John Cabot University
Fall Semester Elective 2018
12 - 17 credits

Students studying at JCU select 4 or 5 courses from the wide range of disciplines offered for a total of 12 - 17 credits. Courses available include Art History, Business, Political Science, and Communication, among many others. Semester students have the option of enrolling in the SAI Global Leadership Certificate or Honors Program, or completing a part-time internship, to further their academic and community involvement.


Application Deadline
June 15, 2018
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
JCU Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Study with degree-seeking students from around the world
  • Earn a Global Leadership Certificate
  • Complete an internship

Program Dates
August 28, 2018 – December 15, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 85+ (internet based) or IELTS: 6.5+.



Art History and Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
Business, Law, Management, and Marketing
Business, Management, and Marketing
Classical Studies
Coming soon
Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science
Creative Writing, English Composition, and English Literature
Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language
Economics and Finance
Exp Courses
Foreign Languages
History and Humanities
Linguistics
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology
Spanish Language
Studio Art

Art History and Archaeology

3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 141 | Open
This survey course begins with the very birth of visual representation in the middle and late Stone Age (ca. 32,000 - 11,000 BC) and ends with Late Antiquity (ca. AD 250-400), when the transition from ancient to medieval art began to take shape. The focus of this course is on the art and architecture of the Mediterranean, Near East and Europe, including the first flowering of art on the islands of Greece and the spread of Roman art throughout the entire Mediterranean area. The different media, aesthetics, functions, and subjects chosen for representation in each culture will be studied in terms of the particular social, religious, political and geographical contexts of which they are a product. Students will also be introduced to the contemporary developments in other areas of the world: Asia, Africa, Americas. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 143 | Open
Pre-requisite: partially on-site
This survey course focuses on the art and architecture of Europe, South and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas from the late 1200s to c. AD 1750. The course investigates a range of media including painting, woodcuts, sculpture, and architecture, while considering materials and methods of production. Special attention will be given to the socio-economic and political contexts in which these artifacts were commissioned and produced. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 144 | Open
This comparative survey will cover the development of art from the 18th Century until today. While the emphasis is on Western art, important examples of Asian, native American art, African, and Oceanic art will be included. Where cross-cultural influences are evident, they will be noted. The most recent art is connected to globalization and to new technologies. In this broad context, students will come to understand new aesthetic languages, traditional cultural sources, and philosophical background of contemporary art. The course begins by reviewing artists associated with the Enlightenment, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism, and continues with the myriad of movements of the twentieth century, up until today. All media are considered, including photography
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 196 | Open
A survey course covering the innovations of the Early Renaissance to the High Renaissance (14th into the 16th Century). The works of Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Ghiberti, Masaccio, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante and Raphael and others will be studied.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 220 | Open
This is a survey of Greek art and archaeology from the Bronze Age through the late Hellenistic period. The course begins with an introduction to the Minoans and Mycenaeans; cultural and artistic developments are traced through the 2nd century BC when the Hellenistic kingdoms began to fall into the hands of Rome. Analysis of architecture and art are merged with an understanding of historical trends and Greek mythology.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 240 | Open
This course is about the art of writing about art, and surveys notable examples. As in any historical study, our understanding of art history is filtered through specific writings. These writings can to be appreciated in themselves for their sensitivity, originality, and craft, and also evaluated critically. In this course we search out authors who achieve sensitive description of works of art of many diverse styles and periods, who vividly communicate the intellectual and emotional responses triggered by visual experience, and who skillfully delineate art's historical and cultural context. This course is appropriate for beginners in art history.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 251 | Open
The nineteenth century in Europe was a period in which the idea of picture making was radically altered, notions of the function of sculpture transformed, and new styles and types of architecture invented. Artists and architects found exciting new solutions to the cultural, political and economic pressures of a "modern" society. This course will investigate trends in art of the later 18C to ca. 1880; though some emphasis will be placed on French painting, we will also study art and architecture of the period in England, Germany, Spaiin and Italy. The goal is not to present a summary overview, but to concentrate on the issues central to major movements - Neoclassism, Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism - through investigation of selected examples of representative works within the social and political contexts in which they were made. Also to be addressed will be the art-historical debates that scholars have offered concerning the protagonists of these movements and the interpretations of the works themselves.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 280 | Open
Focuses on the major artistic centers in Flanders, France, Germany and Holland in the 15th and 16th centuries. Special emphasis is given to the works of Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and Campin in the 15th century and to those of Derer, Bosch, Grenewald and Bruegel in the 16th. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the growing exchange of artistic ideas between Northern Europe and Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 283 | Open
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the modern and contemporary world. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Open
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Open
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 298 | Open
Pre-requisite: (On-site: activity fee 25 euros or $33)
Rome City Series - An on-site course that enables the student to visit many of the major and minor monuments of Baroque Rome - churches, palaces,piazze, etc. - and thus to study firsthand important works by such artists as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio and Pietro da Cortona, among others. On site activity fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 354 | Open
In ancient Rome portrait depictions functioned as a sign of individual identity and they were a striking component among the multitude of statues that adorned public and private buildings, and lined the streets and piazzas of the city. Portraiture hence furnishes key insights into the mind-set of ancient Rome. Representation could take many forms, physical resemblance and insight into personality being the most obvious. Particular traits could be emphasized to stress beauty or heroism, to indicate adherence to (or reaction against) the past, and hairstyles and clothing could be used to accentuate social status. As such, portraits were important markers of social and political persona. They could be displayed for self-promotion, to honor the powerful or to perpetuate memory thereby attaining an almost magical quality as substitutes for the individual and could be honored or punished accordingly. The course will examine Roman portraiture as objects of self-representation discussing the artistic choices of their depiction and the social and historical context of their creation. In-class lectures will be complemented by site and museum visits to take advantage of the many artworks still extant in Rome. On-site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 379 | Open
The course explores Contemporary Art via slide lectures, gallery walks, and encounters with artists, critics, curators, dealers, and museum professionals. The first part of the course will offer on overview on the past 50 years and will introduce to the contemporary art scene, by first treating the prominent art movements (Pop Art, Fluxus, Arte Povera, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Transavanguardia, Video Art, Public Art, Relational Art).

The classes will then concentrate on tendencies and interests dealt with in recent artistic practice, more specifically on the use of the moving image as an artistic device. Video Art will be analyzed in its historical context and in its present use. We will focus on Video Art’s connection to photography, cinema, TV, documentary, and the deconstruction of video as a language through artistic experimentations, while reflecting on present systems of beliefs and ideals.

A part of the course focuses on visits to galleries, artist's studios, museums, foundations, not-for-profit spaces and foreign cultural institutes. An actual connection with the contemporary Roman art scene will be offered. Current methods of critical practice, in the form of magazine reviews, essays on contemporary art, documentary films will be studied and practiced.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 385 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History or permission of the instructor
For decades the question "What is American about American art?" stood at the center of American art history. American painting consequently has been studied and interpreted for its putative relationship to American identity or to aspects of national self-image. Though this paradigm is now questioned, it remains deeply embedded in the study of American art. By studying the paintings along with key essays, the course will examine the historiography of American art as well as the artworks. It will analyze the paintings and the debates about their relationship to socio-political contexts that are thought to be particularly American. It will also consider the significant influence on American art by Italian artistic traditions and American ex-patriot artists.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing AND at least a GPA of 3.0
Internship in the field of Art History obtained through the Career Services Center
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing AND at least a GPA of 3.0
Internship in the field of Art History obtained through the Career Services Center
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 460 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; intended for JCU Degree-Seeking AH students, but advanced visiting students studying AH are welcome.
This upper level seminar/practicum provides rigorous, practical preparation for the writing of professional art-historical research papers, including the Senior Thesis, through four discrete units: an individual portfolio review; a research tools and methods seminar; intensive, directed bibliographic research; and the formulation of a presentation to the class on the thesis topic, together with a new 'foundation' portfolio demonstrating mastery of the research skills, competencies, and bibliography necessary for advanced art-historical research writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 480 | Open
Thesis supervision for Art History majors in their final year. Students select their research topics in consultation with their thesis advisor.
Contact Hours: 45

Arts and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Theater and Film Studies | Course #: DR 101 | Open
During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively; employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.; develop an expressive speaking voice; engage with a variety of stage props; analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage; critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques; define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater; develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society; understand the responsibility of an actor s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors; initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Theater and Film Studies | Course #: DR 101 | Open
During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively; employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.; develop an expressive speaking voice; engage with a variety of stage props; analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage; critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques; define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater; develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society; understand the responsibility of an actor s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors; initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Law, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 219 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course provides the student with an overview of the law in general, beginning with the foundations of the legal and regulatory environment, the law making processes, and the implementation of the legal rules. Students examine some areas of substantive law, including bodies of law that are regulatory in nature. Particular attention is given to aspects of business transactions in an international context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 321 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
Students in this course explore basic legal principles in reference to business conduct. The course begins with an examination of the common law of contracts, followed by Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods, the legal characteristics of partnerships, limited partnerships, and corporations (including limited-liability companies), secured transactions, and the law of bankruptcy. Students must have Junior standing to take this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 323 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course deals with legal aspects of international business transactions. The course introduces students to issues in international commerce, including requirements of a contract, international shipping terms, and liability of air and ocean carriers. The course will examine international and U.S. trade law, including GATT 1994, and the regulation of imports and exports. Finally, the course will familiarize students with various areas of regulation of international business, such as competition law, employment discrimination law, and environmental law.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the filed of Law obtained through Career Services Center
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a "free market," the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of "ethical" consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 305 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non business majors.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EN 110, MKT 301. Recommended: MGT 301
This course surveys the theory and practice of public relations, examining a model for public relations programming, the principles of public relations writing, and stakeholder/issues management techniques, together with their ethical implications. It distinguishes PR and publicity communication concepts within the framework of the firms overall marketing communication strategy and organizational mission. Special topics, such as Marketing Public Relations, Investor Relations, Government Relations, etc., will also be addressed. Students are expected to be able to use primary and secondary research and the information tools of communications professionals.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 202. Recommended: MKT 301
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course aims to provide students with a theoretical and practical background to develop their personal skills to manage negotiations in multicultural environment. The course will explore leadership and communication approaches to effective negotiation management, and will highlight the role of innovation in achieving integrative, successful results. Students will have an opportunity to explore the meaning and practice of managing negotiations. During the course, they will review theory, analyze strategies, engage in practical exercises and acquaint themselves with the language, thought, and praxis of negotiations in the multicultural setting in which we live, learn and work. By studying the impact of the relations between their and others’ cultural narratives, the student will discover innovative paths, techniques, and strategies to lead negotiation processes in multicultural environments.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 498 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of all core courses required for International Business
This heavily case-based capstone course will enable students to integrate and consolidate previous learning and examine in-depth real-life issues of policy, competitive advantage and barriers to trade; regional and global strategy; the challenges and benefits of operating and managing internationally and cross-culturally; and the major ways in which international business is currently changing, with a consideration of the implications for future business graduates.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/CMS 361 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
The course aims at exploring strategies of social media management for business organizations. The focus of the course regards not only the aspects of communication with prospects and customers, but also the internal processes necessary in order to enact strategic decisions. Hence, this course analyzes every stage required to use social networks for business from a global perspective that includes, among others, IT, customer service and sales, in the light of the social, economic, and technological implications surrounding the ever-changing e-business environment
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/CMS 361 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
The course aims at exploring strategies of social media management for business organizations. The focus of the course regards not only the aspects of communication with prospects and customers, but also the internal processes necessary in order to enact strategic decisions. Hence, this course analyzes every stage required to use social networks for business from a global perspective that includes, among others, IT, customer service and sales, in the light of the social, economic, and technological implications surrounding the ever-changing e-business environment
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Business obtained through the Career Services Center
Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid.

The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC).

After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
The course examines human personality, behavior and relationships as applied to business, industrial and organizational settings. Topics include: social systems at work; human needs, attitudes, human relations; leadership patterns, group dynamics, teamwork, communication, motivation, participation and reward system; technology and people, managing change, models of organizational behavior and management. Teamwork and group participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocations of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design. facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Management obtained through the Career Services Center
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 426 | Open
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
This is an introductory course in Comparative Business Cultures in a context of International Business and Management, covering the work of Clyde Kluckholm and Fred Strodtbeck, Gary Ferraro, Bjorn Bjerke, Fons Trompenaars, Geert Hofstede as well as the G.L.O.B.E. project. The emphasis in this course is on understanding and applying one'™s knowledge of different national cultures as an aid to improved management of human resources, enhanced cross border trade, relocation of business activities to different countries, as well as on the œmelding of different cultures in multinationals as well as companies which are involved in joint ventures, mergers, or take-overs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 498 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of all other business core courses.
Focuses on the role and responsibilities of the Chief Executive Officer, which call for leadership, integration across functional areas, organizational development, strategy formulation and implementation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, MA 208
This course provides students with an understanding of the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of goods and services. Major areas: selecting target markets, market positioning, and marketing mix strategy. Skill development in demand/competitive analysis, value creation, teamwork, and effective communication. Teaching methodology is case study-based and group work is emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 302 | Open
This course offers key insights into the rapidly growing service sector industry. The course is challenging and requires students to apply their knowledge and skills for the effective management of service design and delivery. Central issues addressed in the course include identifying differences between service and product marketing; understanding how customers assess service quality/ satisfaction; applying the GAPS model to assess service failure; and understanding of the theory of relationship marketing and using related tools and techniques for keeping customers and encouraging loyalty.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 304 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course investigates the process of new product management, starting from idea and concept generation through to project evaluation and development. The course is designed to be a workshop for new product development, allowing students to explore market opportunities and propose new concepts to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 305 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301; Recommended: MA 209
Basic methods and techniques of marketing research. Designing a marketing research project: research question formulation, primary and secondary data collection, data analysis, and report presentation. Focus group interview, questionnaire construction, statistical analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
Social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing the behavior of consumers. Models of buyer behavior, consumption patterns, market segmentation, attitude formation and change, brand loyalty, adoption of innovations and store choice decisions. Implications of consumer research for marketing management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses
the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 321 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EN 110, MKT 301
Advertising as applied in industrialized countries. Its impact on the social and economic status of the consuming public.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, MKT 301
This course approaches Internet marketing from a marketing management perspective. The course looks at the Internet both as a tool to be used in the marketing planning process and as an element of a company's marketing mix. The course explores how traditional marketing concepts such as market segmentation, research, the 4Ps and relationship marketing are applied using the Internet and other electronic marketing techniques. Website design is not covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 355 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301.
This course introduces students to the conceptual frameworks, ethics, and practice associated with social marketing. This course explores how classic marketing techniques can be effectively applied beyond traditional corporate settings, in not-for-profit organizations. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles of social marketing, and then will address fundraising and resource development as well as social communication campaigns. Fundraising is the application of marketing principles to generate funds that enables not-for-profit organizations to achieve their objectives and cover their expenses. Social communication campaigns deal with creating awareness of the not-for-profit organization’s mission and services and influencing specific target audiences to behave differently for a social purpose. At the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of the financial analysis needed for program management and performance review. The course offers students a valuable opportunity to implement the marketing concepts in an original and growing sector, where the objectives are broader than simple profit maximization, and social, ethical and political factors play a major role.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 490 | Open
Pre-requisite: Marketing Majors: Senior standing and completion of all other marketing core courses. Business Majors: MA 208. Recommended: MKT 301, MKT 305, MKT 310
This course involves analytical integration of material covered in previous marketing courses. The course develops skills in diagnosing marketing problems, formulating and selecting strategic alternatives and recognizing problems inherent in strategy implementation. Requires the assessment of an existing product or service using both primary and secondary research tools and the development and presentation of a comprehensive marketing strategy.
Contact Hours: 45

Classical Studies

3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 260 | Open
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities, and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 278 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 278 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 362 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EN 110
The course will examine the development of Roman law from the Twelve Tables through the Justinian Code. Readings and discussions of the political and social conditions of the Roman Republic and Empire will contextualize the study of the evolution of the law. These will include chapters from Livy's History of Rome, Cicero's defense and prosecution oratory, as well as selections from Pliny, Tacitus, and others. There will be considerable secondary readings on special topics. Students will be required to analyze cases in the Roman Law of property, the family, torts (delicts), and personal law. The final part of the course will consider the developments of Roman law since the Justinian Code in the Civil Law Tradition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 480 | Open
Thesis supervision for Classical Studies majors in their final year.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Open
This course tells the story of Italy and Rome from the Late Iron Age (8th Century BCE) to the end of the Roman Empire in the west (476 CE). The course will cover the culture of the Etruscans, Western Greeks, and the ancient peoples of Italy that dominated the peninsula for many centuries. Along the way we will study the semi-mythical Kings and later Emperors. We will look at the development of the expanding Roman Empire both across the Alps and the Mediterranean, and its great wars of defense and conquest. We will pay particular attention to the most exciting and best documented generations, those of the Civil Wars that started the decline of the Republic, and of the Julio-Claudian Empire that ended it. We will also examine the institution of the Empire by Cesar Augustus, its flourishing well into the second century CE, and its evolution and decline.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 255 | Open
This course explores the multi-ethnic dimensions of the Roman world with a particular emphasis on the Imperial period (31BCE-476 CE). From Rome's beginnings, its population was characterized by cultural diversity, and one of the Empire's greatest strengths was its ability to integrate diverse peoples into Roman political, social and cultural life. Nevertheless, as the Empire expanded into Europe and the Mediterranean, many peoples who came under Roman rule continued to maintain distinctive ethnic, social and cultural identities. In this course, we will explore the complex processes of social and cultural negotiation between local identities and Romanization that resulted from Roman expansion. In doing so, we will seek a better understanding not only of how and why the cultural identities of such groups differed from mainstream Romanitas, but also the ways in which these interactions contributed to the shaping of Roman identity.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/RH 372 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
An examination of the nature, purpose, and place of rhetoric in classical antiquity, as conceived and practiced by ancient Greeks and Romans. Readings (in translation) include the use and conceptualization of an art of persuasion by Gorgias, Plato, Isocrates, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Cicero, Quintilian, and Augustine. This course prepares students to evaluate the use (and abuse) of devices and techniques of classical rhetoric in contemporary politics, economics, marketing, media, and visual arts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/RL 288 | Open
This course is a survey of the elements of traditional religion in the Graeco-Roman world. It is designed to introduce student to the tenets, beliefs, and spiritual practices of classical antiquity and to familiarize them with the social, cultural and political background surrounding ancient religion. Among the topics covered are the range of religious expressions in Greece and Rome, including the approach to the divine, ritual practices, and the organization of time and space. While the first part of the course is dedicated to Greece, in the second half we will concentrate on Roman religion both as a phenomenon in and of itself and as a factor integrated in the socio-political organization of the empire.
Contact Hours: 45

Coming soon

0.0 Credits
TBA | Course #: TBA 1 | Open
Fall 2018 courses coming soon! Please refer to the Fall 2017 programs for a general list of course offerings.
Contact Hours: 0

Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism

3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Open
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 331 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course examines the various media systems, both news and entertainment, from the southern Mediterranean all the way to Iran through screenings of films and television programs from the region. The topics to be covered include the motion picture industry, news and entertainment media, including satellite TV, magazines, newspapers, internet, and alternative media and their role in the perception and practice of Middle Eastern politics and culture. Special emphasis will be put on questions of gender as well as the use of the media by social movements and the ways these transform the institutional arrangements between the media, publics and governments, both nationally and transnationally.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Open
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication. In addition, Students should begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement, support it through a specific line of reasoning, and organize their support effectively and efficiently.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 111 | Open
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Open
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Open
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 101
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 230 | Open
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 311 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occurring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic and social issues raised by digital media forms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 398 | Open
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page White Paper presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a pass/no pass basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registra’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of three 300 level COM or CMS courses.
This course is designed to be the capstone experience in analysis of media and media texts through specific theoretical constructs. Theories covered include semiotic theories of Saussure, Bakhtin, and Barthes; deconstruction theories and critical theories; and theories of spectatorship using psychoanalytic models. Further, the course provides students with experience in performing sustained and in-depth analysis of complex signifying operations and their relationship to ideological functions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of three 300 level COM or CMS courses.
This course is designed to be the capstone experience in analysis of media and media texts through specific theoretical constructs. Theories covered include semiotic theories of Saussure, Bakhtin, and Barthes; deconstruction theories and critical theories; and theories of spectatorship using psychoanalytic models. Further, the course provides students with experience in performing sustained and in-depth analysis of complex signifying operations and their relationship to ideological functions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 480 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of three COM or CMS courses at the 300 level
This senior capstone course culminates the coursework in communications by focusing on the study and application of ethical standards in a variety of communication environments. Classical and alternative ethical frameworks are explored in order to evaluate and respond to communication problems in the context of global media and cultural citizenship. Through the analysis of case studies, students explore how the structure of media organizations impact ethical decision making and learn to develop self-reflective media practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: DJRN 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisite: EN 110; Recommended: DJRN 221
This course focuses on the in-depth reporting required to unearth today’s biggest news stories, the ones which powerful interests would prefer to keep hidden. The students will be required to make sound news decisions, make sense of complicated matters, develop leads and contacts to further their stories, and publish the results of their reportage in a relevant news outlet.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: DMA 333 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 230
Many contemporary television sitcoms, news programs, variety shows, and events are shot with a multitude of cameras and are often cut and mixed live for instantaneous broadcast. This course prepares students for work as part of a multi-cam production team by giving them hands-on experience developing content for multi-cam production, prepping broadcast-ready assets, coordinating and executing live shoots, and live-streaming content on a variety of online platforms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 314 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
Myth is an extremely slippery word that has developed such a vast semantic range it is fruitless to try to recover an original or more authoritative meaning. Myths can be considered universal and timeless narratives describing human existence, or geographically determined stories reflecting essential features of a specific culture; vehicles of absolute truths or ideologically unsound delusions. Probably in the West today the word is principally used to describe a story, character or object which is entirely fictional and which should be revealed as such.

And yet mythology, the body of inherited myths in any culture, is at the core of narrative processes and any new text recasts one or more fundamental myths for the society that develops it, renewing its validity for the society itself. It seems to be impossible for human beings to organize their experiences into narratives without recurring to the same patterns.

The presence of narrative paradigms is often particularly visible in media products aimed at children, and refashioning myths for the new generations is also an ideological enterprise: shaping the minds of the young was always one of the principal ways of creating a cohesive society. Tracing the use children's media make of traditional myths provides a valuable observation point from which to survey the relationship between media and audience.

This course will be looking into how myths, considered as universal narratives, find their way into contemporary media products, by using the animated feature films produced by Disney.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 318 | Open
The course will be devoted to comix (understood as both serialized comic strips and comic-books) and the more contemporary format of the "graphic novel". Other forms of graphic storytelling, ranging from tapestries to children"s book illustrations to the underground graphic productions of the counterculture, will also be investigated, including traditions of sequential art in a global context. An initial historical contextualization will be followed by analyses of the form"s specificity through a number of theoretical perspectives (including visual culture studies, critical theory, narrative and narration, authorship, ideology, postmodernism, fan cultures and reception), allowing students to critically engage the works as texts. The relation of the specific visual culture of comics with other mediums -particularly the cinema and gaming- as well as its influence in other realms of popular culture will also be explored.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
Using contemporary theoretical approaches, this course examines both Race and Gender as social constructions, and the role and function of Cinema and Television texts in circulating and contesting those constructions. Focusing on analyzing Cinema and Television texts for their construction of meaning, this course looks at the complex ideological operations at stake in the operations, maintenance, and resistance to meanings constructed around race and gender.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: COM 221 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
The course introduces students to the various kinds of writing they will encounter in the media professions and in digital multimedia production, and prepares them for more advanced media courses in the Communications and Media Studies program. Students will also be introduced to basic legal and ethical issues, such as libel, copyright, privacy. Activities include writing for online media, press releases, strategic campaigns, and short scripts for visual and audio media as well as exercises to pitch their ideas. They will also explore issues concerning style, communicability, and effective storytelling.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 321 | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 360 H | Open
Pre-requisite: A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required. COM 220
Using contemporary theoretical approaches, this course examines both Race and Gender as social constructions, and the role and function of Cinema and Television texts in circulating and contesting those constructions. Focusing on analyzing Cinema and Television texts for their construction of meaning, this course looks at the complex ideological operations at stake in the operations, maintenance, and resistance to meanings constructed around race and gender.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of at least 3.0 and Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/EN 326 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110; recommended COM 210 and/or one previous course in Literature

This course will provide students with an introduction to postcolonial studies. The first part of the course will offer an overview of the most important topics constituting the field of postcolonial studies. These will subsequently be analysed through the theoretical debates that have grown around them. Furthermore, the course will look at how such issues have been expressed in literary and filmic texts. Topics include colonial discourse analysis; the issue of language; physical and mental colonisation and oppositional discourses; the concepts of 'nation' and nationalism in relation to culture and media; questions of gender in relation to empire and nation; diaspora, cosmopolitanism and identity; the problems of decolonization and the post-colonial state. Emphasis will be placed on colonial and postcolonial texts in the Anglophone and Francophone world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 241 | Open
This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles. (This course carries 3 semester hours of credit.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 199 | Open
This is a course in basic photojournalism on location. There will be both classroom sessions and classes off campus, held on location in Rome and the surrounding area, as well as visits to photographic exhibitions. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of photography and photojournalism; how cameras and lenses work; image composition; lighting conditions and techniques; shooting on location; techniques for working as a photographer; editing and producing photographs; and building a portfolio of images. Class sessions will cover learning use of a camera, lights, composition, color, documentary and candid photographic techniques, photographic software such as Adobe Photoshop, and critiques. Classes on location include practical fieldwork.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 221 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course introduces writing and reporting techniques for the mass media. It focuses on the essential elements of writing for the print, online and broadcast media. The course also covers media criticism, ethics in media, and the formats and styles of public relations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 325 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110; Recommended: JRN 221
This course offers the student practical experience researching, writing and marketing feature articles for print and/or online magazines. The topics covered include how to develop a good idea, analyze a target audience, gather information, write a feature article, and sell the story. Ultimately
this course will teach students how to successfully write longer feature stories and how to pitch them to the appropriate publication. The class time will include lectures where voice, style, use of language, and story structure techniques will be discussed. Class time will also include in-class writing and discussion
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 398 | Open
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page White Paper presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a pass/no pass basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 230
This course leads participants to acquire an understanding of the director's conceptual approach from script to screen. At the same time, the class will enable students to test and develop the practical and communicative skills that are needed in order to direct audiovisual productions. Such competence is indispensable when working on short- and long-format projects in a film, TV, and other creative and commercial contexts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page White Paper presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a pass/no passbasis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 434 | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45

Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science

3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 101 | Open
The course offers an overview of Computer Science. The history of the subject and the main areas of both accademic and industrial research are discussed. In particular, the course offers an overview and a gentle introduction to the basic concepts and methods in the following branches of computer science: Theory of Computation, Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence, Networks and the Internet, Database Theory and Bioinformatics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Open
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Open
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Open
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Open
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 131 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS 130
The course provides students with the technical knowledge required to deal with the professional process of designing, developing, installing and maintaining a business web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 230 | Open
This introductory course provides an overview for visual representation of data. It is designed to cover the differences between infographics and visualization. Through both theory and applied practice the course covers specifics related to basic graphic design, online publishing, and corporate communication as it relates to large amounts of data and visually representing data in creative and meaningful ways.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 302 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS 101
This course is designed for the general student to provide an overview of artificial intelligence (no computer programming skills are necessary). This course will discuss intelligent agents and the building blocks of artificial intelligence: knowledge bases, reasoning systems, problem solving, heuristic search, machine learning, and planning.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 100 | Open
This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities.

The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 100 | Open
This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities.

The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 101 | Open
This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.
This course is a review of intermediate algebra and has few prerequisites other than elementary familiarity with numbers and simple geometric concepts such as: finding the least common multiple of two or more numbers, manipulating fractions, calculating the area of a triangle, square, rectangle, circle, etc. Its objective is to prepare students for Pre-calculus.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 197 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to Calculus that focuses on the study of elementary functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, mainly oriented towards practical applications in business and economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on functions as the first step to analyzing real-world problems in mathematical terms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities, and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; and an introduction to hypothesis testing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 209 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of Statistics I. Topics include more advanced hypothesis testing, regression analysis, analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, time series analysis, and decision-making techniques. CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or higher.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 299 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 198 with a grade of C- or above
The course is a further development of Calculus and at a more advanced level. After covering traditional topics such as techniques of integration, differential equations and the study of several variables, attention is given to business and economics applications (constrained optimization, Lagrange multipliers, Method of Least Squares, Numerical approximation, Taylor series, etc.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 491 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 198
This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102
Students will learn about at Food and Agriculture, focusing on these subject areas.
Domestication of major animals and crops (timing and place, in order to set the scene for when humans made major steps in controlling and managing their food supply), the First Agricultural Revolution.
Common Food Commodities which are important today.
Grains (concentrating on wheat, corn, and rice, and then where grown, population served, cultivation requirements).
Bananas
The Green Revolution.
Examples of, and the Pros/Cons of Genetically Modified (Crop) Organisms—Amflora, Golden Rice, Insecticide Sweet Corn.
Sugar: crop sources and sugar substitutes.
Food for Export, e.g. Coffee, Cocoa.
Fertilizers, synthetic and organic.
Oils: palm oil, …olive oil.
Minor but Essential Crops, e.g. Leafy Green Vegetables.
Crop Pests, Diseases and Pesticides, imminent threats: e.g. wheat rust
Modern Industrial Agriculture to Organic Farming, examples.
Biofuels or Food: ethanol from sugar cane and corn, palm oil.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 290 | Open
This course provides the liberal arts student with an introduction to the scientific issues which underpin human health in the urban environment. We study components of the urban environment by using basic concepts from ecology, biology, chemistry, and geology. We then learn about "linkages" (or interactions) between humans and their physical, chemical, and biological environment in order to understand human health in the urban environment. The interactions examined will relate to actual conditions found in major cities in the 21st century: we look at water supply and quality, air quality standards, energy supplies, and common diseases.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, and English Literature

3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 205 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or permission of instructor
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to develop the creative, editing, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction. Students will read contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, critiquing classmates work, and producing their own fiction.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 350 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or permission of instructor
This class is proposed for those who want to explore the pleasures and rigors of writing fiction. Throughout the course writing exercises, reading and discussing one another s writing in workshop format, as well as developing a portfolio of writing, will be required. The emphasis is on literary development as both a reader and a writer.

This course will enhance the students ability to do the following:

-To understand the importance of elements of the craft: image, voice, character setting and story
-To read examples of published fiction, as well as examples of student works
-To develop skill in writing and revising fiction
-To practice and develop discussion and analysis skills through written and oral assignments
-To learn self-motivation for developing your writing from an idea into a polished final draft
-To appreciate the development and revision processes of creative writing
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 352 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This creative writing workshop is designed to help students develop their writing and editorial skills, as well as the reading habits necessary for the production of works of creative nonfiction. The class will focus upon the creative process and the generation of several different forms within the nonfiction genre including
the personal essay, the memoir, travel writing, and the journalistic or magazine profile. Through the examination of superior examples of creative nonfiction, discussions, and critiques, students will become acquainted with the techniques and tools used to build an excellent portfolio of literary and journalistic pieces within the creative nonfiction genre.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DJRN 346 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DMA 334 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above.
Writers' Room is an immersive workshop-style course that places students in the shoes of a television writer working to break a season's worth of story and write a screenplay that advances the program's plot and develops its themes while maintaining characterization and tone consistent with the vision of the showrunner. Students will learn how to pitch ideas, collaborate with others writers (giving and taking notes) and express themselves in the voice of the show. The course covers the economic, historical, and aesthetic foundations of contemporary television writing and production and will prepare students to evaluate, develop, and pitch series ideas for episodic television, evaluate and develop episode ideas in a collaborative working environment in line with the tone of the show and produce effective written material (pitches, summaries, show bibles, screenplays) that adhere to professional standards.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DMA 348 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
This creative writing workshop helps students to develop the creative, editorial and reading skills needed for the production of a screenplay, based on the following principles: focus on visual story telling using minimal dialogue, introduction to story analysis using published screenplays and clips, and the exploration of narrative development. Material will be presented in the form of lectures, discussions, handouts, writing exercises, as well as screenings. In the context of a creative writing workshop, students will complete in-class and at home writing exercises. Students will also be required to provide their fellow writers with thorough feedback. Finally, students will pitch ideas in preparation for a full script, to be presented and critiqued at the end of the term.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 110 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of EN 103 with a grade of C or above OR completion of EN 105 with a grade of C or above
This course reinforces the skills needed to write well-organized essays, focusing specifically on argumentative essays. Elements covered include thesis development, critical reading, organizing and outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and citation and documentation standards. Techniques of academic research and the use of the library and other research facilities are discussed. In addition to regular in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments, students are required to write a fully documented research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to fulfill the University English Composition requirement and to be eligible to take courses in English literature. Individual students in EN 110 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 200 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
Presupposing no previous knowledge of literature, this course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in four genres, poetry, short story, drama and novel. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned text, use various critical approaches and write critical essays on the specified readings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 205 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or higher
The course traces various developments in the genre of the novel from the 17th to the 20th centuries through a reading of selected representative texts. In addition, students are required to consider these works alongside of the development of theories about the novel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 205 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or higher
The course traces various developments in the genre of the novel from the 17th to the 20th centuries through a reading of selected representative texts. In addition, students are required to consider these works alongside of the development of theories about the novel.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 211 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
By examining short stories, this course develops students'™ critical abilities in reading and writing about narrative fiction. The students are introduced to a comparative perspective on literature and learn to identify and evaluate the short story'™s formal elements, acquiring the skill to read fiction critically, to look beyond the content, to appreciate the ambiguities and complexities of the literary text, and to communicate their findings in critical papers of academic quality. The selection of short stories may vary, offering a historical perspective, a thematic one, or a selection of masterpieces in the genre.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 215 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above and one previous literature course
Designed as an introduction to the theoretical approaches to literature, the course will stimulate students to think and write critically through the study of the principal topics of literary theory. The course will adopt both a historical approach, covering each theory in the chronological order of its appearance on the scene, and a critical approach - putting the theories to the test by applying them to a literary text. The course will also help students to move on to an advanced study of literature by introducing them to the research methods and tools for the identification, retrieval, and documentation of secondary sources.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 223 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
The course deals with the development of American Literature from the mid-17th century to modern times, with an emphasis on the creation of a distinctive American "voice." Attention will be given to writers in the Puritan period and the early Republic, as well as to those who contributed to the pre-Civil War "American Renaissance," the rise of Realism and Naturalism, and the "Lost Generation." EN 110 or EN 112 with a grade of C- or higher.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 231 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of the survey begun in EN 230, this course deals with works by major British writers in the period 1660 to 1832. Approximately equal attention is devoted to writers of the Restoration (excluding Milton) and 18th century, and to writers of the Romantic Movement.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 245 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or EN 112 with a grade of C or higher and one previous course in English literature.
The course examines selected plays of Shakespeare, with emphasis on Shakespeare's development as a dramatist and his techniques of character development. Major critical approaches to the plays are discussed. About ten plays are examined. For example: Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Othello, Measure for Measure, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 285 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
To supplement the traditional university study of composition and literary analysis, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills at reading literature as a source of help in improving their own creative writing. Designed primary for students interested in creative writing, the course focuses on the reading of literature from the point of view of the practice, or craft, of fiction writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 299 | Open
An in-depth treatment of a area of special concern within the field of English composition and/or literature.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 308 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instruction
The course deals with novels selected in terms of a particular theme or a particular period of time within the 20th century as, for example, the development of the traditional theme of romantic love in the first or the second third of the century. The novels studied may include both works written in English and works in translation. One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 315 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor
This course explores in some depth a particular period, theme(s), or genre in American Literature. Students study the major historical and cultural contexts out of which the works grew. An important aim of the course is to deepen students' knowledge of a certain topic through a choice of representative writers and works. The course may be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 315H | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor
This course explores in some depth a particular period, theme(s), or genre in American Literature. Students study the major historical and cultural contexts out of which the works grew. An important aim of the course is to deepen students' knowledge of a certain topic through a choice of representative writers and works. The course may be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 346 | Open
The course will concentrate on the achievement of a single important English writer of the last two centuries: the chosen writer might, for example, be Keats, Dickens, Browning, or Joyce. As part of the required work, each student will select an individual research project for a class report. One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 399 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor
An in-depth treatment of a current area of special concern within the field of English Literature. Courses offered previously include: Dickens and Englishness; Race, Class, Gender, Culture: The American Dream in Literature; The Innocents Abroad: Perceptions of Italy in American, European and British Writing; Topics in World Literature: Masterpieces in Western Fiction. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 480 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing.
Thesis supervision for English majors in their final year.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language

3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN 235 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course explores the themes of crime and punishment in modern literature, with particular emphasis on the treatment of guilt (and the attendant concepts of legal and moral responsibility) as it is experienced by the individual consciousness of the perpetrator, of the accused, and in the relation between jailer and prisoner. Students in the course will see how literature, through its unique methods and concerns, is able to alert the reader to different understandings of the social, moral, ethical, and philosophical implications of what is only apparently a simple dichotomy between innocence and guilt, right and wrong, or good and evil. Each text or group of texts will be accompanied by an introductory definitional or theoretical reading from thinkers like Foucault, Benjamin, Arendt, and Nietzsche, that will serve not as an explicatory key, but as a guiding light in an exploration of the texts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of English Literature obtained through the Career Services Center; Does not count as a major elective for the English Literature major
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN 470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This is a course in research methodology and practices for the development of a thesis in English Literature. The course is intended for English literature majors in their penultimate term. Students will be introduced to the practicalities of thesis writing. Starting with the identification of a viable research topic, students will learn to articulate their research question/s, will identify and assess scholarly material to formulate a literature review, will engage with appropriate theoretical frameworks, and produce an annotated bibliography. Students will present and critique each other’s thesis proposal, research methodology and choice of material. By the end of course students will possess the research foundations that will allow them to write their thesis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN/ITS 295 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
The course is an introduction to a critical reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy in its historical, philosophical, religious, and poetic contexts. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise seek to identify Dante’s stylistic and thematic contributions to the literary world as well as to understand their relationship with medieval politics, philosophy, and culture. This course is taught in English.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN/ITS 295 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
The course is an introduction to a critical reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy in its historical, philosophical, religious, and poetic contexts. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise seek to identify Dante’s stylistic and thematic contributions to the literary world as well as to understand their relationship with medieval politics, philosophy, and culture. This course is taught in English.
Contact Hours: 45

Economics and Finance

3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102 Recommended: EN 105
This course introduces the students to the basic principles of microeconomics and the study of the behavior of individual agents, such as consumers and producers. The first part of the course reviews the determinants of demand and supply, the characteristics of market equilibrium, the concept of social welfare, and the consequences of price controls, taxation, and externalities on social welfare. The second part of the course deals with market theory, with a review of cost concepts and market structures: competition, monopoly, oligopoly and imperfect competition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA102 Recommended: EN 105
An introduction to the basic principles of the macroeconomy such as: national income accounting, determination of national income, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, macroeconomics in the open economy, and economic growth.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202, MA 198
This course delves deeper into the foundations of microeconomic theory, and analyzes the subject from a theoretical rather than practical point of view. Students will become familiar with the tools used by microeconomists in the analysis of consumer and producer behavior. The first part of the course reviews consumer theory and discusses budget constraints, preferences, choice, demand, consumer s surplus, equilibrium, externalities, and public goods. The second part of the course reviews producer theory: technology, profit maximization, cost minimization, cost curves, firm and industry supply, and monopoly.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 302 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202
The subject matter of this course is the nature and determination of a country's most important measures of economic well being: aggregate output and unemployment, and of a series of related variables such as inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates. The course presents a few economic models that can be used as tools to understand the behavior of these aggregates, as well as to evaluate alternative economic policies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, MA 208
This course applies microeconomic theory and statistics to management problems of a firm. It bridges the gap between purely theoretical economic models and the day-to-day decisions that managers face under conditions of uncertainty and scarcity. The focus is on the optimal utilization of resources within organizations, and the material covered offers a powerful tool for managerial decision-making. A sample of topics to be examined are demand theory and estimation of demand functions; business and economic forecasting techniques; production theory; cost analysis; market structure; strategic behaviour and pricing; risk analysis and capital budgeting; government-business relations and the global economy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 316 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior in standing, EC 201, EC 202
An introduction to international trade and finance. Analysis of the causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Major topics include: international trade theory, international trade policy, exchange rates and open-economy macroeconomics, and international macroeconomic policy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 328 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 301; Recommended: MA 208
This course examines incentive mechanisms at work in a wide range of environments to see if and how coordination can be achieved by informing and motivating individual decision makers. It also examines the performance of agents hired to carry out specific tasks, from taxi drivers, employees, to CEOs.
Students will be introduced to a range of economic tools used to study models that explicitly involve contracting in economics and finance under imperfect and asymmetric information. The methods developed can be employed to investigate the performance of various institutions (e.g., voting schemes) to see if they enhance general well-being. Techniques studied include agency theory and signaling models. In addition, some applications of the tools will be covered (e.g., labor market, credit market and insurance markets).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202, or MA 209
Econometrics is the use of statistical tools to test economic models. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of econometrics, and will provide them with hands-on practical experience in the field. The course starts with a review of statistical tools and matrix algebra, and continues with the analysis of simple and multiple regression, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Some of the teaching time will be spent in the computer lab, where students will learn how to use the EViews econometric software package.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 372 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
A study of the economics of money, banking, and financial markets in today's international marketplace. Major topics include both micro and macro analysis of financial markets and institutions, determination of interest rates and exchange rates, and monetary policy in both a domestic and international context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, GPA of 3.0 or higher
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 480 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing.
Thesis supervision for Economics majors in their final year.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: EC 310H | Open
Pre-requisite: Pre-requesisites: EC 201, MA 208
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: EC 345 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202
This course follows selected topics of current and historic interest regarding European economic integration. Emphasis is placed on monetary and fiscal problems as well as competition policies and the regulatory environment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: EC 380 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202
This course addresses the main economic problems concerning the environment, to equip students to analyze policies concerning water and air pollution, energy, climate change, and human health. This course combines theoretical analysis with discussions of such specific topics as sustainable development and international cooperation, renewable energy, and state-of-the-art production technology.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: EC 385 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 201
This course examines the economic effects of digital technology and e-commerce. The purpose of the course is to analyze the changes brought about by these technological advances and the effects such changes have had, or are expected to have, on economic agents such as consumers and workers as well as on the structure of economic markets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: EC 490 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC301, FIN301, MA299. Recommended: MA 491
This is an advanced course that makes substantial use of mathematical methods. In general, the topics covered can be viewed as that subset of general equilibrium theory which focuses on complete and incomplete financial markets and their impact on the allocation of consumption goods and efficiency. The course focuses on the operation of financial markets and pricing of financial assets. In the first part of the course, basic techniques and principles of decision making under uncertainty will be developed. These principles will then be applied to portfolio selection problems in financial asset markets. Microeconomic models of financial asset markets and their implications for valuation of stocks, bonds and derivative assets will be examined. The analysis will explore the impact of risk and ambiguity on asset prices and allocations in asset markets. For the most part, it will be assumed that there are two dates and a single consumption good. This basic setting is suitable for the study of the relation between risk and return on securities, and the role played by securities in allocation of risk.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 201 | Open
Introduction to basic accounting methods and concepts; preparation of principal financial statements; application of accounting principles to the main asset, liability, and owners' equity accounts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201
This course focuses on the role of accounting in the management process and where accounting can provide critical support to management decision making. Cost-volume relations are introduced, along with identification of costs relevant to management decisions. Process costing and job costing systems are covered. The development of a master plan, preparation of flexible budgets, and responsibility accounting are covered, and the influences of quantitative techniques on managerial accounting are introduced.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201, FIN 202, EC 202, MA 208
This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations necessary for making decisions in financial management. Main topics include the financial system, international financial markets, efficient markets, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation, capital budgeting, and capital structure management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 302 | Open
Topics include financial analysis and planning, capital structure, capital budgeting, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions. The course will cover extended case studies to apply theory of financial management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
The course emphasizes the structure and analysis of international capital and financial markets, Euro-currency financing and the financing of international transactions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201, FIN 202, and FIN 301; Junior standing
Despite the frequency and magnitude of Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) activity, M&As have a poor track record of success. Building on the premise that what happens after the deal is signed is as critical as the deal-making itself, in this course the student will research general literature, case studies, and practitioner experiences to build the knowledge necessary to address the financial, strategic and organizational challenges of acquisitions, with a view to realizing the promise of value creation. Specifically, the course explores the role of M&As in corporate strategy, domestically, overseas and across borders. It also reviews the fundamental building blocks: identification, valuation, negotiation, due diligence, deal structuring, financing, and integration.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Finance obtained through the Career Services Center
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45

Exp Courses

1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1002 | Open
Pre-requisite: IT 302 or permission of the instructor
This is an introductory course to teaching Italian as a second language to adult speakers. This is a course which covers theories as well as techniques and practice for the teaching of Italian. It will consider teaching methodology, lesson planning, learning contexts, the role of the teacher, the teaching of the four language skills, the teaching of the three language systems (grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation), the error analysis and the verification and evaluation. Students will also be provided with assisted lesson planning, observed teaching practice, and oral and written feedback. Students will be supervised during their training at John Cabot and will have the opportunity to put in practice the theory in real university classes.

F 9:00-1:00 PM [Course meets on: Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, Nov. 3rd, and Nov. 17th]
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1003 | Open
Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL scale

This course explores the stories and the experiences of Italian American immigrants as they traveled to America and began their new lives. It aims to analyze the various narratives concerning Italian immigration to the United States between the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century. We will explore different moments and issues relating to the immigrants’ experiences through short stories and poems, films, documentaries, essays and various original documents.

F 9:00-12:00 pm [Course meets on: Sept. 8th, Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, Nov. 3rd, and Nov. 17th]
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1004 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL scale.

The main goal of this course is to prepare students for their career: the course provides students with an understanding of the mechanisms regulating the job market as well as uncertain, competitive and challenging work environments. The course is also a tool to learn the art of personal branding; students learn how to develop individual soft skills such as leadership style, communication skills, and organization skills. The course prepares students to successfully enter the job market; participants will learn about the different interviewing techniques and will learn how to apply for a position in an effective manner. In the end, attention is given to external relationships and professional network: the course explains how to build and maintain professional relationships, and how to handle conflict in the working environment.

F 9:00-1:00 PM [Course meets on: Sept. 8th, Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, and Nov. 3rd]
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1004 | Open
Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL scale.

The main goal of this course is to prepare students for their career: the course provides students with an understanding of the mechanisms regulating the job market as well as uncertain, competitive and challenging work environments. The course is also a tool to learn the art of personal branding; students learn how to develop individual soft skills such as leadership style, communication skills, and organization skills. The course prepares students to successfully enter the job market; participants will learn about the different interviewing techniques and will learn how to apply for a position in an effective manner. In the end, attention is given to external relationships and professional network: the course explains how to build and maintain professional relationships, and how to handle conflict in the working environment.

F 9:00-1:00 PM [Course meets on: Sept. 8th, Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, and Nov. 3rd]
Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1006 | Open
Pre-requisite: Partially on-site; refer to the complete syllabus for activity fee details
Travel photography is the art of documenting places, people and traditions in a manner that the image itself narrates a feeling of time and place, and a portrayal of the art, and landscapes and societies it engages with. Technically, travel photography also hones skills in dealing with diverse light conditions and settings. A sense of history and observation, and an eye for composition and action are hence integral aspects of this type of photography. The course provides a practical engagement with the challenges of natural light photography, and an analytical appreciation of the language of travel reportage photography.

F 9:00-1:00 PM [Course meets on: Sept. 8th, Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, and Nov. 17th]

Contact Hours: 15
1.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1008 | Open
This course originates from the contemporary concern for ecological issues and, therefore, addresses how the hand of man has creatively, productively and artistically managed the natural environment under the inspiration of philosophical principles. It will first consider the philosophical ideas of Epicurus (the “philosopher in the garden”) and then how these ideas further inspired the creation of great Renaissance gardens, many of which are in and near Rome. There will be two extended visits to these gardens in Lazio: the Papal gardens in Castel Gondolfo and the Villa d’Este in Tivoli, or the Villa Lante near Viterbo. Garden layout, botany, design and themes will be all examined in the course.

F 2:00-6:00 pm [Course meets on: Sept. 8th, Oct. 13th, Oct. 20th, and Nov. 17th]
Contact Hours: 15
3.0 Credits
EXP One Credit Courses | Course #: EXP 1014 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL scale
Contact Hours: 45

Foreign Languages

4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 101 | Open
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in French. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Nnote: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or FR 101.
A continuation of FR 101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory French I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or FR 102.
The course is designed to study in-depth the following grammar points: verb tenses in the indicative and subjunctive moods, sequence of tenses, relative pronouns, and the use of prepositions and conjunctions. It concentrates on consolidating specific communicative tasks, including stating opinions and constructing hypotheses, in both speaking and writing. Specialized vocabulary is expanded and appropriate variables in register are introduced in expository writing and conversation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or French 201
A continuation of French 201. While continuing the review of grammar, the course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills in the context of the French and francophone culture. Literary readings, newspaper articles, and films, are an essential component of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
German Language | Course #: GER 101 | Open
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in German. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to German culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening
comprehension, reading, and writing. This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
German Language | Course #: GER 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisite: Placement or GER 101

A continuation of GER 101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory German I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: GRK 101 | Open
Instructor: TBA
This course is a first introduction to the study of the Ancient Greek language. It is designed to equip the student with the basics (grammar, vocabulary, syntax) of the Ancient Greek in its most widely known form, that of the dialect of classical Athens.

The aim of this course is to give a thorough introduction and preparation for reading original texts written by Aesop, Menander, Xenophon and others. Being an introductory course, no knowledge of Ancient Greek is assumed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 101 | Open
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 101
A continuation of IT 101, this course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. Placement is required or IT 101.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 103 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is the equivalent to 101 and 102 and carries 6 semester credits
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
This six-credit course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of language study (Introductory Italian I and Introductory Italian II). The course is designed for highly motivated students who wish to develop communicative ability in Italian in a relatively short time.
Italian 103 is conducted mainly in Italian. Students must actively participate in class activities and participation is necessary to determine the final grade.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 102 or IT 103
A continuation of IT 102, this course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 102 or IT 103
A continuation of IT 102, this course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 102 or IT 103
A continuation of IT 102, this course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 201
A continuation of IT 201, this course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills. Readings include short stories and newspaper articles.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 203 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is the equivalent to 201 and 202 and carries 6 semester credits. Prerequisite: Placement, IT 102 0r 103
This six-credit course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of intermediate language study (Intermediate Italian I and Intermediate Italian II). The course is designed for highly motivated students who wish to consolidate their communicative ability in Italian while developing reading and composition skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 202 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to develop the student's ability to write correctly in Italian while reinforcing oral communication skills. Contemporary texts provide the basis for class discussions geared toward expanding vocabulary and reviewing grammar. Students write weekly compositions, do oral presentations and keep a journal.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 302 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 301 or permission of instructor
In this course students will be guided through a variety of types of writing and styles (e.g. journalistic, business and professional, essay.) Although mainly designed for advanced non-native speakers, the course may also be taken by native speakers who wish to improve their writing skills. Students will reinforce their knowledge of grammar and syntax as well as develop vocabulary. In addition, students will learn fundamental writing techniques such as organizing ideas, selecting examples, drawing conclusions and using the appropriate style for the given genre or mode of discourse.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 301 pr permissions of the instructor
The course will introduce students to the study of Italian literature; it is designed for those students who have reached 300-level proficiency in Italian language and also functions as a preparatory course for those who wish to study Italian literature at higher levels. The first part of the course focuses on a preliminary explanation of basic literary terminology and teaches students to recognize codes and genres in a limited selection of Italian literary texts. In the second part of the course, students will read samples from significant works of Italian literature in conjunction with selected passages from the canon of Italian literary criticism. They will practice their critical and writing skills by applying the concepts learned during the course to the analysis and reading of the literary texts under consideration. At an introductory level, students will begin to appreciate the difference between commentary and criticism and between both historical and formal approaches to the study of Italian literature.
Contact Hours: 60