John Cabot University
Spring Gap Semester Elective 2018
12 – 15 credits

SAI Gap Programs are designed for high school graduates and offer access to university-level learning paired with unique exposure to the local community and culture. SAI gap semester students at JCU enroll in one Italian language course, one elective course with a focus on developing global awareness, and additional elective courses for a total of 12 - 15 US credits. Students benefit from program services geared toward gap students, including the Global Leadership Exploration Program, in which students complete community service, gain exposure to a range of career fields, and receive personalized guidance and mentoring from SAI staff on leadership, cultural competency, and value setting.


Application Deadline
November 1, 2017
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official high school transcript
Academic letter of recommendation
Passport scan (photo page)
JCU Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Explore unique college courses and fields
  • Develop independence and leadership skills
  • Spend an unforgettable semester finding inspiration

Program Dates
January 9, 2018 – May 5, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

High School GPA:* 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 85+ (internet based) or IELTS: 6.5+.



Art History and Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
Business, Law, Management, and Marketing
Business, Management, and Marketing
Classical Studies
Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science
Creative Writing, English Composition, and English Literature
Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language
Economics and Finance
Foreign Languages
History and Humanities
Music
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology
Spanish Language
Studio Art

Art History and Archaeology

3.0 Credits
Archeology | Course #: AH 271 | Open
Instructor: Ilaria Gianni
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Archeology | Course #: ARCH 101 | Open
Instructor: Jens Koehler
Monday 2:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Partially on-site; activity fee: €25 or $33
This course is an introduction to archaeological research, focusing predominantly--but not exclusively--on Classical Antiquity, i.e. on Italy and the Mediterranean. Various methods of recovery of ancient monuments will be explored, like radar survey, aerial reconnaissance and underwater archaeology. There will also be a focus on the changing interests of the discipline by an overview of the history of archaeology, from the first scientific excavations in the 18th century to new approaches in the last years. Finally, the presentation to the public (restauration, museums) and problems as illegal digging and trading will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 142 | Open
Instructor: Lila Yawn
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
This comparative survey of the arts of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the period between c. 300 and 1400 C.E. aims to equip students with a global mental map of artistic developments in their broader cultural-historical contexts, with special attention to major religious traditions and to the differing media, aesthetics, and representational and functional needs that characterized them. Particular emphasis will be given to Western Europe and Byzantium; the Islamic world; Tibet and Nepal; Mayan and Andean cultures; and Southeast Asia, China, and Japan.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 143 | Open
Instructor: Laura Foster
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: partially on-site
This survey course focuses on the art and architecture of Europe, South and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas from the late 1200s to c. AD 1750. The course investigates a range of media including painting, woodcuts, sculpture, and architecture, while considering materials and methods of production. Special attention will be given to the socio-economic and political contexts in which these artifacts were commissioned and produced. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 144 | Open
Instructor: Erick Wilberding
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
This comparative survey will cover the development of art from the 18th Century until today. While the emphasis is on Western art, important examples of Asian, native American art, African, and Oceanic art will be included. Where cross-cultural influences are evident, they will be noted. The most recent art is connected to globalization and to new technologies. In this broad context, students will come to understand new aesthetic languages, traditional cultural sources, and philosophical background of contemporary art. The course begins by reviewing artists associated with the Enlightenment, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism, and continues with the myriad of movements of the twentieth century, up until today. All media are considered, including photography
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Crispin Corrado
Thursday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Jens Koehler
Thursday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Elisabeth Fuhrmann-Schembri
Monday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
This on-site course examines Roman visual culture in Italy from c. 800 BC to c. 400 AD by focusing on the most important surviving sites in Rome and its environs as well as the areas hit by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. A focus throughout the course is the development of Roman cities and towns, their plans and topography, their public monuments and their political, economic, social, and religious institutions. We will also study private architecture: from the aristocratic city-house to the country villa to middle class homes. In addition to formal descriptions of the structures, there is a strong emphasis on the role of the monument in ancient society. The course will be conducted entirely on site. There is a mandatory field trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum (equivalent to two class meetings).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 196 | Open
Instructor: Paul Tegmeyer
Tuesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
A survey course covering the innovations of the Early Renaissance to the High Renaissance (14th into the 16th Century). The works of Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Ghiberti, Masaccio, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante and Raphael and others will be studied.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 223 | Open
Instructor: Inge Hansen
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
A survey of Roman architecture and art (sculpture, wall painting, mosaics and crafts) produced in Italy and the Roman provinces between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD. The course addresses such themes as: changing styles and techniques, practical and symbolic function of art and architecture, what it meant to be Roman in a multicultural Empire, and the notions of commemoration, remembrance and nostalgia.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 273 | Open
Instructor: Martina Caruso
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
This is an introduction to photography as both a historical and contemporary form of art and communication. While essential to the understanding of modern art, the history of photography also illuminates fundamental aspects of the image-dominated culture in which we live. The course is broadly chronological, and includes the invention and early reception of photography, its function as an independent art form, its uses in other arts, scientific investigation, reportage, photojournalism, portraiture, and other fields, and its relationships to major 19th and 20th century art movements. Contemporary photography is treated extensively.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 278 | Open
Instructor: Karen Georgi
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Twentieth century art consists of well-known Modernist and Postmodernist styles and movements such as Cubism, Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, installations and earthworks, to name a few. It also encompasses lesser-known movements such as the American urban realists, the Regionalists, Soviet Socialist Realism. But what does Modernism mean and how does it relate to the century’s dramatic modernization of daily life, social organization, commercial development, political and cultural nationalism, and two World Wars? Through an analysis of the art, artists, and critical discourses in question, the course will consider the fundamental questions: what is art’s relationship to the larger culture? What is the artist’s role in society? What do aesthetic concerns have to do with life? While these questions are always pertinent, they demand particular attention in the century largely defined by the ideology of art’s autonomy, pure creativity, and individual expression. Extensive visual analysis will be accompanied by attention to the critical discourses with which the aesthetics were defined, giving students the chance to develop an understanding of key 20th century styles but also to learn how these styles communicated historically.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Crispin Corrado
Tuesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Elisabeth Fuhrmann-Schembri
Wednesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Inge Hansen
Thursday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Inge Hansen
Thursday 2:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 293 | Open
Instructor: Laura Foster
Wednesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: (On-site; may have an activity fee)
Rome City Series - The urban development and architecture of modern Rome are perhaps the least studied aspects of the city's history. The 150th anniversary of Italian unity, celebrated in 2011, and recent work on architecture under the Fascist regime have created a new interest in Rome as a modern capital. To many foreign visitors, however, the contemporary city is simply a frame through which to see monuments of a glorious but distant past. This course will examine the vast transformations in the urban and architectural development of Rome that took place between 1870 and 1945, with special look at the new role that they city's historic monuments, from antiquity to the 18th century, played in representing the city as the capital of a modern nation-state and as the emblem of a new empire under Mussolini. We will also consider contemporary urban questions: Why has there been so little modification to the center of Rome since the 1940s? What space is available for new construction and how do contemporary architectural projects relate to those of the past? These questions and others will be explored through in-class lectures and on-site exploration of the city.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Anna Tuck-Scala
Monday 2:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Paul Tegmeyer
Wednesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 298 | Open
Instructor: Laura Foster
Tuesday 9:15 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-requisite: (On-site: activity fee 25 euros or $33)
Rome City Series - An on-site course that enables the student to visit many of the major and minor monuments of Baroque Rome - churches, palaces,piazze, etc. - and thus to study firsthand important works by such artists as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio and Pietro da Cortona, among others. On site activity fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 367 | Open
Instructor: Sharon Salvadori
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: One course in Art History
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the medieval world.
Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken
more than once for credit with different topics
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 373 | Open
Instructor: Anna Tuck-Scala
Tuesday 2:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Pre-requisite: One course in Art History or permission of the instructor.
Caravaggio (1571-1610) provides a noteworthy case study of how an artist'™s fame changes over time when the works of art do not. Best known for his striking representation of light and use of naturalism, his anecdote-filled biographies led to a negative assessment of the artist and his works. The course looks at the artist's output from an array of historical, thematic, and methodological points of view. The aim is to arrive at an understanding of Caravaggio's works within their historical context from the 17th century to the present day. This course is composed of 30% on-site classes, with a mandatory overnight field trip to Naples (activity fee €25 or $33).
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 383 | Open
Instructor: Carolyn Smith
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: One previous course in art history or permission of the instructor.
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the modern and contemporary world. Courses are normally research-
led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 460 | Open
Instructor: Lila Yawn
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; intended for JCU Degree-Seeking AH students, but advanced visiting students studying AH are welcome.
This upper level seminar/practicum provides rigorous, practical preparation for the writing of professional art-historical research papers, including the Senior Thesis, through four discrete units: an individual portfolio review; a research tools and methods seminar; intensive, directed bibliographic research; and the formulation of a presentation to the class on the thesis topic, together with a new 'foundation' portfolio demonstrating mastery of the research skills, competencies, and bibliography necessary for advanced art-historical research writing.
Contact Hours: 45

Arts and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Theater and Film Studies | Course #: DR 101 | Open
Instructor: Gabrielle Ford
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively; employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.; develop an expressive speaking voice; engage with a variety of stage props; analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage; critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques; define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater; develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society; understand the responsibility of an actor s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors; initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Law, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 219 | Open
Instructor: Chiara Magrini
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course provides the student with an overview of the law in general, beginning with the foundations of the legal and regulatory environment, the law making processes, and the implementation of the legal rules. Students examine some areas of substantive law, including bodies of law that are regulatory in nature. Particular attention is given to aspects of business transactions in an international context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 321 | Open
Instructor: Chiara Magrini
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
Students in this course explore basic legal principles in reference to business conduct. The course begins with an examination of the common law of contracts, followed by Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods, the legal characteristics of partnerships, limited partnerships, and corporations (including limited-liability companies), secured transactions, and the law of bankruptcy. Students must have Junior standing to take this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 323 | Open
Instructor: Chiara Magrini
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course deals with legal aspects of international business transactions. The course introduces students to issues in international commerce, including requirements of a contract, international shipping terms, and liability of air and ocean carriers. The course will examine international and U.S. trade law, including GATT 1994, and the regulation of imports and exports. Finally, the course will familiarize students with various areas of regulation of international business, such as competition law, employment discrimination law, and environmental law.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the filed of Law obtained through Career Services Center
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: MGT 345 | Open
Instructor: Luca La Mesa
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
TBA
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Michele Favorite
Tuesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Thursday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Michele Favorite
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Michele Favorite
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Teresa Triglia
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 301 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Tom Bailey
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a "free market," the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of "ethical" consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 301 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Tom Bailey
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a "free market," the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of "ethical" consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 305 | Open
Instructor: Silvia Pulino
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non business majors.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 330 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Colin Biggs
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 202. Recommended: MKT 301
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 330 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 202. Recommended: MKT 301
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 340 | Open
Instructor: Teresa Triglia
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course aims to provide students with a theoretical and practical background to develop their personal skills to manage negotiations in multicultural environment. The course will explore leadership and communication approaches to effective negotiation management, and will highlight the role of innovation in achieving integrative, successful results. Students will have an opportunity to explore the meaning and practice of managing negotiations. During the course, they will review theory, analyze strategies, engage in practical exercises and acquaint themselves with the language, thought, and praxis of negotiations in the multicultural setting in which we live, learn and work. By studying the impact of the relations between their and others’ cultural narratives, the student will discover innovative paths, techniques, and strategies to lead negotiation processes in multicultural environments.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 345 | Open
Instructor: Riccardo Maiolini
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course emphasizes the contextual and contingent nature of contemporary working-life and general social activities within the setting of business enterprises. Increasingly, highly skilled individuals, building and using information and communication technologies, can create new markets or take over existing ones by redefining the rules. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how to use appropriate analytical tools in making decisions in respect to emerging business challenges and opportunities; to explore a series of contemporary business cases; to understand the main theories surrounding innovation, information systems, and new business models; to develop critical thinking in the area of business innovation through information systems and to learn how to research a topic in depth and develop a specialized understanding of a particular industry and/or business phenomenon.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 410 | Open
Instructor: Riccardo Maiolini
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; recommended BUS 305
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 498 | Open
Instructor: Colin Biggs
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of all core courses required for International Business
This heavily case-based capstone course will enable students to integrate and consolidate previous learning and examine in-depth real-life issues of policy, competitive advantage and barriers to trade; regional and global strategy; the challenges and benefits of operating and managing internationally and cross-culturally; and the major ways in which international business is currently changing, with a consideration of the implications for future business graduates.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/CMS 361 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Daniele Pica
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
The course aims at exploring strategies of social media management for business organizations. The focus of the course regards not only the aspects of communication with prospects and customers, but also the internal processes necessary in order to enact strategic decisions. Hence, this course analyzes every stage required to use social networks for business from a global perspective that includes, among others, IT, customer service and sales, in the light of the social, economic, and technological implications surrounding the ever-changing e-business environment
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/CMS 361 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Mackenzie Garrity
Tuesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Thursday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
The course aims at exploring strategies of social media management for business organizations. The focus of the course regards not only the aspects of communication with prospects and customers, but also the internal processes necessary in order to enact strategic decisions. Hence, this course analyzes every stage required to use social networks for business from a global perspective that includes, among others, IT, customer service and sales, in the light of the social, economic, and technological implications surrounding the ever-changing e-business environment
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/ITS 260 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
BUS/ITS 260 Made in Italy: The Italian Business Environment
The course analyzes the Italian Business environment, the characteristics of its culture and its inner workings. Students will be able to understand the different types of Italian corporate cultures and the role of family businesses in Italy. The course allows students to assess some of the most popular Italian brands and learn why "made in Italy" is a leading brand in the world, despite recent influences and threats from foreign investors. Company cases and special guests will be an important part of this course and will allow students to relate theory to practice.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: LAW/PL 328 | Open
Instructor: Pamela Harris
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; Recommended: PL 210
This course explores the major questions posed by religious freedom rights. Students will enter into the debate over what is religious freedom in general and what is the proper place of religion in democratic societies, and then focus on conflicts over the formal relationship between religious and state authorities, the allocation of public wealth to religious communities, the place of religious symbols in the public sphere, religious education in public and private schools, exemptions from general legal requirements for religious claims, tensions between religious communities’ identity and expressive rights and liberal views of sexual morality and gender equality.
Contact Hours: 45
45.0 Credits
Business | Course #: MGT 370 | Open
Instructor: Keith Gilbert
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
To develop an understanding of sport management (and numerous selected sub-sectors) in terms of marketing, demand and supply and their socio-economic context. The course will cover the structure and organization of sports markets and industries, the socio-economic, cultural & political context of sports markets and industries, the governance and integrity of sport and the commercial sports sectors and selected key issues.
Contact Hours: 3
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS 398 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Business obtained through the Career Services Center
Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid.

The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC).

After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Riccardo Maiolini
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Pietro Paganini
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Ieva Jakobsone Bellomi
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 pm
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Robert Christofferson
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 310 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Robert Chistofferson
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
The course examines human personality, behavior and relationships as applied to business, industrial and organizational settings. Topics include: social systems at work; human needs, attitudes, human relations; leadership patterns, group dynamics, teamwork, communication, motivation, participation and reward system; technology and people, managing change, models of organizational behavior and management. Teamwork and group participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 310 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Robert Chistofferson
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
The course examines human personality, behavior and relationships as applied to business, industrial and organizational settings. Topics include: social systems at work; human needs, attitudes, human relations; leadership patterns, group dynamics, teamwork, communication, motivation, participation and reward system; technology and people, managing change, models of organizational behavior and management. Teamwork and group participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 310 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Robert Chistofferson
Tuesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Thursday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
The course examines human personality, behavior and relationships as applied to business, industrial and organizational settings. Topics include: social systems at work; human needs, attitudes, human relations; leadership patterns, group dynamics, teamwork, communication, motivation, participation and reward system; technology and people, managing change, models of organizational behavior and management. Teamwork and group participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Daniele Pica
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocations of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design. facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Daniele Pica
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocations of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design. facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocations of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design. facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Management obtained through the Career Services Center
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 498 | Open
Instructor: Silvia Pulino
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of all other business core courses.
Focuses on the role and responsibilities of the Chief Executive Officer, which call for leadership, integration across functional areas, organizational development, strategy formulation and implementation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Tuesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Thursday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, MA 208
This course provides students with an understanding of the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of goods and services. Major areas: selecting target markets, market positioning, and marketing mix strategy. Skill development in demand/competitive analysis, value creation, teamwork, and effective communication. Teaching methodology is case study-based and group work is emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, MA 208
This course provides students with an understanding of the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of goods and services. Major areas: selecting target markets, market positioning, and marketing mix strategy. Skill development in demand/competitive analysis, value creation, teamwork, and effective communication. Teaching methodology is case study-based and group work is emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, MA 208
This course provides students with an understanding of the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of goods and services. Major areas: selecting target markets, market positioning, and marketing mix strategy. Skill development in demand/competitive analysis, value creation, teamwork, and effective communication. Teaching methodology is case study-based and group work is emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 304 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Pietro Paganini
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course investigates the process of new product management, starting from idea and concept generation through to project evaluation and development. The course is designed to be a workshop for new product development, allowing students to explore market opportunities and propose new concepts to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 304 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Pietro Paganini
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course investigates the process of new product management, starting from idea and concept generation through to project evaluation and development. The course is designed to be a workshop for new product development, allowing students to explore market opportunities and propose new concepts to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 305 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: MKT 301; Recommended: MA 209
Basic methods and techniques of marketing research. Designing a marketing research project: research question formulation, primary and secondary data collection, data analysis, and report presentation. Focus group interview, questionnaire construction, statistical analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 305 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301; Recommended: MA 209
Basic methods and techniques of marketing research. Designing a marketing research project: research question formulation, primary and secondary data collection, data analysis, and report presentation. Focus group interview, questionnaire construction, statistical analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Alessandro Signorini
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
Social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing the behavior of consumers. Models of buyer behavior, consumption patterns, market segmentation, attitude formation and change, brand loyalty, adoption of innovations and store choice decisions. Implications of consumer research for marketing management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Section: 2 | Open
Monday 7:30 pm - 8:45 pm
Wednesday 7:30 pm - 8:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
Social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing the behavior of consumers. Models of buyer behavior, consumption patterns, market segmentation, attitude formation and change, brand loyalty, adoption of innovations and store choice decisions. Implications of consumer research for marketing management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Section: 3 | Open
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
Social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing the behavior of consumers. Models of buyer behavior, consumption patterns, market segmentation, attitude formation and change, brand loyalty, adoption of innovations and store choice decisions. Implications of consumer research for marketing management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 320 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Colin Biggs
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses
the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 320 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Colin Biggs
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses
the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 321 | Open
Instructor: Mackenzie Garrity
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EN 110, MKT 301
Advertising as applied in industrialized countries. Its impact on the social and economic status of the consuming public.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 335 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
This course focuses on issues related to Retail Management in the Fashion industry and requires both an understanding of marketing principles as well as channel management concepts. The course reviews basic concepts related to retail business such as operations, logistics, retail channels management, retail controlling and strategic location development, which develop the student’s ability to understand performance indicators and measure store performance. Students are encouraged to focus on retail buying and stock planning, in order to fully understand how to manage in-store product life cycles. Teaching methodology is project based and team work is emphasized. Teams will be required to apply fashion retailing concepts to companies’ decision making through a proposed retail project, which will require a written strategic retail plan that is adapted to the Italian fashion market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 340 | Open
Instructor: Riccardo Maiolini
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, MKT 301
This course approaches Internet marketing from a marketing management perspective. The course looks at the Internet both as a tool to be used in the marketing planning process and as an element of a company's marketing mix. The course explores how traditional marketing concepts such as market segmentation, research, the 4Ps and relationship marketing are applied using the Internet and other electronic marketing techniques. Website design is not covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC; completion of a daily internship log; in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization; and a 2500 to 3500 page “White Paper” presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a “pass/no pass” basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar’s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 490 | Open
Instructor: Alessandro Signorini
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Marketing Majors: Senior standing and completion of all other marketing core courses. Business Majors: MA 208. Recommended: MKT 301, MKT 305, MKT 310
This course involves analytical integration of material covered in previous marketing courses. The course develops skills in diagnosing marketing problems, formulating and selecting strategic alternatives and recognizing problems inherent in strategy implementation. Requires the assessment of an existing product or service using both primary and secondary research tools and the development and presentation of a comprehensive marketing strategy.
Contact Hours: 45

Classical Studies

3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 260 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Benedetta Bessi
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities, and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 260 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Sharon Salvadori
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities, and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 278 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 480 | Open
Instructor: Thesis Reader
Thesis supervision for Classical Studies majors in their final year.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 221 | Open
Instructor: Benedetta Bessi
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
This course examines the history of Ancient Greece from the Archaic Age to the Age of Alexander, the seventh through fourth centuries B.C.E. Focus will be on the rise of Athens and Sparta as the most influential city states in Greece; the development of their respective political, military and social systems; and the causes of the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War that paved the way for the rise of Macedon and domination of the Greek world, first under Philip II, and then his son, Alexander the Great, until his death in 323 B.C.E. Readings in translation will include Herodotus, Aristophanes, Plato, Thucydides, Xenophon, and Plutarch.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Benedetta Bessi
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
This course tells the story of Italy and Rome from the Late Iron Age (8th Century BCE) to the end of the Roman Empire in the west (476 CE). The course will cover the culture of the Etruscans, Western Greeks, and the ancient peoples of Italy that dominated the peninsula for many centuries. Along the way we will study the semi-mythical Kings and later Emperors. We will look at the development of the expanding Roman Empire both across the Alps and the Mediterranean, and its great wars of defense and conquest. We will pay particular attention to the most exciting and best documented generations, those of the Civil Wars that started the decline of the Republic, and of the Julio-Claudian Empire that ended it. We will also examine the institution of the Empire by Cesar Augustus, its flourishing well into the second century CE, and its evolution and decline.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Massimo Betello
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
This course tells the story of Italy and Rome from the Late Iron Age (8th Century BCE) to the end of the Roman Empire in the west (476 CE). The course will cover the culture of the Etruscans, Western Greeks, and the ancient peoples of Italy that dominated the peninsula for many centuries. Along the way we will study the semi-mythical Kings and later Emperors. We will look at the development of the expanding Roman Empire both across the Alps and the Mediterranean, and its great wars of defense and conquest. We will pay particular attention to the most exciting and best documented generations, those of the Civil Wars that started the decline of the Republic, and of the Julio-Claudian Empire that ended it. We will also examine the institution of the Empire by Cesar Augustus, its flourishing well into the second century CE, and its evolution and decline.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/RH 372 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
An examination of the nature, purpose, and place of rhetoric in classical antiquity, as conceived and practiced by ancient Greeks and Romans. Readings (in translation) include the use and conceptualization of an art of persuasion by Gorgias, Plato, Isocrates, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Cicero, Quintilian, and Augustine. This course prepares students to evaluate the use (and abuse) of devices and techniques of classical rhetoric in contemporary politics, economics, marketing, media, and visual arts.
Contact Hours: 45

Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism

3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Benjamin Lee Scribner
Monday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wednesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Benjamin Lee Scribner
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Benjamin Lee Scribner
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Carolina De Luca
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication. In addition, Students should begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement, support it through a specific line of reasoning, and organize their support effectively and efficiently.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Carolina De Luca
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication. In addition, Students should begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement, support it through a specific line of reasoning, and organize their support effectively and efficiently.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Daniel Connelly
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication. In addition, Students should begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement, support it through a specific line of reasoning, and organize their support effectively and efficiently.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication. In addition, Students should begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement, support it through a specific line of reasoning, and organize their support effectively and efficiently.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 111 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Michael Watson
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 111 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Michael Watson
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Marco Ferrari
Monday 9:00 am - 10:15 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:15 am
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Kwame Phillips
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Erika Tasini
Monday 5:00 pm - 6:50 pm
Wednesday 5:00 pm - 6:50 pm
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 220 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Donatella Della Ratta
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 101
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 220 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Kwame Phillips
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 101
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 220 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Kwame Phillips
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 101
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 230 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Brian Thomson
Wednesday 3:30 pm - 6:15 pm
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 230 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Marco Ferrari
Tuesday 12:30 pm - 3:15 pm
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 311 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Alberto Micali
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occurring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic and social issues raised by digital media forms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 311 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Alberto Micali
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occurring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic and social issues raised by digital media forms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 311 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Donatella Della Ratta
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occurring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic and social issues raised by digital media forms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 380 | Open
This course will provide students with the opportunity to investigate how culture influences the communication process. Through lectures, screenings, written assignments, and class discussion, we will explore some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. We will examine examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 470 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of three 300 level COM or CMS courses.
This course is designed to be the capstone experience in analysis of media and media texts through specific theoretical constructs. Theories covered include semiotic theories of Saussure, Bakhtin, and Barthes; deconstruction theories and critical theories; and theories of spectatorship using psychoanalytic models. Further, the course provides students with experience in performing sustained and in-depth analysis of complex signifying operations and their relationship to ideological functions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 480 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Antonio Lopez
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of three COM or CMS courses at the 300 level
This senior capstone course culminates the coursework in communications by focusing on the study and application of ethical standards in a variety of communication environments. Classical and alternative ethical frameworks are explored in order to evaluate and respond to communication problems in the context of global media and cultural citizenship. Through the analysis of case studies, students explore how the structure of media organizations impact ethical decision making and learn to develop self-reflective media practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 480 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Antonio Lopez
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of three COM or CMS courses at the 300 level
This senior capstone course culminates the coursework in communications by focusing on the study and application of ethical standards in a variety of communication environments. Classical and alternative ethical frameworks are explored in order to evaluate and respond to communication problems in the context of global media and cultural citizenship. Through the analysis of case studies, students explore how the structure of media organizations impact ethical decision making and learn to develop self-reflective media practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: DJRN 399 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisite: EN 110; Recommended: DJRN 221
These courses are specialized and advanced courses in the field of Digital Journalism.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: DMA 333 | Open
Instructor: Brian Thomson
Tuesday 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Thursday 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 230
Many contemporary television sitcoms, news programs, variety shows, and events are shot with a multitude of cameras and are often cut and mixed live for instantaneous broadcast. This course prepares students for work as part of a multi-cam production team by giving them hands-on experience developing content for multi-cam production, prepping broadcast-ready assets, coordinating and executing live shoots, and live-streaming content on a variety of online platforms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 314 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
Myth is an extremely slippery word that has developed such a vast semantic range it is fruitless to try to recover an original or more authoritative meaning. Myths can be considered universal and timeless narratives describing human existence, or geographically determined stories reflecting essential features of a specific culture; vehicles of absolute truths or ideologically unsound delusions. Probably in the West today the word is principally used to describe a story, character or object which is entirely fictional and which should be revealed as such.

And yet mythology, the body of inherited myths in any culture, is at the core of narrative processes and any new text recasts one or more fundamental myths for the society that develops it, renewing its validity for the society itself. It seems to be impossible for human beings to organize their experiences into narratives without recurring to the same patterns.

The presence of narrative paradigms is often particularly visible in media products aimed at children, and refashioning myths for the new generations is also an ideological enterprise: shaping the minds of the young was always one of the principal ways of creating a cohesive society. Tracing the use children's media make of traditional myths provides a valuable observation point from which to survey the relationship between media and audience.

This course will be looking into how myths, considered as universal narratives, find their way into contemporary media products, by using the animated feature films produced by Disney.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 330 | Open
Instructor: Miriam Tola
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 399A | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 399B | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 399D | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: COM 221 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Elizabeth Macias Gutierrez
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
The course introduces students to the various kinds of writing they will encounter in the media professions and in digital multimedia production, and prepares them for more advanced media courses in the Communications and Media Studies program. Students will also be introduced to basic legal and ethical issues, such as libel, copyright, privacy. Activities include writing for online media, press releases, strategic campaigns, and short scripts for visual and audio media as well as exercises to pitch their ideas. They will also explore issues concerning style, communicability, and effective storytelling.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: COM 221 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Elizabeth Macias Gutierrez
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
The course introduces students to the various kinds of writing they will encounter in the media professions and in digital multimedia production, and prepares them for more advanced media courses in the Communications and Media Studies program. Students will also be introduced to basic legal and ethical issues, such as libel, copyright, privacy. Activities include writing for online media, press releases, strategic campaigns, and short scripts for visual and audio media as well as exercises to pitch their ideas. They will also explore issues concerning style, communicability, and effective storytelling.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: DMA 328 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Wednesday 12:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 230
This course introduces students to the strategic, conceptual, creative, and technical aspects of promotional videos (teasers, promos, trailers, campaigns, sales reels, and spots). It provides a basic understanding of the various short formats produced in TV and Web communication. The aim is to study common procedures and to get hands-on experience making promos, including how to hook a viewer, how to reach a target, how to engage an audience, and most of all, how to sell a story. This course offers an intensive overview of the entire production process in promo production, including activities like researching, creating a concept pitch/brief, editing, and post-production. The class will feature screenings, exercises, in-class assignments, editing sessions, voiceover recording sessions, and group projects. In order to participate, students will be expected to have a basic understanding of the skills and concepts involved with video editing, audio recording, and mixing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 316 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
From the cylinders to MP3s, from Tin Pan Alley to death metal, this is a general survey course exploring and analyzing the history and meaning of popular recorded music within mass culture and society. It focuses on the historical, aesthetic, social, political-economic and technological developments that have shaped the very definition of the popular in the musical field. The course covers various aspects of recorded music from the history of the recording industry to the concept of the recorded, from rock and other nationally specific styles to the rise of MTV and beyond.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course analyzes the ways in which diverse cultural practices have been used or understood as political weapons, as attempts to intervene in the historical world. The course will introduce students to a number of approaches both theoretical and practical, through readings of source texts and analysis of specific case studies which have investigated the possibility of cultural practice being used as a tool of conflict, dissent, affirmation of identity and resistance. One of the areas of inquiry will be an investigation of how, in advanced capitalist societies, social and political struggle necessarily happens through an engagement with dominant culture and media forms rather than in spite of them; the course will therefore concentrate on those cultural practices that, although not apparently political in content and aim, can nonetheless be used in politically productive ways. Emphasis will be placed on popular and mass culture artifacts and on the ways in which style is used by sub-cultures and other social identities in both national and global contexts.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 320H | Open
Instructor: Clelia Clini
Pre-requisite: A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required. Prerequisite: COM 220.
This course analyzes the ways in which diverse cultural practices have been used or understood as political weapons, as attempts to intervene in the historical world. The course will introduce students to a number of approaches both theoretical and practical, through readings of source texts and analysis of specific case studies which have investigated the possibility of cultural practice being used as a tool of conflict, dissent, affirmation of identity and resistance. One of the areas of inquiry will be an investigation of how, in advanced capitalist societies, social and political struggle necessarily happens through an engagement with dominant culture and media forms rather than in spite of them; the course will therefore concentrate on those cultural practices that, although not apparently political in content and aim, can nonetheless be used in politically productive ways. Emphasis will be placed on popular and mass culture artifacts and on the ways in which style is used by sub-cultures and other social identities in both national and global contexts.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 323 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
As we transition from an industrial model of media distribution to networked communications, corporations and grassroots environmental activists are vying to define environmental opinion in an evolving media landscape. By applying media literacy tools to examine paradigms of communication and ecology we will seek to understand how media impact environmental concepts, and explore media strategies for addressing issues such as global climate change. The course covers three core concepts: 1) comparing media and environmental ethics and paradigms, 2) environmental messaging, and 3) the interrelationship between the form of media systems and sustainable business practices.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 323H | Open
Instructor: Antonio Lopez
Pre-requisite: A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required. Prerequisite: COM 220.
As we transition from an industrial model of media distribution to networked communications, corporations and grassroots environmental activists are vying to define environmental opinion in an evolving media landscape. By applying media literacy tools to examine paradigms of communication and ecology we will seek to understand how media impact environmental concepts, and explore media strategies for addressing issues such as global climate change. The course covers three core concepts: 1) comparing media and environmental ethics and paradigms, 2) environmental messaging, and 3) the interrelationship between the form of media systems and sustainable business practices.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 330H | Open
Instructor: Clelia Clini
Pre-requisite: A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required. Prerequisite: COM 220.
This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 333 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 200
What is television’s fate in the global digital cultures of convergence? The course examines new programming and advertising strategies in the medium of television, the reconfiguration of traditional and the emergence of new roles within the industry, the development of new global production and distribution strategies and models as well as how these transformations shape actual program content.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 335 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course examines the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of digital games, their historical development and their articulation with other media and technologies in digitally mediated environments. Topics include the socio-technical aspects of digital gaming, embodiment and space, communities, fan cultures and sub-cultures, spectatorship and performance, gender, race, sexuality, and the politics and economics of production processes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 345 | Open
Instructor: Antonio Lopez
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course examines a growing subfield of cinema studies, ecocinema, which is devoted to exploring the intersection between film and environmental issues. Ecocinema encompasses a range of movie genres, including documentary, Hollywood blockbusters, eco-horror, indigenous films, and animation. This course investigates how themes like environmental catastrophe, wilderness, animal rights, climate change, the construction of human-nature relations, ecojustice, and environmental politics are communicated through the particular medium properties of film. This course also examines the material impact of film on the environment. During the semester students will study films by combining traditional methods of film criticism with ecocriticism to explore production, aesthetics, narrative, reception, and culture in relationship to environmental themes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 367 | Open
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/DMA 387 | Open
Instructor: Marco Ferrari
Monday 12:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
Though often overlooked, the act of projection is at the heart of cinema (the act or process of causing a picture to appear on a surface). This studio course focuses on the creation of moving image-based work, exploring how time and space are used as materials to create form and inspire content within the contemporary film genre known as expanded cinema. The technical, historical and psychological aspects of the projected image will be studied in order to re-think cinema as a group and investigate how the projected image can find meaning outside the black box of theaters or the white cube of galleries. Two personal experimental video projects will lead to a final group video installation that will use the environment within the vicinity of John Cabot University’s campus (Trastevere neighborhood) to inspire site-specific works while also becoming the location of the final outdoor projection event.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 241 | Open
Instructor: Federica Capoferri
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles. (This course carries 3 semester hours of credit.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 243 | Open
Instructor: Paolo Prato
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
CMS/ITS 243 Cinematic Rome (This course carries 3 semester credits)
An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; "Americans" in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini’s Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a "character" in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scène. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of "places and spaces" (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 322 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course will introduce students to contemporary Italian media and popular cultures. The course has a thematic approach and applies the analytical theories of critical cultural studies. Students will be exposed to development of various media forms as they have been shaped by and their impact on Italian culture and society. The press, film, radio, television, popular music, comics and graphic arts, sports and digital networks will be investigated from a variety of angles with particular attention on the media’s role in the construction of collective identities, the role of power and capital in shaping national identity, media use by social movements, the question of representation, popular protest and subcultural and subaltern expressions within the national space. Italy’s role within the global media economy will also be investigated.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 322 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course will introduce students to contemporary Italian media and popular cultures. The course has a thematic approach and applies the analytical theories of critical cultural studies. Students will be exposed to development of various media forms as they have been shaped by and their impact on Italian culture and society. The press, film, radio, television, popular music, comics and graphic arts, sports and digital networks will be investigated from a variety of angles with particular attention on the media’s role in the construction of collective identities, the role of power and capital in shaping national identity, media use by social movements, the question of representation, popular protest and subcultural and subaltern expressions within the national space. Italy’s role within the global media economy will also be investigated.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/PL 322 | Open
Instructor: Pamela Harris
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior or Senior Standing
An introduction to the major problems posed by the right to free speech: the origins and scope of this right, the problems in defining it, the values that it promotes as well as the values that it compromises. This course examines the political and cultural variables shaping the right to free speech by examining its role in many different jurisdictions. Focusing on concrete conflicts over political speech, freedom of religious conscience, hate speech, sexually-explicit speech, the protection of privacy, reputation and intellectual property, we look at constitutional case law and commentary in many different liberal democracies and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Through intense engagement with primary legal materials, class debate and a mock trial, this course will be especially useful for potential law students, journalists, philosophy and religious studies students, and anyone seeking a better understanding of his or her rights in a democratic society.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/TH 243 | Open
Tuesday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 11:00 am
An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; "Americans" in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini"s Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a "character" in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scène. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of "places and spaces" (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: COM 331 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 230
In this production workshop, students will investigate different approaches to documentary cinema as well as the various techniques available for telling a story in documentary form. Students will apply the acquired theoretical notions in three practical exercises: a location sketch, an interview and a personal essay film. At the end of the workshop, students will have three short films and a deeper understanding of the conceptual, aesthetic as well as ethical issues involved in documentary film making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 199 | Open
Instructor: Rocco Rorandelli
Tuesday 9:00 am - 11:45 am
This is a course in basic photojournalism on location. There will be both classroom sessions and classes off campus, held on location in Rome and the surrounding area, as well as visits to photographic exhibitions. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of photography and photojournalism; how cameras and lenses work; image composition; lighting conditions and techniques; shooting on location; techniques for working as a photographer; editing and producing photographs; and building a portfolio of images. Class sessions will cover learning use of a camera, lights, composition, color, documentary and candid photographic techniques, photographic software such as Adobe Photoshop, and critiques. Classes on location include practical fieldwork.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 221 | Open
Instructor: Judy Bachrach
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course introduces writing and reporting techniques for the mass media. It focuses on the essential elements of writing for the print, online and broadcast media. The course also covers media criticism, ethics in media, and the formats and styles of public relations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN 325 | Open
Instructor: Andrea di Robilant
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110; Recommended: JRN 221
This course offers the student practical experience researching, writing and marketing feature articles for print and/or online magazines. The topics covered include how to develop a good idea, analyze a target audience, gather information, write a feature article, and sell the story. Ultimately
this course will teach students how to successfully write longer feature stories and how to pitch them to the appropriate publication. The class time will include lectures where voice, style, use of language, and story structure techniques will be discussed. Class time will also include in-class writing and discussion
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DJRN/COM 199 | Open
This is a course in basic photojournalism on location. There will be both classroom sessions and
classes off campus, held on location in Rome and the surrounding area, as well as visits to
photographic exhibitions. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of photography
and photojournalism; how cameras and lenses work; image composition; lighting conditions and
techniques; shooting on location; techniques for working as a photographer; editing and producing
photographs; and building a portfolio of images. Class sessions will cover learning use of a
camera, lights, composition, color, documentary and candid photographic techniques, photographic
software such as Adobe Photoshop, and critiques. Classes on location include practical fieldwork
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 228 | Open

This course provides an overview of sound culture and nonlinear audio production with an emphasis on theoretical, historical and practical approaches. In this introductory-level course, students will gain familiarity with the historical trajectory of sound technology and sound art, and get an overview of the theoretical reflections that have accompanied sound artistic creation as well as the basic tools and techniques for nonlinear audio production. The projects devised for the class are aimed at improving listening skills, raise awareness of aural and sonic experience and integrate sound with narrative visual media, so as to allow students to communicate and conceptualize with sound. During the course of the session three fundamental aspects of sound will be addressed: 1)Sound as Sound/Listening/ Field Recordings/ Soundscapes; 2) Sonic Narratives; 3) Sound & Image Relations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 434 | Open
Instructor: Brian Thomson
Monday 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
TBA
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA/CMS 380 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, COM 230
The course focuses on the variety of new forms of critical engagement with audiovisual media --transformative remix videos, mash-ups, re-cuts, vids and the video essay™. All of these formats entail the appropriation and reutilization of pre-existing audiovisual footage — pulled from films, television programs, commercials, music videos, and so forth — in a way that deconstructs, questions, critiques, subverts or analyzes its aesthetic construction and cultural meaning. Students will expand their conceptual and technical skills by engaging these emerging forms of critical media practice, both by tracing their historical development and their relation to preceding trends in avant-garde cinema and contemporary art, and by creating their own political remix videos and analytical video essays. The course alternates weekly screenings and seminars, and includes four Final Cut Pro editing tutorials spread throughout the semester.
Contact Hours: 45

Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science

3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 101 | Open
Instructor: Khaison Duong
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
The course offers an overview of Computer Science. The history of the subject and the main areas of both accademic and industrial research are discussed. In particular, the course offers an overview and a gentle introduction to the basic concepts and methods in the following branches of computer science: Theory of Computation, Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence, Networks and the Internet, Database Theory and Bioinformatics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Khaison Duong
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Marco Scaramastra
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Khaison Duong
Monday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Section: 5 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Gazziano
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Section: 6 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Gazziano
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
An introductory course covering the most commonly used microcomputer applications, including the DOS operating system, Windows, word processing, and spread sheets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Marco Scaramastra
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Marco Scaramastra
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Gazziano
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Gazziano
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of web page creation, layout and design. By focusing on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), one of the most important of web languages used for static content layout and delivery, students will acquire essential skills used by web developers to produce industry standard pages. This will be accomplished using web editors such as Homesite or Dreamweaver MX. In addition, image preparation techniques with Photoshop for web-ready graphics will also be covered along with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) used for creating visually appealing pages. Concepts such as search engine techniques, web page/portal design principles will also be considered. Upon completion, students will have acquired those tools and techniques to design and develop a fully functioning web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 131 | Open
Instructor: Marco Scaramastra
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: CS 130
The course provides students with the technical knowledge required to deal with the professional process of designing, developing, installing and maintaining a business web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 230 | Open
Instructor: Khaison Duong
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
This introductory course provides an overview for visual representation of data. It is designed to cover the differences between infographics and visualization. Through both theory and applied practice the course covers specifics related to basic graphic design, online publishing, and corporate communication as it relates to large amounts of data and visually representing data in creative and meaningful ways.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 100 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Margaret Kneller
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities.

The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 100 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Margaret Kneller
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities.

The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 101 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Alice Fabbri
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.
This course is a review of intermediate algebra and has few prerequisites other than elementary familiarity with numbers and simple geometric concepts such as: finding the least common multiple of two or more numbers, manipulating fractions, calculating the area of a triangle, square, rectangle, circle, etc. Its objective is to prepare students for Pre-calculus.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 101 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Alice Fabbri
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.
This course is a review of intermediate algebra and has few prerequisites other than elementary familiarity with numbers and simple geometric concepts such as: finding the least common multiple of two or more numbers, manipulating fractions, calculating the area of a triangle, square, rectangle, circle, etc. Its objective is to prepare students for Pre-calculus.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 197 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Iannone
Tuesday 7:30 pm - 8:45 pm
Thursday 7:30 pm - 8:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to Calculus that focuses on the study of elementary functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, mainly oriented towards practical applications in business and economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on functions as the first step to analyzing real-world problems in mathematical terms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 197 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Iannone
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to Calculus that focuses on the study of elementary functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, mainly oriented towards practical applications in business and economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on functions as the first step to analyzing real-world problems in mathematical terms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Guarino
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Andrea Marinucci
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Section: 1 | Open
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities, and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; and an introduction to hypothesis testing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Arnone
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities, and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; and an introduction to hypothesis testing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Arnone
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities, and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; and an introduction to hypothesis testing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Arnone
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities, and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; and an introduction to hypothesis testing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 209 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Adrian Stoian
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of Statistics I. Topics include more advanced hypothesis testing, regression analysis, analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, time series analysis, and decision-making techniques. CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or higher.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 209 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Crina Pungulescu
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of Statistics I. Topics include more advanced hypothesis testing, regression analysis, analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, time series analysis, and decision-making techniques. CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or higher.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 299 | Open
Instructor: Daniele Castorina
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 198 with a grade of C- or above
The course is a further development of Calculus and at a more advanced level. After covering traditional topics such as techniques of integration, differential equations and the study of several variables, attention is given to business and economics applications (constrained optimization, Lagrange multipliers, Method of Least Squares, Numerical approximation, Taylor series, etc.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 491 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Arnone
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 198
This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 492 | Open
Instructor: Stefano Arnone
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Pre-requisite: (Prerequisites: MA 198, MA 208, MA 209; Recommended: MA 299)
This is a calculus-based introduction to mathematical statistics. While the material covered is similar to that which might be found in an undergraduate course of statistics, the technical level is much more advanced, the quantity of material much larger, and the pace of delivery correspondingly faster. The course covers basic probability, random variables (continuous and discrete), the central limit theorem and statistical inference, including parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. It also provides a basic introduction to stochastic processes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 495 | Open
Instructor: Daniele Castorina
Monday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Wednesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 299, MA 491 Multivariable calculus and Matrix Algebra
This course provides an introduction to ordinary differential equations. These equations contain a function of one independent variable and its derivatives. The term "ordinary" is used in contrast with the term partial differential equation which may be with respect to more than one independent variable. Ordinary differential equations and applications, with integrated use of computing, student projects; first-order equations; higher order linear equations; systems of linear equations, Laplace transforms; introduction to nonlinear equations and systems, phase plane, stability.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 202 | Open
Instructor: Margaret Kneller
Tuesday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
Thursday 8:30 am - 9:45 am
We look at some of the climate, chemical, biological and geological processes involved in climate change. The human impact upon the greenhouse effect is explained, the merits of the scientific theory are examined in light of available evidence to date. Climate changes apparent at the century time-scale, and longer, are introduced; the physical forcings responsible for these changes are presented. We also look at the international treaties (the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol) that address the greenhouse gases.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 220 | Open
Instructor: Margaret Kneller
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102
Students will learn about at Food and Agriculture, focusing on these subject areas.
Domestication of major animals and crops (timing and place, in order to set the scene for when humans made major steps in controlling and managing their food supply), the First Agricultural Revolution.
Common Food Commodities which are important today.
Grains (concentrating on wheat, corn, and rice, and then where grown, population served, cultivation requirements).
Bananas
The Green Revolution.
Examples of, and the Pros/Cons of Genetically Modified (Crop) Organisms—Amflora, Golden Rice, Insecticide Sweet Corn.
Sugar: crop sources and sugar substitutes.
Food for Export, e.g. Coffee, Cocoa.
Fertilizers, synthetic and organic.
Oils: palm oil, …olive oil.
Minor but Essential Crops, e.g. Leafy Green Vegetables.
Crop Pests, Diseases and Pesticides, imminent threats: e.g. wheat rust
Modern Industrial Agriculture to Organic Farming, examples.
Biofuels or Food: ethanol from sugar cane and corn, palm oil.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, and English Literature

3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 205 | Open
Instructor: George Minot
Tuesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or permission of instructor
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to develop the creative, editing, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction. Students will read contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, critiquing classmates work, and producing their own fiction.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 350 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or permission of instructor
This class is proposed for those who want to explore the pleasures and rigors of writing fiction. Throughout the course writing exercises, reading and discussing one another s writing in workshop format, as well as developing a portfolio of writing, will be required. The emphasis is on literary development as both a reader and a writer.

This course will enhance the students ability to do the following:

-To understand the importance of elements of the craft: image, voice, character setting and story
-To read examples of published fiction, as well as examples of student works
-To develop skill in writing and revising fiction
-To practice and develop discussion and analysis skills through written and oral assignments
-To learn self-motivation for developing your writing from an idea into a polished final draft
-To appreciate the development and revision processes of creative writing
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 352 | Open
Instructor: Elizabeth Geoghegan
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This creative writing workshop is designed to help students develop their writing and editorial skills, as well as the reading habits necessary for the production of works of creative nonfiction. The class will focus upon the creative process and the generation of several different forms within the nonfiction genre including
the personal essay, the memoir, travel writing, and the journalistic or magazine profile. Through the examination of superior examples of creative nonfiction, discussions, and critiques, students will become acquainted with the techniques and tools used to build an excellent portfolio of literary and journalistic pieces within the creative nonfiction genre.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 354 | Open
Instructor: Daniel Connelly
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
To develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of poems; to develop self-editing skills; to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing poems.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 356 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This interdisciplinary writing workshop employs the city of Rome as its muse and offers instruction in several genres of creative writing. By examining a variety of works inspired by the Eternal City, students will learn how to evaluate literature in light of an aesthetic and historic precedent, as well as participate in the long tradition of international writers who have recreated Rome on the page. The course will also problematize Rome, exploring the ancient city s contemporary contradictions and complexities and the way writers both perpetuate and dismantle certain myths, such as the illusory La Dolce Vita. Writing workshops will acquaint students with the techniques and tools used to critique and incorporate critical feedback into their own revision process. Through studied writing practice and the examination of the Roman setting as a vital literary component, students will generate a final portfolio of textual interpretations in response to the Eternal City.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DJRN 346 | Open
Instructor: Andrea di Robilant
Monday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DMA 348 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
This creative writing workshop helps students to develop the creative, editorial and reading skills needed for the production of a screenplay, based on the following principles: focus on visual story telling using minimal dialogue, introduction to story analysis using published screenplays and clips, and the exploration of narrative development. Material will be presented in the form of lectures, discussions, handouts, writing exercises, as well as screenings. In the context of a creative writing workshop, students will complete in-class and at home writing exercises. Students will also be required to provide their fellow writers with thorough feedback. Finally, students will pitch ideas in preparation for a full script, to be presented and critiqued at the end of the term.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: DMA 325 | Open
Instructor: Brian Thomson
Tuesday 3:30 pm - 6:15 pm
Animation is everywhere in contemporary media: from the miniature Westeros landscape of the Game of Thrones title sequence and the Southern Gothic styling of the True Detective opener to the lower third graphics of a local news show or the dancing text of a late-night 1-800-LAWYERS ad. The work of creating even the most humble animation used to be the preserve of teams of specialists with access to expensive and esoteric equipment. Increasingly, however, tight schedules and constrained budgets have placed the responsibility for producing them squarely on the editor’s shoulders. DMA 325 aims to help editors and filmmakers meet the heightened expectations of modern audiences with motion graphics that captivate and communicate in equal measure.
The course is a project-based exploration of the history, theory, tools, and techniques used to produce motion graphics and visual effects for film, television, and web video. The presentation of all topics includes historical background as well as a consideration of contemporary practices and likely avenues of future development. Each class involves both hands-on walkthroughs as well as ample opportunity for individual experimentation. For the midterm and final exams students will be required to produce a piece of work involving a broad spectrum of the techniques discussed using provided assets and a sample composite. The final project will be an individually developed portfolio piece making use of a 3D compositing workflow.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: DJRN 327 | Open
Instructor: Judy Bachrach
Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
An opinion piece is everything solid journalism requires from any other form of reporting: good investigative skills, sharp judgment, a firm, eloquent writing style, a clear presentation of hard, grounded facts, and excellent grammar. It is, however, different from classical journalism. The course will investigate the specificity of opinion writing within the context of journalism and look into the various forms that opinion pieces take: political stances, restaurant-theater-book- music or TV reviews, and critiques (pro and con) of medical, governmental or financial systems.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Aidan Fadden
Tuesday 10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Andrew Rutt
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Section: 3 | Open
Instructor: Anthony Casling
Monday 10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Section: 4 | Open
Instructor: Christin Campbell
Monday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Tuesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Wednesday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 103 | Section: 5 | Open
Instructor: Jonathan Jones
Monday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Andrea Rossi
Tuesday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Thursday 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the