to take in account the permanent dialogue between all the elements composing the whole : texts, images, paper, ink, grids, typeface, chapters, titles, captions, format, size, number of pages... all this gathered in a hierarchy that takes the form of a network.
Starting with the decomposition of an existing book, going through the recomposition of the existing in a new form, to finally conceive and realize their own book, students will approach the medium with an apparent technical methodology, which will lead them to discover the almost endless richness and complexity of the book structure.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0328 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year drawing, advanced drawing skills
This course will focus on making drawings as a process of investigation and experimental practice. Through set projects students discover new forms of expression, possibilities for mixing media and ways to appropriate the act of drawing. Each exercise is contextualized and provides the starting point for discussion. Over the course of the Semester students will discover potential for their personal work and contribute to the design and content of the course in the Spring Semester. Classes include events and collaborations inside and outside of the school expected to generate new ways of thinking about drawing.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0334 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore year sculpture
This course will focus on the making of sculptural form and installation work with clay, in the art context, and shall encourage the use of varied mediums and materials to combine with clay. It is based on the exploration of different subject matters and the acquisitions of technical skills.
The first semester will be focusing on experimentations. An important part of the program is based on showing students how to work in a studio space and become independent.?This course will encourage personal research and creativity in the making, and push students in exploring, clarifying and exalting their personality and qualities.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0349 | Open
Pre-requisite: Printmaking I
This course engages more complex forms of printmaking, such as photo emulsion silkscreen, laser lithography and other forms of etching to encourage students to combine printing techniques. The course will be given in a workshop environment, using water based materials.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0350 | Open
An introduction to the concepts and methods of performance art, investing the historical dimensions of ephemeral art, and encouraging students in developing their autonomous practice in this field. The course encourages the presentation and articulation of personal projects and concepts. The course will serve as a platform for articulating, exchange and develop ideas and forms of expression through in class exercises. All aim to enhance individual skills in relation to public appearance/performance and public speech.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0358 | Open
This course takes the term 'creative writing' to mean: finding creative ways of using language not to establish a writing practice but exploring the possibilities of writing as a form of artistic expression in its own right. Through a variety of experimental writing processes and methodologies including notation, transcription, constrained writing and productive reading, students will engage with creative writing forms and respond within the context of their artistic practice and process. For example, students will make daily notations using drawing or sound, and observe how this process can produce a body of work without any written sentences. In other words, how we generate writing will be just as important to us as what those methods and procedures produce.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Arts | Course #: FFAR 0404 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: Junior Core Studios or equivilent.
Senior Concentration is the synthesis of studio practice and theory. Senior year students will work independently to produce a conceptually coherent body of work expressing their individual artistic identity. Tutorials, guest lecturers and group critiques offer guidance and support as students focus on their chosen media, modes of expression, and research interests. The coursework culminates in a student presentation, final exhibition and assessment by a guest jury, during which students must consider issues of self-editing, display, and public presentation.
Contact Hours: 45

Foundation

4.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0111 | Open
Building on the practical knowledge acquired in in Materials and Dimensions I students develop their ideas with more autonomy whilst being supported by the technical expertise of their instructors. In this course students focus on the relationship between design, process and final outcome in 2-Dimensions. After an introduction to color theory and symbolism, students learn about color through print. Students are taught to question and analyze the image-making process. Through set assignments students explore different media and techniques and learn how to select the most effective methods to communicate their ideas.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0112 | Open
Building on the practical knowledge acquired in Materials and Dimensions I students develop their ideas with more autonomy whilst being supported by the technical expertise of their instructors. With a specific focus on ‘The Body’ students are introduced to the many ways that the human form is central to art and design practices, whether it is in the design of clothes, products, buildings, or furniture. Students gain an understanding of the different possibilities for 3D Design (architecture, fashion, product design, furniture, fine art sculpture) Projects are based on investigations into how the physical structure, dimensions, and the functions of the human body inspire and direct the design of forms. The influence of context and environment on the generation and development of ideas will be essential to the work. Students experiment with the potential and limitations of materials and different material combinations.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0171 | Open
Students develop projects with a growing complexity, employing the computer less as a tool and more as a medium to be manipulated with greater confidence and control. The aim of the course is to create an awareness of the potential for digital techniques to solve visual and communication problems. Advanced skills are taught during the Semester that support and encourage an ambitious approach to the digital field. Students integrate digital and non-digital practice and explore mixing different software and media. All projects are contextualized with examples of work by contemporary artists and designers who are working with digital media. By the end of the course all students are confident to use digital tools as part of their creative work.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Foundation Courses | Course #: FFND 0177 | Open
Students require the fluency and confidence in the act of drawing developed in Drawing I in order to engage in more ambitious work. Professional drawing classes are designed to relate directly to art and design specialisms (Fine Art, Illustration, Fashion, Interior Design, Communication Design and Photography). Students are encouraged to take a self-motivated and questioning approach to drawing; equipped with the basic skills they become increasingly open to experimentation and the potential to communicate in many forms. Through a series of workshops stereotypical ways of thinking and seeing are challenged so that students understand drawing as an activity that continues to be relevant and re-invented.
Contact Hours: 45

Illustration

2.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0217 | Open
This course is a way for students to embrace both creation of characters and stylistic development. The goal of this class is to understand the codes of morphology, expression, body language and behavior and how the illustrator can play with them in a coherent, harmonious way. Students will be encouraged to reinforce or discover their own personal style and explore new visual inclinations. Successful work starts when you step out of your comfort zone!
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0219 | Open
Continuation and deepening of the Technical Drawing for Illustration I course, this course enables student to maintain and question their technical skills in order to use them in their illustration projects.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0231 | Open
This course can be considered as the second part of Digital Illustration (core course Sophomore Fall). Digital Illustration covers a large field of techniques: illustration bitmap, vector, work from scans or directly done on the computer).Advanced Digital Illustration pursues this introduction course (or develop skills acquired in other digital classes in other departments), developing a more stylistic and personal approach to digital illustration, for in a way setting up tailor-made recipes. The specificity of this course is about the instructor(s). The course is run by one professor as well as five guest lecturers that will share their experience and their secret recipes with digital softwares.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0232 | Open
This course, while being a studio course is as well an art history course. Working as an illustrator or cartoonist implies to know in which field and connected to what heritage you are working. Knowing from where you are coming from, where you are standing to be able to develop your own path, while being aware of your surrounding.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Illustration Worlds & Sophomore Illustration Concepts & Illustration Styles
This year long course further explores conceptual problem solving via the image. In the third year of study, the assignments are designed to further explore and develop conceptual skills. An emphasis is put on development of solving client specific assignments. The process of moving from concept to completion are emphasized. Verbal skills are strengthened through the explanation and the discussion of ideas and solutions. Problem solving, the evocation of the proper mood and the respect of deadlines are the key goals.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0329 | Open
An elective course open to students who would like to gain a deeper understanding and knowledge of digital illustration/image-making fields and concepts. This course is based on the development of personal project, experimenting with the editorial and/or the animation field, via digital tools.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0337 | Open
Beyond the scope of bande dessinee, this course seeks to explore and conquer new narrative fields offered to illustrators: print or online narrative, creation for new digital media, storytelling and installation. To highlight technical, narrative and stylistic capacities of each student, this course will combine a very direct approach followed by development of a personal project.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Illustration | Course #: FILL 0339 | Open
Animation has, increasingly, become a natural extension of illustrators' work. Building upon the knowledge and skills gained in Digital Animation (spring semester), students learn the practical approach of Stop Motion Animation. The skills taught in this course will allow students to produce animated shorts, opening/closing credits, animated web series and other time-based media.
Contact Hours: 45

Interior Design

4.0 Credits
Interior Design | Course #: FINT 0301 | Open
In Project 2, students will focus on the design of temporary retail and exhibition spaces, including trade show exhibits, pop-up stores or corporate / public events. The art of display, lighting, visual and sound communication, color schemes, and materials selection to generate a complete sensory experience for the customers / visitors will be emphasized. Guest experts and suppliers will introduce professional reality in this studio course.
Contact Hours: 45

Language

2.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FLIB 1001 | Open
This course is a beginner-level French conversation course open to students with no previous exposure to instruction in French. Class will meet twice a week for 1 hour. Emphasis will be placed on phonetics (rhythm, intonation, liaisons, silent letters & some specific French sounds), as well as everyday life vocabulary and exchanges. Different themes will be covered over the semester: life in Paris, French and Francophone cuisine as well as music. Students will be able to engage in short conversations and to describe themselves and their environment, their friends and family members, as well as their studies, hobbies and artistic practice. Visits and meetings with French students will be organized. Students will be evaluated during 5 oral presentations.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FLIB 1002 | Open
Pre-requisite: French 1 or equivalent. Exceptionally, students who are fluent in a roman language and students who are enrolled in French 1 (with approval from both professors) could also take the course.
This course is open to anyone who has some basic knowledge of French and would like to improve their listening & speaking skills. Class will meet twice a week for 1 hour. The main objective for the course is for students to be able to communicate orally in French in everyday life situations, as well as in professional settings. Using a variety of materials (movies, music, dialogues, radio & TV), students will learn how to tell a story, make a brief description of their work and practice, talk about a personal experience or a project, and give their opinion. 5 themes will be covered over the semester: intermediate everyday life vocabulary, French and Francophone cuisine, cinema, architecture and professional life in Paris. Visits and meetings with French students and professionals will be organized. Students will be evaluated during 5 oral presentations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FLIB 3400 | Open
Pre-requisite: Course taught in French - intermediate level required.
Ce cours a pour objectif de fournir aux etudiants les connaissances necessaires pour comprendre la culture francaise mais egalement d’approfondir leurs connaissances linguistiques. Le cours portera sur differents aspects de la culture francaise : faits historiques et politiques marquants, courants intellectuels, economie, mouvements artistiques et vie quotidienne. Les etudiants auront l’opportunite grace a des visites de se familiariser avec l’architecture et les monuments de la ville, mais ils pourront egalement decouvrir les institutions culturelles et artistiques ainsi que la vie professionnelle a Paris. Les discussions seront nourries par la lecture d’articles de journaux, par des analyses litteraires, des documents audio-visuels ainsi que grace a des rencontres avec des professionnels et historiens de l'art. Une partie du cours sera consacree a des revisions de grammaire et des exercices de composition. Le cours est dispense en francais. Pre-requisite: Placement
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FLIB 3411 | Open
Pre-requisite: French I, II
In this intermediate-level course, students will focus on their speaking, reading, listening and writing skills. Students will realize multimedia projects in French: illustrated articles, sound creations, video portraits, filmed interviews... The implementation of these projects will consolidate grammar and vocabulary, and extend students' written and oral communication skills. Projects will be published on the class website. French culture and literature will be used to develop critical thinking in a foreign language. By the end of this course, students should be able to communicate in French in simple real-life situations. Class will be conducted in French.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FLIB 4415 | Open
Pre-requisite: Course taught in French - intermediate/ advnaced level required.
Qu’est-ce que la critique de cinema? Nous essaierons, grace a la decouverte et a l’analyse de films connus et moins connus, de comprendre en quoi la critique est un type d’ecriture particulier et complexe. La critique peut en effet analyser un film, en reveler la structure narrative, les choix esthetiques, les decisions techniques et leurs consequences; elle peut aussi, quand cela s’avere utile, decrypter les facteurs sociaux et economiques qui sont en jeu lors de la production d’un film. Mais la critique n’est-elle pas surtout la volonte de partager une lecture personnelle d’un film, un regard, en retranscrivant avec des mots la complexite d’une oeuvre cinematographique, donc d’images en mouvement? Les etudiants seront ainsi amenes a discuter de films vus en salle, puis a ecrire chaque semaine une breve critique. Cette pratique d’ecriture permettra de cerner les difficultes qui lui sont inherentes, tout en faisant decouvrir le plaisir qu’une telle pratique peut procurer. Nous nous attacherons ainsi a retracer l’histoire de la critique de cinema en France, a voir des films et a analyser les critiques redigees sur chacun des films selectionnes. Les articles que nous etudierons sont issus de revues specialisees, de journaux ou de sites internet tels l’article d’Andre Bazin “Le decor est un acteur”, publie dans Cine-club en decembre 1949 a propos du film Le jour se leve de Marcel Carne ou encore un article publie en 2012 sur le site Critikat.com, http://www.critikat.com/panorama/hors-champ/mal-versus-bien.html, et dans lequel Arnaud Hee fait « dialoguer la reception critique » de deux films Amour de Michael Haneke et Into the Abyss de Werner Herzog.
Contact Hours: 45

Liberal Studies

1.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 0010 | Open
Paris Inside/Out is a one-credit course consisting of visits to art and design exhibits, as well as meetings with artists, artisans and designers in Paris. The course will use a wide approach by including a variety of artistic fields, thus allowing students to draw inspiration from any discipline. The course will be held every week in a different location in Paris.

Students are free to participate in as many visits as they wish, however a minimum of 5 visits are required to pass the course. A 1-page essay will be written for each visit, and must be submitted within two days of the visit, along with either a photo or an illustration. The professor will regularly select an essay that will be published in LOOP. At the end of the semester, students will be asked to present in class a personal work inspired by one of the visits during the semester.

This is a pass/fail course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1011 | Open
This year-long course is designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn to understand the inherent argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically, and to write more effectively by developing skills in the structure, grammar, and mechanics of writing. Students also work toward the more focused goal of situating design and art practices within larger intellectual, historical and philosophical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connection between ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various methodologies applicable to art and design, which can then be used to critique and analyze visual and material artifacts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1012 A | Open
This year-long course is designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn to understand the inherent argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically, and to write more effectively by developing skills in the structure, grammar, and mechanics of writing. Students also work toward the more focused goal of situating design and art practices within larger intellectual, historical and philosophical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connection between ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various methodologies applicable to art and design, which can then be used to critique and analyze visual and material artifacts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1104 | Open
This course will introduce students to the notion of the city as palimpsest and locus of cultural, social and economic exchange. It will expose them to a selection of those writers and artists who have travelled to and from Paris, and help them understand the role played by this city in relation to cultural and political centers throughout the world, in Europe, and beyond. Through urban history, students will learn about political migrations and colonialism, and about the importance of historical context to an understanding of artistic and literary movements, as well as about key moments in French history, from the Romans on, via the Middle Ages and the Revolution. Students will explore the city and will participate in class visits to several key monuments and museums as Arene de Lutece and Notre-Dame, the Musee Carnavalet, the Musee de Cluny and the Musee Guimet. A Reader tailored for this class will be provided.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1105 | Open
This course acquaints students with the neighborhoods, cultures, people, customs, institutions and organizations in Paris through a thematic approach based on three main modules: the city and its history; the literary and artistic representations of the city; the city, its citizens, and its future. Students will learn about key moments in French history, from the Romans on, via the Middle Ages, the Revolution, Haussmannization, and May 1968; they will be introduced to such themes as political migrations and colonialism, and will explore the city from a variety of points of views including literary and artistic exchanges, urban history, architecture, and ecology. Active exploration of the environment is strongly encouraged and learning is accomplished through a variety of means: site visits, the examination of texts and images, and first-hand encounters with museums, galleries, and libraries, as well as other art and design-related resources in the city.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 1150 | Open
French for Paris is a course open to beginners who would like to expand their knowledge of French culture and develop their listening & speaking skills. The course will cover specific themes relating to everyday life in Paris, its history, its culture and the arts. Emphasis will be placed on phonetics (rhythm, intonation, liaisons, silent letters & some specific French sounds) as well as everyday vocabulary and exchanges. Different subjects will be developed over the semester: cultural life in Paris, French cinema, French and Francophone cuisine, as well as music. Students will be able to engage in short conversations, and will practice describing themselves and their environment along with their studies and artistic practice. Visits in French will be organized. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (readings, targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics, etc.) Class will be conducted in French.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 2212 | Open
This course focuses on how design processes, design products, and design discourse are interrelated. It encourages students to reflect and write critically about design and provides them with a foundation in research methods that impact design practice. Readings from leading designers, theorists and historians lead students to situate their own approaches to design within a swiftly changing contemporary context, while visual materials and visits to design-related exhibitions allow them to broaden their base of design references.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Liberal Studies | Course #: FLIB 2250 | Open
Pre-requisite: Requires some prior knowledge of French.
“French Language and Culture” is a course open to anyone who has some knowledge of French and would like to improve their listening & speaking skills. The course will cover specific themes such as Paris and its architecture, French cinema, French artists and artistic movements, as well as professional life in Paris. Students will develop key vocabulary in order to be able to communicate orally in French in everyday life situations, as well as in professional settings. Using a variety of materials, students will learn how to tell a story, make a description of their work and practice, talk about a personal experience or project, and give their opinion. Four museum guided tours in French will be organized during the semester. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (readings, targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics, etc.) Class will be conducted in French. Pre-requisite: Placement
Contact Hours: 45

Photography

3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0211 | Open
Students are introduced to basic photography using color materials. Through a year-long study, they learn to master camera controls and film exposure in the format of their choice. Ambient and artificial lighting as well as their impact on various emulsions are examined with an eye towards producing high quality digital color prints, color C-prints and transparencies. Emphasis will be on developing a personal approach and vision using color materials. Exposure to historical antecedents, contemporary readings and criticism are integrated into the course.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0225 | Open
This portraiture course is designed to guide and assist the student during the various steps of the creative process. Students will propose a personal photographic project (outlined in writing) at the beginning of the semester and continue to work on it over the course of 15 weeks, culminating in a finished body of work for a gallery show or book. Students will receive feedback and guidance on a weekly basis and are guided individually in regards to personal photographic skill levels. The course will explore the theme of portraiture: self-portraiture, conceptual, candid and street portraiture. At the end of the semester, students will be asked to give an oral presentation of their work.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0231 | Open
Pre-requisite: Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisites for semester 2.
This seminar addresses the creative process as well as the technique and critique. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and field in order to create a personal project (16 images total) with the theme of " ", "Fine Art Photography inspired by science" or " " (the student can select one or more these themes as long as there is a total of 16 photographs produced for this class). I will be inviting the students to ‘make connections’- by exploring books, films, exhibitions, and discovering emerging talent in today’s fine art photography, mixed with appropriation and science inspired works. By semester’s end an elegant and cohesive 16 image photographic portfolio will have been produced. What is essential will be to deepen visual sensibilities and discover new ways of seeing. Prerequisites: Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisites for semester 2.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0233 | Open
Pre-requisite: Lighting Techniques 1
Part two of a year long course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio and also in an outdoor environment using multiple light sources while mixing studio electronic flash with outdoor light. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast and reflection. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments. The class is project based. The students will choose their projects from several themes: headshot/ portraits, nudes, outdoor flash portraits, and in-class still lifes.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0237 | Open
This studio course investigates a variety of photographic processes in print media, including digital print methods, photo-printmaking, xerography and manual print processes. Historical and theoretical relationships between the photographic image, appropriation strategies and print practice are discussed as a context for technical explorations in the media. Image and surface manipulations and materials, as well as theoretical concepts related to the subjects of language, installation and performance are applied to the process.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0258 | Open
Pre-requisite: Black & White Photography (or equivalent), Introduction to Digital Photography (or equivalent), Digital Skills & Composition (or equivalent)
This year-long course introduces students to the creative and technical possibilities of digital photography. Through demonstrations and hands-on sessions, students learn the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to produce effective digital photographs. Students are taken through all the basic processes encountered in digital workflow, from basic scanning and retouching, image enhancement, and printing fundamentals, to RAW file processing and photographic post-production methods.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0301 | Open
This is a year-long course building on the Freshman and Sophomore Seminars, serving as a critical and technical exploration of the language and theory of photography. Students will further develop their individual photographic statements while placing their work within conceptual and historical contexts. Students will work on only one project throughout the second semester, culminating in a body of work which will be presented at the end-of-the-term show.
Contact Hours: 45
2.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FHOT 0330 | Open
The Large Format Photography course is devoted to both the technical and creative use of the view camera. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and field to develop a personal project and perfect technical skills. I will be inviting the students to discover how the view camera is key to contemporary photographic practice by exploring books and exhibitions. By semester’s end an elegant and cohesive portfolio will have been produced. What is essential will be to improve technical skills and find new ways of seeing through large format photography.
Contact Hours: 45

Internship Opportunities
Visiting semester students at PCA have the opportunity to get involved in a wide range of short non-credit internship activities. This includes assisting at gallery events, fashion week, and working with individual artists in the city. Students return home with a unique and diverse resume of hands-on experience. Further details are provided to students upon arrival.

Course Concentrations & Portfolio Requirements
PCA offers the following concentrations. Students should be able to demonstrate some prior experience in their chosen concentration.

Studio Concentrations – portfolio required at application: 10-20 images, submitted via dropbox/web link

  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Fine Arts
  • Illustration
  • Interior Design
  • Photography

Other Concentrations – portfolio required at application (see detail)

  • Liberal Studies – portfolio: writing sample. This may be an assignment completed for a current or previous class; something that the student feels is a representative example of her/his current style and ability.
  • Design Management – portfolio: design analysis essay. 1 page essay analyzing a well-designed everyday object, product, building, publication, advertisement or software; include visual reference.

Courses & Schedule
PCA courses run Monday – Friday. SAI students are free to enroll in any combination of elective courses, but prerequisites must be demonstrated through students’ transcripts.

Course Registration

Students choose their elective courses after they have been accepted into the program. As soon as the PCA semester schedule is confirmed, students are asked to complete a Course Approval form, which is used to specify first-choice and alternate-choice courses. Students are free to enroll in any available courses, but most should be within their determined concentration. All posted schedules of classes are tentative and subject to change unless otherwise noted. After registration is complete, any schedule changes must be made during the add/drop period at PCA, which is typically the first week of classes.


Pre-Departure Calendar
October 1 2017
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
October 1 2017
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
October 15 2017
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
November 15 2017
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
December 1 2017
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
December 1 2017
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-Site Calendar
January 5 2018
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Charles de Gaulle (CDG) airport. SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 12:00 noon, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
January 6 2018
SAI Orientation
Mandatory SAI orientation is held at the SAI Paris office and introduces students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
January 9 – 11 2018
PCA Academic Orientation
PCA orientation introduces students to their school and professors, and includes activities to get to know classmates.
January 15 2018
PCA Classes Begin
Feb 26 – March 2 2018
Holiday (no class)
April 2 2018
Holiday (no class)
May 1 2018
Holiday (no class)
May 8 2018
Holiday (no class)
May 10 2018
Holiday (no class)
May 17 2018
End of Year Show
May 18 2018
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$21,200
Optional / Additional Fees:
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$3,075
Optional Visa Processing Service
Available for some jurisdictions.
$175
French Social Security enrollment (mandatory)
Paid to PCA upon arrival
Euro 230
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Paris
$900 $1,200
Visa
Visa fees, paid to French Consulate.
$200 $200
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
$100 $450
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$400 / month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $350 / month $450 / month
Transportation within Paris
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$125 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI weekend excursion
  • Frequent SAI cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Walking Tour
Students are welcomed to their new city through a walking tour of the many Parisian sites, including the Eiffel Tower and the Champs de Mars.

River Seine Boat Tour
Students take a boat tour on the Seine river catching a glimpse of the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, and Paris’s other famous sights. Following the tour the group takes a stroll along the Champs Elysées and coffee break.

Visit Musée Carnavalet & Walk Through the Marais
Students visit the Musée Carnavelet, a museum devoted to the history of Paris, followed by a stroll through the Marais: the Jewish district of Paris.

Weekend Trip to Bèziers
A former Roman colony dating back to 36 B.C., Bèziers, located in the southern Languedoc region, is known for its wine and bullfighting. Students spend the weekend exploring this ancient town, and catch a glimpse of the nearby Mediterranean Sea.

Night at the Theater
Students are invited to spend an evening enjoying a world-class performance at one of Paris’ prestigious theaters.

Day Trip to Reims in the Champagne Region
Students travel as a group by private shuttle to the city of Reims where they visit the numerous Maisons de Champagne in the region along the Route Touristique de Champagne. Students have the chance to taste and purchase Champagne directly from the producer. The trip includes lunch in a local French restaurant.

End of Semester Farewell Dinner
Students celebrate the end of a successful semester abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious French meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient, clean, and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (upgrade to private bedroom available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless internet. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Alternate Housing: Independent
Students seeking independent housing can do so, for a reduction in the SAI program fee. Please contact SAI for details. Students with independent housing are required to fill out SAI’s Independent Accommodation Information form.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 6 months after planned departure from France.

Student Visas
In accordance with French law students studying in France for 90 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Those with French/EU citizenship are exempted. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

Students must appear in person at the French Consulate to present their student visa application. Our Student Visa Office is available to assist students in getting ready for the appointment; SAI provides student visa consulting for all our students at no cost.

Please note that SAI is able to process visa applications (no trip to the Consulate required!) for students who live or attend school in some jurisdictions.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.