John Cabot University
Spring Semester Elective 2023
12 - 17 credits

Immerse yourself in the ancient beauty of Rome! SAI students studying at JCU select 4 or 5 courses from the wide range of disciplines offered for a total of 12 - 17 credits. Courses available include Art History, Business, Political Science, and Communication, among many others. Semester students have the option of enrolling in the SAI Global Leadership Certificate, or completing a part-time internship, to further their academic and community involvement.


Application: now open
Closes: November 1, 2022
Apps accepted after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Transcript
Digital photo (passport style)
Passport copy (photo & signature page)
Italian privacy consent form
Supplemental JCU privacy consent form

Updates

  • Earn a Global Leadership Certificate or Certificate in Entrepreneurship
  • Attend a US-accredited University in the Eternal City of Rome
  • Explore courses in Race and Gender, Art History, Engineering, and more

Program Dates
January 11, 2023 – May 6, 2023


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 85+ (internet based) or IELTS: 6.5+.



Art History and Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
Business, Law, Management, and Marketing
Classical Studies
Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science
Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language
Design
Economics and Finance
Foreign Languages
History and Humanities
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology
Studio Art

Art History and Archaeology

3.0 Credits
Archeology | Course #: AH 271 | Open
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of museums and to curating practices. Classes will discuss the cultural position of the museum, the evolution of its function, the different forms of display, the historical developments of the act of collecting, the position of the visitor and the role of the curator. The primary purpose of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary for understanding how museums produce knowledge and structure the ways in which history, geography, cultural difference, and social hierarchies are mapped. Through a series of richly detailed case studies related to ancient and contemporary Rome museums, collections and institutions, classes will investigate the differences between the roles, the missions, the objectives, and the policies of conservation and exhibition-making in spaces, relating to modalities of thought. The course also intends to introduce the figure of the curator and its development from conservator and classifier to creative, critical protagonist of contemporary art culture. The course concludes with an overview of current debates around the contemporary need for museums, and large scale exhibition (such as Biennials and Triennials) and their perceived social functions
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 152 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 153 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 190 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best- preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.). In Rome, we focus primarily upon public buildings commissioned by Senators and Emperors: temples, law courts, theaters, triumphal monuments, baths. In Ostia, the port-city of Rome, we are able to experience many aspects of daily life: commerce, housing, religion, entertainment. Pompeii represents a well-to-do Republican and early Imperial period city that was influenced by the Greeks and Romans and preserves some of the most magnificent frescoes in the world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 196 | Open
Pre-requisite: Mandatory trip to Florence (cost TBD)
A survey course covering the innovations of the Early Renaissance to the High Renaissance (14th into the 16th Century). The works of Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Ghiberti, Masaccio, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante and Raphael and others will be studied.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 272 | Open
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the modern and contemporary world. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 273 | Open
This is an introduction to photography as both a historical and contemporary form of art and communication. While essential to the understanding of modern art, the history of photography also illuminates fundamental aspects of the image-dominated culture in which we live. The course is broadly chronological, and includes the invention and early reception of photography, its function as an independent art form, its uses in other arts, scientific investigation, reportage, photojournalism, portraiture, and other fields, and its relationships to major 19th and 20th century art movements. Contemporary photography is treated extensively.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 280 | Open
Focuses on the major artistic centers in Flanders, France, Germany and Holland in the 15th and 16th centuries. Special emphasis is given to the works of Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and Campin in the 15th century and to those of Derer, Bosch, Grenewald and Bruegel in the 16th. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the growing exchange of artistic ideas between Northern Europe and Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Open
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 297 | Open
An investigation of the major artistic trends occurring in Western Europe during the 17th century. In Italy (excluding Rome, which is covered in a separate course), southern centers such as Sicily, Naples and Lecce will be examined, along with such major northern centers as Turin and Venice, and specific artists such as Guarini, Juvarra and Tiepolo. Major "national" schools of painting will be analyzed: the Dutch and Flemish, as embodied by Rembrandt and Rubens; the Spanish, with Velazquez; the French, with Poussin and Claude. Attention is also paid to architectural and sculptural monuments in each country.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 298 | Open
Pre-requisite: On-site: activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - An on-site course that enables the student to visit many of the major and minor monuments of Baroque Rome - churches, palaces,piazze, etc. - and thus to study firsthand important works by such artists as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio and Pietro da Cortona, among others. On site activity fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 299 | Open
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of concern in the field of Art History. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 339 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History or permission of instructor
Venice is set apart from Italy and from Europe not only by its watery setting, but also by its history, traditions, and sense of cultural identity. Unique for its birth from the sea, distinguished by its Byzantine past, splendid for its civic ritual, glorious for its colorful palaces and churches, "La Serenissima" produced a distinct type of Renaissance painting. From the middle of the 15thC to the late 16thC, Venetian painters created a "school" of art that became celebrated for color and brushwork, for attention to light and landscape, and for new poetic and sensual themes. The political, religious and social structure in which these painters worked was essentially conservative, and the state, confraternities, and religious orders demanded that artists heed time-honored traditions. Other factors - such as independent-minded patrician connoisseurs, the influence of humanist thought and literature, the atmosphere of religious tolerance, and contact with Northern Europe - fostered innovation. The tensions between tradition and innovation, Venice and the world, the state and the individual, provided Renaissance art in Venice an especially lively and sometimes conflicted environment. While we will concentrate on Venetian painting, reference will also be made to relevant works of sculpture and architecture. The course will be an investigation of major themes, issues, controversies and problems concerning the understanding of Venetian art by means of analysis of selected key works, rather than an inclusive chronological survey of the period. The highpoint of the class is a three-day trip to Venice.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 339 H | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History or permission of instructor; mandatory 3-day trip to Venice
A panorama of the history of Venetian art, with special emphasis on painting and the innovations brought about by Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and continuing on to 18th-century artists of the Rococo.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 354 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History or Classical Studies or permission of the instructor.
Portraiture in Greece and Rome was a vital currency of social interaction and public engagement - across gender, class, location and context. As new archaeological data and research methodologies are transforming our understanding of its form and impact, the field is one of the most vibrant of ancient art. The course will discuss all aspects of what made a portrait: facial characteristics, hairstyles, body types, and clothing, as well as the inscribed base and placement. It will do so with a keen awareness of the developments and experimentations of the medium over time. The course will investigate themes like the uses of male and female portraits in public, the use of type-associations and role models, and the choices of statue types and status indicators. It will ask questions about who commissioned works, about workshop practices and distribution, and about the visual impact of techniques and form for the viewer, as well as why some portraits were destroyed or reworked.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 354 H | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History of Classical Studies, or permission of the instruction. Minimum GPA of 3.5 is required.
In ancient Rome portrait depictions functioned as a sign of individual identity and they were a striking component among the multitude of statues that adorned public and private buildings, and lined the streets and piazzas of the city. Portraiture hence furnishes key insights into the mind-set of ancient Rome. Representation could take many forms, physical resemblance and insight into personality being the most obvious. Particular traits could be emphasized to stress beauty or heroism, to indicate adherence to (or reaction against) the past, and hairstyles and clothing could be used to accentuate social status. As such, portraits were important markers of social and political persona. They could be displayed for self-promotion, to honor the powerful or to perpetuate memory thereby attaining an almost magical quality as substitutes for the individual and could be honored or punished accordingly. The course will examine Roman portraiture as objects of self-representation discussing the artistic choices of their depiction and the social and historical context of their creation. In-class lectures will be complemented by site and museum visits to take advantage of the many artworks still extant in Rome. On-site.
Contact Hours: 60
Rome City Series - In the third and fourth century Rome continued to be a stronghold of traditional paganism, but it was also a hub of "exotic" pagan cults imported from the East, home to one of the largest Jewish communities in the Diaspora, and of one of the fastest-growing Christian communities in the Empire. This diversity was matched by an increase in religious feeling that affected Roman society as a whole. Much of the art produced in Rome at this time may be understood in the context of this new religious ferment. It is a highly creative art, in which tradition, innovation, syntheses, and even contradiction often coexist and give expression to the complex and constantly evolving religious, cultural and social framework of the times. The goal of the course is to allow students to become familiar with the iconography and meaning of the art of Late Antique Rome in the context of this new age of spirituality. In-class lectures will be complemented by site and museum visits to take advantage of the many monuments and artworks still extant in Rome and its environs. On-site AH classes require a small fee for museum tickets.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 383 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in art history or permission of the instructor.
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the modern and contemporary world. Courses are normally research-
led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 460 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; intended for JCU Degree-Seeking AH students, but advanced visiting students studying AH are welcome.
This upper level seminar/practicum provides rigorous, practical preparation for the writing of professional art-historical research papers, including the Senior Thesis, through four discrete units: an individual portfolio review; a research tools and methods seminar; intensive, directed bibliographic research; and the formulation of a presentation to the class on the thesis topic, together with a new 'foundation' portfolio demonstrating mastery of the research skills, competencies, and bibliography necessary for advanced art-historical research writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH/CL 266 | Open
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the ancient world. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH/CL 366H | Open
Pre-requisite: A minimum GPA of 3.5 is required and one previous Cours in Art History or Classical Studies or permission of the instructor.
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the ancient world. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH/LAW 345 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History
The course examines the complex subject of art and cultural heritage crime, with a particular emphasis on Italy. While examining the international and national normative frameworks determining what constitutes an art/cultural heritage crime, special attention will be paid to the question of what constitutes “ownership” of art and cultural heritage. The course will consider the development over time of ideas of the value of art (both real and symbolic), as well as the ways that ideas of “ownership” have changed since the late 20th century. In addition to examining issues related to the definition, prevention, and punishment of art/cultural heritage crimes, the course will also examine the role of the Italian state in protecting its national cultural artifacts.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH/LAW 345 H | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History. This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required.
The course examines the complex subject of art and cultural heritage crime, with a particular emphasis on Italy. While examining the international and national normative frameworks determining what constitutes an art/cultural heritage crime, special attention will be paid to the question of what constitutes “ownership” of art and cultural heritage. The course will consider the development over time of ideas of the value of art (both real and symbolic), as well as the ways that ideas of “ownership” have changed since the late 20th century. In addition to examining issues related to the definition, prevention, and punishment of art/cultural heritage crimes, the course will also examine the role of the Italian state in protecting its national cultural artifacts.
Contact Hours: 60

Arts and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Theater and Film Studies | Course #: DR 101 | Open
During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively; employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.; develop an expressive speaking voice; engage with a variety of stage props; analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage; critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques; define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater; develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society; understand the responsibility of an actor s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors; initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Law, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 101 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 305 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore standing
This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems, and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. Students will have the opportunity to identify a business opportunity and develop the idea to the point of being start-up ready.This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non-business majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EN 110, MKT 301. Recommended: MGT 301
This course surveys the theory and practice of public relations, examining a model for public relations programming, the principles of public relations writing, and stakeholder/issues management techniques, together with their ethical implications. It distinguishes PR and publicity communication concepts within the framework of the firms overall marketing communication strategy and organizational mission. Special topics, such as Marketing Public Relations, Investor Relations, Government Relations, etc., will also be addressed. Students are expected to be able to use primary and secondary research and the information tools of communications professionals.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 202. Recommended: MKT 301
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 331 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
The course shall introduce the students with the political, economic, and innovation systems of the People’s Republic of China and its philosophical and cultural elements which are of importance for international business, international marketing, and international management disciplines. The course shall also cover main globalization and soft power initiatives of the People’s Republic of China currently reshaping international business environment.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course aims to provide students with a theoretical and practical background to develop their personal skills to manage negotiations in multicultural environment. The course will explore leadership and communication approaches to effective negotiation management, and will highlight the role of innovation in achieving integrative, successful results. Students will have an opportunity to explore the meaning and practice of managing negotiations. During the course, they will review theory, analyze strategies, engage in practical exercises and acquaint themselves with the language, thought, and praxis of negotiations in the multicultural setting in which we live, learn and work. By studying the impact of the relations between their and others’ cultural narratives, the student will discover innovative paths, techniques, and strategies to lead negotiation processes in multicultural environments.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 345 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course emphasizes the contextual and contingent nature of contemporary working-life and general social activities within the setting of business enterprises. Increasingly, highly skilled individuals, building and using information and communication technologies, can create new markets or take over existing ones by redefining the rules. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how to use appropriate analytical tools in making decisions in respect to emerging business challenges and opportunities; to explore a series of contemporary business cases; to understand the main theories surrounding innovation, information systems, and new business models; to develop critical thinking in the area of business innovation through information systems and to learn how to research a topic in depth and develop a specialized understanding of a particular industry and/or business phenomenon.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 410 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing; recommended BUS 305
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in startups. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 498 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of all core courses required for International Business
This heavily case-based capstone course will enable students to integrate and consolidate previous learning and examine in-depth real-life issues of policy, competitive advantage and barriers to trade; regional and global strategy; the challenges and benefits of operating and managing internationally and cross-culturally; and the major ways in which international business is currently changing, with a consideration of the implications for future business graduates.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS/ITS 260 | Open
The course analyzes the Italian Business environment, the characteristics of its culture and its inner workings. Students will be able to understand the different types of Italian corporate cultures and the role of family businesses in Italy. The course allows students to assess some of the most popular Italian brands and learn why "made in Italy" is a leading brand in the world, despite recent influences and threats from foreign investors. Company cases and special guests will be an important part of this course and will allow students to relate theory to practice.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: MGT 345 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
Nowadays, significant social problems dramatically affect both the most developed and developing countries in many fields like education, health care, the environment. Most people think that these serious issues should be solved by either the governments or the third sector, which includes voluntary and community organizations like charities and NGOs. Conversely, the mission of a corporate organization is not to solve social problems but to maximize both its profits and the shareholder value. Social entrepreneurship allows to solve social issues using the instruments and the techniques of classic corporate organizations, however, its main goal is its social mission rather than profit maximization.

The course explains how to become a social entrepreneur, the different options to organize a social business and to find the requested financial support, and how to use the lean start-up methodology to find both the right business model and market fit in order to solve a significant social problem.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: MGT/BUS 342 | Open
This course aims at studying in depth the model of Resonant Leadership and its positive effects on the increase of efficacy, creativity, motivation, conflict resolution, decision-making, and stress reduction within the workplace.
Using the latest studies in the fields of Psychology, Neuroscience, Behavior, and Organization participants will learn the theory, research and experience of employing Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence within the work environment.
The course will be divided in two parts:
a) a theoretical part in which the participants will be introduced to the model of Resonant Leadership informed by Mindfulness, Emotional Intelligence, Neuroscience, and the most recent cognitive research; b) a practical-experiential part in which Mindfulness techniques and the development of Emotional and Social Intelligence will be learned in order to promote resonance in leadership.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: MGT/CS 337 | Open
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 219 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course provides the student with an overview of the law in general, beginning with the foundations of the legal and regulatory environment, the law making processes, and the implementation of the legal rules. Students examine some areas of substantive law, including bodies of law that are regulatory in nature. Particular attention is given to aspects of business transactions in an international context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 323 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course deals with legal aspects of international business transactions. The course introduces students to issues in international commerce, including requirements of a contract, international shipping terms, and liability of air and ocean carriers. The course will examine international and U.S. trade law, including GATT 1994, and the regulation of imports and exports. Finally, the course will familiarize students with various areas of regulation of international business, such as competition law, employment discrimination law, and environmental law.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: PL/LAW 320 | Open
This course examines the basic concepts of public international law, to enable students to critically evaluate the interplay between legal claims and power relations. Starting with a theoretical overview of the character, development and sources of international law, the course examines such law-generating and law-implementing institutions as the United Nations, international arbitration and adjudication, international criminal tribunals, national systems and regional organizations. Such substantive areas as the law of war (the use of force and humanitarian law), international criminal law, human rights, and environmental law will be given special attention.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: PL/LAW 361 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: PS/LAW 338 | Open
Pre-requisite: PS 101 or permission of the instructor
The course focuses on applications of concepts and theories from cognitive, social, developmental and clinical psychology, to the administration of justice. Topics include the psychological processes involved in jury selection, jury deliberation and decision making, police interrogation, false confessions, eyewitness testimony, memory for traumatic events, child witnesses, juvenile offenders, and the role of psychologists as trial consultant and expert witnesses.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS 398 | Open
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Business obtained through the Career Services Center
Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid.

The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC).

After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS/EC 336 | Open
This course considers some of the most important issues concerning contemporary challenges in the field of entrepreneurship. Students will be confronted with interdisciplinary perspectives to the study of entrepreneurship that stem from economics, psychology, geography, history, cultural studies, and policy making, to better understand the emergence and the determinants of entrepreneurial ecosystems.

In the first part of the course, we will study the role of an individual in entrepreneurial ecosystems, e.g. psychological and biological characteristics of entrepreneurs; determinants of successful entrepreneurship including early entrepreneurial career development in the childhood, role models in the family, human and social capital, and the importance of geographical location of a start-up, among others. We will further consider particularities of female entrepreneurship, ethnic entreprenurship, social entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. Last but not least, we will study the relationship between entrepreneurhsip and individual well-being, for instance, in terms of life and job satisfaction, as well as entrepreneurial incomes and health issues.

In the second part of the course, we will focus on regional entrepreneurial ecosystems and the role of entrepreneurship for economic welfare. We will consider historical examples of productive, unproductive and even destructive entrepreneurship, study the role of regional culture and legacies of anti-entrepreneurial political regimes for the current level of entrepreneurial activities. Moreover, we will discuss the role of entrepreneurship for regional economic development, e.g. job creation and innovation activities. Last but not least, we will investigate the currently occurring move of developed economies toward more entrepreneurial societies and we will discuss various pro-entrepreneurial public policies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocation of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design, facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 335 | Open
The course is designed to expand student's knowledge in the area of supply chain management by applying analytical methodologies and information technology. Supply chains are concerned with the efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses and stores so that products are supplied to customers in the right quantity and at the right time, while satisfying customer service level requirements at minimum cost. Deficiencies in the SC result in a downgrade of competitiveness. Only over the last few years firms have started to focus on supply chain management (SCM) as a source of competitive advantage. SCM is an area of knowledge which offers tremendous opportunity for most firms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 426 | Open
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
This is an introductory course in Comparative Business Cultures in a context of International Business and Management, covering the work of Clyde Kluckholm and Fred Strodtbeck, Gary Ferraro, Bjorn Bjerke, Fons Trompenaars, Geert Hofstede as well as the G.L.O.B.E. project. The emphasis in this course is on understanding and applying one's knowledge of different national cultures as an aid to improved management of human resources, enhanced cross border trade, relocation of business activities to different countries, as well as on the melding of different cultures in multinationals as well as companies which are involved in joint ventures, mergers, or take-overs.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 470 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 498 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of all other business core courses.
This capstone course focuses on the roles and skills of the General Manager and on diagnosing and finding realistic solutions to complex strategic and organizational problems. Business situations will be analyzed from the point of view of the General Manager to identify the particular tasks related to his/her unique role, which calls for leadership, integration across the functional areas, organizational development, strategy formulation and implementation. Prerequisites: Completion of all Core Business Courses. In particular, case discussion will require a good understanding of Finance (performance evaluation, forecasting, budgeting), Marketing principles, Organizational structure and Management.

The course builds on previous course work by providing an opportunity to integrate various functional areas and by providing a total business perspective.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT/CMS 361 | Open
This course explores the significance of social networks in business and social life. The focus of the course is to critically appreciate social media platforms across a variety of contexts. The course investigates issues related to the management of social media in terms of the strategies and tactics related to successful deployment and cultivation of business/social initiatives and the redefinition of the customer/user as a central element in value creation. Issues related to participatory culture, communication power, collaborative work and production, privacy and surveillance, and political economy of social media are explored in depth through the use of contemporary cases.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, MA 208
This course will give students a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the strategic marketing planning process including: methods and tools of market assessment, customer segmentation analysis, development of the value proposition, positioning and planning of marketing tactics designed to deliver value to targeted stakeholders.

Emphasis is placed on the need to align marketing principles and theories with the management skills needed for the preparation of a marketing plan. Students will be able to analyze opportunities and threats in both the macro and micro-environments. Students will also conduct a marketing research gathering data for effective decision-making and will develop their ability to evaluate gaps.

In this course, students will begin to learn how to conduct a competitive analysis, analyze environmental trend, forecast changing market demand and develop competitive marketing strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 302 | Open
This course offers key insights into the rapidly growing service sector industry. The course is challenging and requires students to apply their knowledge and skills for the effective management of service design and delivery. Central issues addressed in the course include identifying differences between service and product marketing; understanding how customers assess service quality/ satisfaction; applying the GAPS model to assess service failure; and understanding of the theory of relationship marketing and using related tools and techniques for keeping customers and encouraging loyalty.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 304 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course investigates the process of new product management, starting from idea and concept generation through to project evaluation and development. The course is designed to be a workshop for new product development, allowing students to explore market opportunities and propose new concepts to the market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 305 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301; Recommended: MA 209
This course covers the basic methods and techniques of marketing research. Discusses the tools and techniques for gathering, analyzing, and using information to aid marketing decision- making. Covers topics such as problem definition, research design formulation, measurement, research instrument development, sampling techniques, data collection, data interpretation and analysis, and presentation of research findings. Students choose a marketing research project, formulate research hypotheses, collect primary and secondary data, develop a database, analyze data, write a report, and present results and recommendations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course focuses on the study of consumer decision processes, consumer behavior models and their impact on the development of marketing strategies. The emphasis is on researching and in-depth understanding of the consumer decision process. Teaching methodology includes case studies and an emphasis on experiential research.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 320 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 321 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EN 110, MKT 301
Advertising as applied in industrialized countries. Its impact on the social and economic status of the consuming public.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 335 | Open
This course focuses on issues related to Retail Management in the Fashion industry and requires both an understanding of marketing principles as well as channel management concepts. The course reviews basic concepts related to retail business such as operations, logistics, retail channels management, retail controlling and strategic location development, which develop the student’s ability to understand performance indicators and measure store performance. Students are encouraged to focus on retail buying and stock planning, in order to fully understand how to manage in-store product life cycles. Teaching methodology is project based and team work is emphasized. Teams will be required to apply fashion retailing concepts to companies’ decision making through a proposed retail project, which will require a written strategic retail plan that is adapted to the Italian fashion market.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 340 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, MKT 301
This course approaches Internet marketing from a marketing management perspective. The course looks at the Internet both as a tool to be used in the marketing planning process and as an element of a company's marketing mix. The course explores how traditional marketing concepts such as market segmentation, research, the 4Ps and relationship marketing are applied using the Internet and other electronic marketing techniques. Website design is not covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 355 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301, Junior Standing
This course introduces students to the conceptual frameworks, ethics, and practice associated with social marketing. This course explores how classic marketing techniques can be effectively applied beyond traditional corporate settings, in not-for-profit organizations. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles of social marketing, and then will address fundraising and resource development as well as social communication campaigns. Fundraising is the application of marketing principles to generate funds that enables not-for-profit organizations to achieve their objectives and cover their expenses. Social communication campaigns deal with creating awareness of the not-for-profit organization’s mission and services and influencing specific target audiences to behave differently for a social purpose. At the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of the financial analysis needed for program management and performance review. The course offers students a valuable opportunity to implement the marketing concepts in an original and growing sector, where the objectives are broader than simple profit maximization, and social, ethical and political factors play a major role.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
During the course students will undertake studies on brand assessment, goal setting; defining brand equity and target; Crafting a Communication Strategy; Establishing the Marketing, Communications, Public Relations and Media Strategies; Building the Marketing Plan; and Measurement and Strategic Brand Audit. Students will complete a group project where they choose a brand or create their own and take on the role as brand manage to build, manager and market a brand using successful public relations, communications, and media strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 360 H | Open
Pre-requisite: MKT 301. This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required
During the course students will undertake studies on brand assessment, goal setting; defining brand equity and target; Crafting a Communication Strategy; Establishing the Marketing, Communications, Public Relations and Media Strategies; Building the Marketing Plan; and Measurement and Strategic Brand Audit. Students will complete a group project where they choose a brand or create their own and take on the role as brand manage to build, manager and market a brand using successful public relations, communications, and media strategies.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 490 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior standing
This course involves the analytical integration of material covered in previous marketing courses. It develops skills in diagnosing marketing problems, formulating and selecting strategic alternatives, and recognizing problems inherent in strategy implementation. The development of a comprehensive marketing plan is a major requirement of the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Classical Studies

3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 260 | Open
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities, and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 278 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 221 | Open
This course examines the history of Ancient Greece from the Archaic Age to the Age of Alexander, the seventh through fourth centuries B.C.E. Focus will be on the rise of Athens and Sparta as the most influential city states in Greece; the development of their respective political, military and social systems; and the causes of the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War that paved the way for the rise of Macedon and domination of the Greek world, first under Philip II, and then his son, Alexander the Great, until his death in 323 B.C.E. Readings in translation will include Herodotus, Aristophanes, Plato, Thucydides, Xenophon, and Plutarch.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Open
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
Contact Hours: 45

Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism

3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Open
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS/BUS 385 | Open
The course provides an in-depth analysis of the technical, social, cultural and political contexts and the implications of increasingly ubiquitous surveillance practices. The focus of the course will be in analyzing the deployment and implementation of specific surveillance practices within mediated digital environments and the other spaces of everyday life. Concepts such as privacy and secrecy will be analyzed as they relate to the general field of surveillance. The course will focus on the ways in which these practices circulate within the spaces of culture, cut through specific social formations and are disseminated in the global mediascape. Particular attention will be placed on the ways in which the concept and procedures of surveillance are imagined, represented and contained in popular culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Open
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 111 | Open
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Open
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 101
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society—none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 221 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110
The course introduces students to the various kinds of writing they will encounter in the media professions and in digital multimedia production, and prepares them for more advanced media courses in the Communications and Media Studies program. Students will also be introduced to basic legal and ethical issues, such as libel, copyright, privacy. Activities include writing for online media, press releases, strategic campaigns, and short scripts for visual and audio media as well as exercises to pitch their ideas. They will also explore issues concerning style, communicability, and effective storytelling.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 230 | Open
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 311 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occuring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print, and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic, and social issues raised by digital media forms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 470 | Open
Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and completion of three 300 level COM or CMS courses.
This course is designed to be the capstone experience in analysis of media and media texts through specific theoretical constructs. Theories covered include semiotic theories of Saussure, Bakhtin, and Barthes; deconstruction theories and critical theories; and theories of spectatorship using psychoanalytic models. Further, the course provides students with experience in performing sustained and in-depth analysis of complex signifying operations and their relationship to ideological functions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 570 | Open
This course is designed as an advanced level exploration of major theories and schools of thought in media studies and communications. It surveys foundational theories about media and communication, ranging from mass media in the 19th century to contemporary digital media and cultures. Schools of thought and concepts covered in the course include the study of ideology, hegemony, political economy, culture industries, medium theory, cultural studies, mass media and society, spectacle and spectatorship, race, gender, post-colonialism, semiotics, and postmodernism. Students will apply theories through practical written research projects and analysis of current media practices.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: DMA/CW 348 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS/PL 348 | Open
Pre-requisite: *This class will be taught remotely*
This course examines violence and terror as inherent structural components of contemporary politics and media. Students will study how the performance of violence in the contemporary media landscape has shaped new visual cultures, such as emergent modes of producing evidence, bearing witness and archiving personal and collective memories of traumatic events. Conversely, the course examines how visual culture has dramatically impacted on the way in which we understand and consume violence and terror. Subsequently, students will examine the relationship between violence and visibility, the performance of terror and its representational regimes, through a variety of global visual media from around the world. Example include Hollywood movies; art documentaries; amateur films; photographs; art projects and performances; user-generated videos (including audiovisual material produced by armed groups and terrorist organizations); and state produced media.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: DJRN 330 | Open
This course focuses more in-depth on the fundamentals of news reporting and writing, with an emphasis on the print, online, and broadcast media. Key skills to master include criteria for judging news, information gathering, and crafting different styles of news stories for print, broadcast and online media. The course also covers proper line-editing techniques, plus Web layout and publishing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: DJRN 380 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 316 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220
From the cylinders to MP3s, from Tin Pan Alley to death metal, this is a general survey course exploring and analyzing the history and meaning of popular recorded music within mass culture and society. It focuses on the historical, aesthetic, social, political-economic and technological developments that have shaped the very definition of the popular in the musical field. The course covers various aspects of recorded music from the history of the recording industry to the concept of the recorded, from rock and other nationally specific styles to the rise of MTV and beyond.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 333 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 200
What is television’s fate in the global digital cultures of convergence? The course examines new programming and advertising strategies in the medium of television, the reconfiguration of traditional and the emergence of new roles within the industry, the development of new global production and distribution strategies and models as well as how these transformations shape actual program content.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 336 H | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 220 recommended. This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required
Since its emergence in the late 1970s, the music video has become the dominant means of advertising popular music and musicians, as well as one of the most influential hybrid media genres in history. In sampling and reworking a century’s worth of films and other pop culture artefacts (as well as art objects and concepts), music videos have affected aesthetic style in a wide range of film and television genres, introducing experimental and avant-garde techniques to a mass audience while influencing artistic and aesthetic movements in their own right. This course will investigate the ways in which popular (recorded) music and visual cultures have reciprocally influenced one another. Music videos will be examined alongside various other media forms including videogames, live concert films, film and television music placement and curation, television title sequences and end credits, user generated content on YouTube, remixes, and mashups. The course will take a particular look at experimental, avant-garde film and video traditions and how they inform music video. Ultimately, the course will specifically treat music videos as a distinct multimedia artistic genre, different from film, television and the popular recorded music they illuminate and help sell.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 241 | Open
This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 322 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course will introduce students to contemporary Italian media and popular cultures. The course has a thematic approach and applies the analytical theories of critical cultural studies. Students will be exposed to development of various media forms as they have been shaped by and their impact on Italian culture and society. The press, film, radio, television, popular music, comics and graphic arts, sports and digital networks will be investigated from a variety of angles with particular attention on the media’s role in the construction of collective identities, the role of power and capital in shaping national identity, media use by social movements, the question of representation, popular protest and subcultural and subaltern expressions within the national space. Italy’s role within the global media economy will also be investigated.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 228 | Open
This course provides an overview of sound culture and nonlinear audio production with an emphasis on theoretical, historical and practical approaches. In this introductory-level course, students will gain familiarity with the historical trajectory of sound technology and sound art, and get an overview of the theoretical reflections that have accompanied sound artistic creation as well as the basic tools and techniques for nonlinear audio production. The projects devised for the class are aimed at improving listening skills, raise awareness of aural and sonic experience and integrate sound with narrative visual media, so as to allow students to communicate and conceptualize with sound. During the course of the session three fundamental aspects of sound will be addressed: 1)Sound as Sound/Listening/ Field Recordings/ Soundscapes; 2) Sonic Narratives; 3) Sound & Image Relations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 325 | Open
Animation is everywhere in contemporary media: from the miniature Westeros landscape of the Game of Thrones title sequence and the Southern Gothic styling of the True Detective opener to the lower third graphics of a local news show or the dancing text of a late-night 1-800-LAWYERS ad. The work of creating even the most humble animation used to be the preserve of teams of specialists with access to expensive and esoteric equipment. Increasingly, however, tight schedules and constrained budgets have placed the responsibility for producing them squarely on the editor’s shoulders. DMA 325 aims to help editors and filmmakers meet the heightened expectations of modern audiences with motion graphics that captivate and communicate in equal measure.
The course is a project-based exploration of the history, theory, tools, and techniques used to produce motion graphics and visual effects for film, television, and web video. The presentation of all topics includes historical background as well as a consideration of contemporary practices and likely avenues of future development. Each class involves both hands-on walkthroughs as well as ample opportunity for individual experimentation. For the midterm and final exams students will be required to produce a piece of work involving a broad spectrum of the techniques discussed using provided assets and a sample composite. The final project will be an individually developed portfolio piece making use of a 3D compositing workflow.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 328 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 230
This course introduces students to the strategic, conceptual, creative, and technical aspects of promotional videos (teasers, promos, trailers, campaigns, sales reels, and spots). It provides a basic understanding of the various short formats produced in TV and Web communication. The aim is to study common procedures and to get hands-on experience making promos, including how to hook a viewer, how to reach a target, how to engage an audience, and most of all, how to sell a story. This course offers an intensive overview of the entire production process in promo production, including activities like researching, creating a concept pitch/brief, editing, and post-production. The class will feature screenings, exercises, in-class assignments, editing sessions, voiceover recording sessions, and group projects. In order to participate, students will be expected to have a basic understanding of the skills and concepts involved with video editing, audio recording, and mixing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 333 | Open
Pre-requisite: COM 230
Many contemporary television sitcoms, news programs, variety shows, and events are shot with a multitude of cameras and are often cut and mixed live for instantaneous broadcast. This course prepares students for work as part of a multi-cam production team by giving them hands-on experience developing content for multi-cam production, prepping broadcast-ready assets, coordinating and executing live shoots, and live-streaming content on a variety of online platforms.
Contact Hours: 45

Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science

3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Open
This course helps students develop the advanced skills that are necessary in personal productivity office applications, such as word processing, data management and analysis, and presentation/slide design. The course follows best practices and reviews available internet tools for data storage.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 130 | Open
The premise of this course is that a web site differs from a traditional media publication because its contents can be updated at any moment, many possibilities exist for making it interactive, and reader attention span is short. The course provides students with technical knowledge and skills required to build a web site, while covering design, communication, and computer-human interaction issues. Topics include web history, HTML, style sheets, and effective information searching. As a final project, students create a web site on a liberal arts topic, which will be judged by the instructor and a reader specialized in the chosen topic.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 131 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS 130
The course provides students with the technical knowledge required to deal with the professional process of designing, developing, installing and maintaining a business web site.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 160 | Open
This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. The goal of this course is to advance students’ computational thinking, educate them to use programs as tools in their own field of study, and to provide them with fundamental knowledge of programming strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 320 | Open
This course will focus on advanced programming techniques and introduce concepts of algorithm design and analysis, using Python, a modern programming language that is popular in the industry. Topics of the course include the implementation and evaluation of advanced algorithms, the design and deployment of Web applications, and the fundamentals of programming for data management and analysis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: DMA 324 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 100 | Open
This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities.

The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 101 | Open
This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.
This course is a review of intermediate algebra and has few prerequisites other than elementary familiarity with numbers and simple geometric concepts such as: finding the least common multiple of two or more numbers, manipulating fractions, calculating the area of a triangle, square, rectangle, circle, etc. Its objective is to prepare students for Pre-calculus.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 197 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to Calculus that focuses on the study of elementary functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, mainly oriented towards practical applications in business and economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on functions as the first step to analyzing real-world problems in mathematical terms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; hypothesis testing, and an introduction to simple linear regression.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 209 | Open
Pre-requisite: CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of Statistics I. Topics include more advanced hypothesis testing, regression analysis, analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, time series analysis and decision- making techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 299 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 198 with a grade of C- or above
The course is a further development of Calculus and at a more advanced level. After covering traditional topics such as techniques of integration, differential equations and the study of several variables, attention is given to business and economics applications (constrained optimization, Lagrange multipliers, Method of Least Squares, Numerical approximation, Taylor series, etc.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 491 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 198
This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 492 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 198, MA 208, MA 209; Recommended: MA 299
This is a calculus-based introduction to mathematical statistics. While the material covered is similar to that which might be found in an undergraduate course of statistics, the technical level is much more advanced, the quantity of material much larger, and the pace of delivery correspondingly faster. The course covers basic probability, random variables (continuous and discrete), the central limit theorem and statistical inference, including parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. It also provides a basic introduction to stochastic processes.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 497 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 202 | Open
The class will examine the chemical, biological, physical, and geological processes involved in that climate change, already evident in the 20th century, and predicted for the 21st century. The human impact upon the “greenhouse effect” is explained, the merits of the scientific theory are examined in light of available evidence to date. Climate changes apparent at the century time-scale, and longer, are introduced; the physical forcings responsible for these changes are presented. The international treaties (the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol) that address anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are introduced, along with local to regional initiatives developed by the private and public sectors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 220 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102
This is a survey course of agriculture, emphasizing the important food plants of the 21st century. The aim is to learn key processes which lead to the wide array of foods, which are available in developed countries. We start from the events of domestication, pass through the Green Revolution, and end with major plant crop commodities (such as bananas and coffee) being cultivated by “agribusiness” or also by “sustainable” farming methods. We also look at major issues related to agriculture today: for example, the development of biofuels which may use food stocks, and diseases and pests which threaten important monocultures. We look at the major achievements in agriculture of the 20th century, and try to anticipate the important uses and vulnerabilities of plant crops in the 21st century.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: NS 290 | Open
This course provides the liberal arts student with an introduction to the scientific issues which underpin human health in the urban environment. We study components of the urban environment by using basic concepts from ecology, biology, chemistry, and geology. We then learn about "linkages" (or interactions) between humans and their physical, chemical, and biological environment in order to understand human health in the urban environment. The interactions examined will relate to actual conditions found in major cities in the 21st century: we look at water supply and quality, air quality standards, energy supplies, and common diseases.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language

3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 205 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 or permission of instructor
This course provides an introduction to the creative practice of writing fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and stage/screen writing, while probing major issues of literary aesthetics. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution requirement in English Literature.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 350 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 103 or 105 with a grade of C or above
The course aims to develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction; to develop self-editing skills; and to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing literary fiction. Students will read both contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, reading classmates' fiction, and producing and workshopping their own fiction. Students will compile a portfolio of the work they produce during the term. Students completing this workshop course will be familiar with the skills needed to produce literary fiction, to self-edit work in progress, and to discern the characteristics that make quality literary fiction.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 110 | Open
Pre-requisite: Completion of EN 103 with a grade of C or above OR completion of EN 105 with a grade of C or above
This course reinforces the skills needed to write well-organized essays, focusing specifically on argumentative essays. Elements covered include thesis development, critical reading, organizing and outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and citation and documentation standards. Techniques of academic research and the use of the library and other research facilities are discussed. In addition to regular in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments, students are required to write a fully documented research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to fulfill the University English Composition requirement and to be eligible to take courses in English literature. Individual students in EN 110 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 200 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
Presupposing no previous knowledge of literature, this course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in four genres, poetry, short story, drama and novel. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned text, use various critical approaches and write critical essays on the specified readings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 205 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or higher
The course traces various developments in the genre of the novel from the 17th to the 20th centuries through a reading of selected representative texts. In addition, students are required to consider these works alongside of the development of theories about the novel. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 210 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
Major theories concerning the nature and source of poetic talent and a consideration of the traditional aspects of prosody and poetic form. The course emphasis falls upon competence with poetry as an art form rather than upon the knowledge of particular poets or literary periods.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 215 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above and one previous literature course
Designed as an introduction to the theoretical approaches to literature, the course will stimulate students to think and write critically through the study of the principal topics of literary theory. The course will adopt both a historical approach, covering each theory in the chronological order of its appearance on the scene, and a critical approach - putting the theories to the test by applying them to a literary text. The course will also help students to move on to an advanced study of literature by introducing them to the research methods and tools for the identification, retrieval, and documentation of secondary sources.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 223 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
The course deals with the development of American Literature from the mid-17th century to modern times, with an emphasis on the creation of a distinctive American "voice." Attention will be given to writers in the Puritan period and the early Republic, as well as to those who contributed to the pre-Civil War "American Renaissance," the rise of Realism and Naturalism, and the "Lost Generation." EN 110 or EN 112 with a grade of C- or higher.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 230 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
The course deals with works by major writers in the English language over a period of nearly one thousand years. Beginning with Anglo-Saxon poetry, this survey continues through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and concludes with Milton. In the context of the course, students should develop both their general background knowledge of literary history as well as their ability to appreciate and criticize particular texts. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 231 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of the survey begun in EN 230, this course deals with works by major British writers in the period 1660 to 1832. Approximately equal attention is devoted to writers of the Restoration (excluding Milton) and 18th century, and to writers of the Romantic Movement.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 232 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C- or above
Considering major British and Irish writers since 1832, this course deals with, among other concerns, the various ways in which the Victorians and selected writers of the first half of the 20th century responded to the inheritance of Romanticism. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 245 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or higher
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 282 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
The course considers the importance of Italy for non-Italian writers, particularly European, British and American writers from the eighteenth century onward. Topics considered include: a critique of the perception and construction of Italy and Italians, the development of genres like the gothic or novels of national identity, the gendering of nationality, imperialism, the use of art and history in literature. Consideration is given to the ways in which these works are in dialogue with each other in terms of cultural assumptions and influence. This course is an alternate course to EN 278. If taken in addition to EN 278, it may count as a major elective. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 285 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
To supplement the traditional university study of composition and literary analysis, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills at reading literature as a source of help in improving their own creative writing. Designed primary for students interested in creative writing, the course focuses on the reading of literature from the point of view of the practice, or craft, of fiction writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 302 | Open
The turn of the nineteenth century, also known as the Age of Revolution, saw deep cultural, political and economic changes in Western society, which caused equally deep and long-lasting innovations in the understanding of the self as a liberated individual in a necessary relationship with nature and a political whole. These changes are reflected in, or sometimes anticipated by, the literature of the time. Famous for its poetry, the Romantic period also saw the publication of ground-breaking novels, political pamphlets, essays, memoirs and other texts destined to radically alter the idea of literature, committing to individual self-expression and a breaking of any imposed aesthetic or formal rule. The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to one of the most innovative and paradigm-changing periods in literature through the study of the ongoing interplay between cultural contexts and individual work during the Romantic period.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 303 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course focuses on the novel of the Victorian period analyzing the reasons which led to the predominance of the form and how it succeeded in balancing mass popularity and aesthetic complexity. The study of the possible critical approaches to the texts and the identification of the formal structures which govern the novel will be an integral part of the course, as will a consideration of the novel’s relationship to cultural and historical changes in the period. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 306 H | Open
Pre-requisite: his course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required. One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor.
This course considers the importance of the transatlantic slave trade and its aftermath to American and British fiction. Following a brief survey of the historical context of slavery and the slave trade, students will read British and American slave narratives and consider their creative afterlife in a selection of novels. They will be introduced to the literary conventions of the genre of slave, free men and free women writings. From that understanding, students will then consider how aspects of these narratives are deployed or reworked in a selection of novels. Focusing on the transatlantic links between these texts, topics for discussion will include: the relevance of gender in these narratives, the politics of the family, conceptions of freedom and national identity, the construction of reading and education as a liberating force, contemporary anxieties about capitalist economies and new technologies, and ethical debates about what it is to be human.

This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in English Literature or permission of the instructor
This course is an upper-level course designed to provide a thorough investigation of a limited number of texts or of a specific central unifying theme that can be chosen either from Western or non-Western literature. The course invites students to take a closer look both at the text or theme in question and at the world out of which the focal subject developed. Through the comparative analysis of literary texts from diverse cultures, students will come to see how cultural differences can influence such elements as narrative, structure, literary style, plot conventions, point of view, or the construction of character and voice. They will also be able to see how similar literary themes may be handled with different emphases by different cultures, or how cultural biases can result in different or even completely opposite moral conclusions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 315A | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course explores in some depth a particular period, theme(s), or genre in American Literature. Students study the major historical and cultural contexts out of which the works grew. An important aim of the course is to deepen students' knowledge of a certain topic through a choice of representative writers and works. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 370 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course focuses on the core function of narrative across disciplines. Understanding how narratives work is essential to communicate effectively on any subject, through any medium. We use stories to understand and interpret our world and our place in it. Students will be introduced to the critical principles, terminology, and applications of narrative studies as they were first developed in literary and cultural theory. From there, the course considers how narratives are used in selected fields, from film to business, from politics to artificial intelligence. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 397 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This is a one-credit course in research methodology and practices for the development of a thesis in English Literature. The course is intended for English literature majors in their penultimate term. Students will be introduced to the practicalities of thesis writing. Starting with the identification of a viable research topic, students will learn to articulate their research question/s, will identify and assess scholarly material to formulate a literature review, will engage with appropriate theoretical frameworks, and produce an annotated bibliography. Students will present and critique each other’s thesis proposal, research methodology and choice of material. They will also prepare an oral presentation of their proposed thesis topic. By the end of course students will possess the research foundations that will allow them to write their thesis.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN/GDR 333 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above and one previous English literature class or Junior Standing
Gender plays a role in every literary text produced and read. This course examines gender studies from a formal and historical perspective within literature and asks what “gender” means and how it operates within the field of textual studies. Students will examine gender, from an intersectional point of view, in the creation, reception, and meaning-making of texts. Students will gain familiarity with critical texts within feminism, queer theory, and affect theory and use these tools to approach a variety of literary texts.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN/HS 315-A | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Design

3.0 Credits
Design | Course #: AS 260 | Open
Pre-requisite: This class requires a materials fee of €75/$85 to cover all basic art supplies
This foundational course provides students with the knowledge and skills to explore and demonstrate a range of fundamental Art and Design principles, production processes as well as materials and visualization skills appropriate to introductory study in 3D art and design. The course encompasses a diverse range of practices from designer-makers (such as fashion designers, jewelers and product designers) to conceptual sculptors and installation artists. Through practical projects, this course will engage with a variety of media and encourage students to think ‘spatially’. Principles such as balance, form, function, ergonomics, scale, and repetition and their relationship to 3D will be explored alongside strategies of making. Students will also explore the relationships between Artist / Audience and Designer / Consumer, allowing this course to be equally relevant to students from studio and non-studio arts backgrounds.
Contact Hours: 45

Economics and Finance

3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102 Recommended: EN 105
This course introduces the students to the basic principles of microeconomics and the study of the behavior of individual agents, such as consumers and producers. The first part of the course reviews the determinants of supply and demand, the characteristics of market equilibrium, the concept of social welfare, and the consequences of price controls, taxation, and externalities on social welfare. The second part of the course deals with market theory, with a review of cost concepts and market structures: competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA102 Recommended: EN 105
An introduction to the basic principles of the macro economy, such as national income accounting, determination of national income, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, macroeconomics in the open economy, and economic growth.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202, MA 198
This course delves deeper into the foundations of microeconomic theory, and analyzes the subject from a theoretical rather than practical point of view. Students will become familiar with the tools used by microeconomists in the analysis of consumer and producer behavior. The first part of the course reviews consumer theory and discusses budget constraints, preferences, choice, demand, consumer’s surplus, equilibrium, externalities, and public goods. The second part of the course reviews producer theory: technology, profit maximization, cost minimization, cost curves, firm and industry supply, and monopoly.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 302 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202
The subject matter of this course is the nature and determination of a country's most important measures of economic well being: aggregate output and unemployment, and of a series of related variables such as inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates. The course presents a few economic models that can be used as tools to understand the behavior of these aggregates, as well as to evaluate alternative economic policies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 316 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, EC 202
An introduction to international trade and finance. Analysis of the causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Major topics include international trade theory, international trade policy, exchange rates, open-economy macroeconomics, and international macroeconomic policy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: EC 201, EC 202, or MA 209
Econometrics is the use of statistical tools to test economic models. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of econometrics and will provide them with hands-on practical experience in the field. The course starts with a review of statistical tools and continues with the analysis of simple and multiple regression, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Some of the teaching time will be spent in the computer lab, where students will learn how to work with software.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 369 | Open
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302 and EC 360
The course surveys empirical papers in different fields of Economics exposing students to a variety of research questions and methods. Class discussions and assignments encourage students to critically engage in the various components of applied research in Economics, to link data analysis techniques to research applications and to learn how to communicate complex ideas in reports and presentations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 372 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
This course covers the structure and role of financial markets and institutions such as commercial banking, investment banking, and major equity, debt, and derivative markets and includes discussion of management, performance, and regulatory aspects. The course also examines the functions of central banks and monetary policy for these financial markets and institutions. Case studies and real life examples are also disseminated throughout the course to allow students the additional exploration of national and international implications of financial markets, including those concerning credit crisis, their causes, and the likely reverberations and regulatory reforms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: MKT/EC 361 | Open
This course will examine current trends in data science, including those in big data analytics, and how it can be used to improve decision-making across different fields, such as business, economics, social and political sciences. We will investigate real-world examples and cases to place data science techniques in context and to develop data-analytic thinking. Students will be provided with a practical toolkit that will enable them to design and realize a data science project using statistical software.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 201 | Open
Introduction to basic accounting methods and concepts; preparation of principal financial statements; application of accounting principles to the main asset, liability, and owners' equity accounts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201
This course focuses on the role of accounting in the management process and where accounting can provide critical support to management decision making. Cost-volume relations are introduced, along with identification of costs relevant to management decisions. Process costing and job costing systems are covered. The development of a master plan, preparation of flexible budgets, and responsibility accounting are covered, and the influences of quantitative techniques on managerial accounting are introduced.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201, FIN 202, EC 202, MA 208
This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 312 | Open
This course concentrates on the operation and function of securities markets. It emphasizes basic techniques for investing in stocks and bonds. Technical analysis is introduced and portfolio theory discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 330 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
The course emphasizes the structure and analysis of international capital and financial markets, Euro-currency financing, and the financing of international transactions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 330 H | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301. This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required.
The course emphasizes the structure and analysis of international capital and financial markets, Euro-currency financing, and the financing of international transactions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 335 | Open
Entrepreneurial activity is a powerful engine for growth in today’s economy. The financial issues confronting entrepreneurial firms are drastically different from those faced by established companies; this course is designed to address those unique financial issues and develop a set of skills appropriate for such situations. The course will be articulated in three main parts: 1) investment analysis – understanding sources of value, reading financial statements and using pro-forma models in the context of acquisitions; 2) financing the entrepreneurial firm – various sources of capital, including seed and angel financing, crowdfunding, venture capital and strategic alliances; 3) harvesting – investment exit strategies including IPOs and acquisition by a third party.

NOTE: the course is opened to all students interested in entrepreneurship. While some prior knowledge of finance will be helpful, the basic concepts will be covered in the course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 340 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
Focusing on both theory and application, the course will cover forward, futures, swaps and options markets. Students will learn how derivatives markets operate, and how derivatives are priced and used, in order to understand the importance of derivative instruments in business and the economy. Special attention will be paid to the mechanics of derivative instruments and the markets in which they trade, using the Law of One Price and arbitrage forces to develop derivatives pricing models, applying derivatives pricing models using real world data, communicating derivative hedging strategies and applying speculative strategies using derivatives.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 360 | Open
Pre-requisite: FIN 201, FIN 202, and FIN 301; Junior standing
Despite the frequency and magnitude of Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) activity, M&As have a poor track record of success. Building on the premise that what happens after the deal is signed is as critical as the deal-making itself, in this course the student will research general literature, case studies, and practitioner experiences to build the knowledge necessary to address the financial, strategic and organizational challenges of acquisitions, with a view to realizing the promise of value creation. Specifically, the course explores the role of M&As in corporate strategy, domestically, overseas and across borders. It also reviews the fundamental building blocks: identification, valuation, negotiation, due diligence, deal structuring, financing, and integration.
Contact Hours: 45

Foreign Languages

4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 101 | Open
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in French. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Nnote: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or FR 101.
A continuation of FR 101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory French I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or FR 102.
The course is designed to study in-depth the following grammar points: verb tenses in the indicative and subjunctive moods, sequence of tenses, relative pronouns, and the use of prepositions and conjunctions. It concentrates on consolidating specific communicative tasks, including stating opinions and constructing hypotheses, in both speaking and writing. Specialized vocabulary is expanded and appropriate variables in register are introduced in expository writing and conversation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
French Language | Course #: FR 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or French 201
A continuation of French 201. While continuing the review of grammar, the course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills in the context of the French and francophone culture. Literary readings, newspaper articles, and films, are an essential component of this course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: GRK 101 | Open
This course is a first introduction to the study of the Ancient Greek language. It is designed to equip the student with the basics (grammar, vocabulary, syntax) of the Ancient Greek in its most widely known form, that of the dialect of classical Athens.

The aim of this course is to give a thorough introduction and preparation for reading original texts written by Aesop, Menander, Xenophon and others. Being an introductory course, no knowledge of Ancient Greek is assumed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: GRK 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: GRK 101 or permission of the instructor
After a brief review of key grammar and morphology from Greek 101, the course will complete the process of providing students with a sufficient grasp of Greek vocabulary, morphology and syntax to enable them to read unadapted passages from ancient Greek authors (with the aid of a lexicon) by the end of the course. There will be short readings of selections from Aesop, Lucian and Greek epigrams.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: GRK 282 | Open
Pre-requisite: GRK 102 or permission of the instructor
The course will offer students the opportunity to read original Greek texts as well as improve their command of accidence, syntax and vocabulary. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course and depending on the levels, texts will be chosen to match those levels. The course will emphasize reading Greek for cultural, historical, and social content as well as improving grammar and vocabulary. Texts may therefore vary but will be chosen from such Greek authors as Herodotus, Xenephon, Plato, Lucian, Cebe or the New Testament.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 101 | Open
Pre-requisite:
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 103 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is the equivalent to 101 and 102 and carries 6 semester credits
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
This six-credit course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of language study (Introductory Italian I and Introductory Italian II). The course is designed for highly motivated students who wish to develop communicative ability in Italian in a relatively short time.
Italian 103 is conducted mainly in Italian. Students must actively participate in class activities and participation is necessary to determine the final grade.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 102 or IT 103
A continuation of IT 102, this course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 201
A continuation of IT 201, this course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills. Readings include short stories and newspaper articles.
Contact Hours: 45
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 203 | Open
Pre-requisite: This course is the equivalent to 201 and 202 and carries 6 semester credits. Prerequisite: Placement, IT 102 0r 103
This six-credit course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of intermediate language study (Intermediate Italian I and Intermediate Italian II). The course is designed for highly motivated students who wish to consolidate their communicative ability in Italian while developing reading and composition skills.
Contact Hours: 120
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 301 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 202 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to develop the student's ability to write correctly in Italian while reinforcing oral communication skills. Contemporary texts provide the basis for class discussions geared toward expanding vocabulary and reviewing grammar. Students write weekly compositions, do oral presentations and keep a journal.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 302 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 301 or permission of instructor
In this course students will be guided through a variety of types of writing and styles (e.g. journalistic, business and professional, essay.) Although mainly designed for advanced non-native speakers, the course may also be taken by native speakers who wish to improve their writing skills. Students will reinforce their knowledge of grammar and syntax as well as develop vocabulary. In addition, students will learn fundamental writing techniques such as organizing ideas, selecting examples, drawing conclusions and using the appropriate style for the given genre or mode of discourse.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 308 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 310 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 301 pr permissions of the instructor
The course will introduce students to the study of Italian literature; it is designed for those students who have reached 300-level proficiency in Italian language and also functions as a preparatory course for those who wish to study Italian literature at higher levels. The first part of the course focuses on a preliminary explanation of basic literary terminology and teaches students to recognize codes and genres in a limited selection of Italian literary texts. In the second part of the course, students will read samples from significant works of Italian literature in conjunction with selected passages from the canon of Italian literary criticism. They will practice their critical and writing skills by applying the concepts learned during the course to the analysis and reading of the literary texts under consideration. At an introductory level, students will begin to appreciate the difference between commentary and criticism and between both historical and formal approaches to the study of Italian literature.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 317 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 301, or permission of the instructor.
The topics studied, based primarily on literary texts but also taking into consideration other areas such as contemporary history, social studies, and art history, include some of the major themes of Italian culture as well as examples of the various identities that Italy offers today: the role played by Italian intellectuals in the construction of Italy as a Nation, the Mafia and the long-lasting institution of family-based structures, the ideal of beauty, modern design, contemporary literary production. Some of the key authors of Italian literature such as Dante, Petrarca, Machiavelli, Calvino and Pasolini will guide us to the complex process of Italian culture configuration through different ages. Italian political cinema (Bellocchio, Moretti, Giordana) will be also part of our study of the mulilayered identity of Italian culture tradition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 335 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 301 or permission of the instructor
The course offers and in-depth exploration of a particular theme or period in Italian literature. Attention will be given to the historical and cultural contexts in which the selected works grew. Possible topics include: The Italian Novel, Short Stories and Italian Regional Identity, Women Writers, The Italian Poetic Tradition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITS 292 | Open
Pre-requisite: EN 110; Please note that this course could fulfill the English Literature general requirements.)
This course is based on the analysis of excerpts from eight Italian novels that highlight the development of this genre in the twentieth century. Each student will also read one novel in its entirety. Through lectures and class discussions, emphasis will be placed on the author's social and political concerns and her or his role as writer and intellectual in Italian society. Students will also develop the ability to analyze literary texts according to language, style and content, and will be encouraged to participate in class discussions about the texts. In order to provide insight into the novels, as well as to stimulate classroom debate and discussion, the texts will be supplemented with selected background information, scholarly criticism, and visual media. Prerequisite: EN 110; Please note that this course could fulfill the English Literature general requirements.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LAT 101 | Open
Introduction to Latin syntax, vocabulary, and simple sentence structures. This first-semester course will complete all the first three declensions of nouns, present, imperfect, future and perfect verb tenses, subject, object and possessive pronouns. Study of cognate words in Latin/English will be a frequent subject of study. The course will also examine the Roman cultural context such as history, daily life, religion mythology and politics. Students will translate sentences for practice from English to Latin and vice versa on a daily basis. There will be an introduction to continuous prose passages from the original authors or adapted for study to be translated throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LAT 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: LAT 101 or permission of the instructor
This course provides continued study of accidences and syntax, treating all tenses of the verb in the subjunctive, indirect discourse, paraphrastic constructions and deponents. Vocabulary development is continued through intensive reading of selections of Latin prose. Students are also introduced to verse forms and the study of inscriptions. Assignments focus on translation from English to Latin and Latin to English.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LAT 282 | Open
Pre-requisite: LAT 102 or permission of the instructor
This course is designed to offer the opportunity to read texts in the original to students with a basic level of Latin language preparation. The level of readings may range from intermediate to advanced. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course, and students will be arranged in suitable reading groups. Texts appropriate to each group's level will be chosen by the professor and the individual students. Texts will vary, but advanced students may choose from among annotated editions of Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Livy. All groups will work independently and in weekly reading groups with the professor, when issues of language, grammar, and literary technique will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
Spanish Language | Course #: SPAN 101 | Open
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Spanish. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit.
Contact Hours: 60
4.0 Credits
Spanish Language | Course #: SPAN 102 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or SPAN 101
A continuation of SPAN101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Spanish I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Spanish Language | Course #: SPAN 201 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or SPAN 102
A continuation of SPAN 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Spanish effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with Spanish and Hispanic culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Spanish Language | Course #: SPAN 202 | Open
Pre-requisite: Placement or SPAN 201
A continuation of SPAN 201. While continuing the review of grammar, the course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills in the context of Spanish and Hispanic cultures. Literary readings, newspaper articles, and films, are an essential component of the course.
Contact Hours: 45

History and Humanities

3.0 Credits
History | Course #: AH 391 | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History
The course explores what we do with “culturally significant” objects and why. It examines the histories and meanings of ownership, collecting and display in private and especially public venues. Thematically chosen case-studies from a variety of periods and places investigate how knowledge, values and power are constructed through classification and display. The course considers antecedents and alternatives to the modern museum. It examines current debates
about the functions, practices and ethics of cultural institutions by drawing on the disciplines of art history, art and design, communications, artistic and literary criticism, cultural criticism, anthropology, sociology, cultural and intellectual history, politics, international affairs, economics and, especially, “museum studies.”
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: AH 391 H | Open
Pre-requisite: One previous course in Art History
The course explores what we do with “culturally significant” objects and why. It examines the histories and meanings of ownership, collecting and display in private and especially public venues. Thematically chosen case-studies from a variety of periods and places investigate how knowledge, values and power are constructed through classification and display. The course considers antecedents and alternatives to the modern museum. It examines current debates
about the functions, practices and ethics of cultural institutions by drawing on the disciplines of art history, art and design, communications, artistic and literary criticism, cultural criticism, anthropology, sociology, cultural and intellectual history, politics, international affairs, economics and, especially, “museum studies.”
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 120 | Open
A survey of the history and major cultural achievements of the ancient Egyptians, early Near-Eastern civilizations, Ancient Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on those achievements which have formed the basis of Western Civilizations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 121 | Open
This course surveys European history from the Reformation to the present, concentrating on the intellectual, political, and economic transformations that marked the advent of Western modernity and on what these changes meant for the people living through them. An additional focus of the course is the evolving relationship between Europe and the rest of the world over the time period covered. Like HS 120, this course also provides an introduction to the practice of history, i.e., how historians go about reconstructing and interpreting the past.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 200 | Open
This course introduces students to the practice of history, that is, how professional historians investigate, reconstruct, and interpret the past. Students will examine a variety of methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives that historians have employed in studying a particular historical problem (the topic varies from semester to semester). Students will also engage directly in practicing history by analyzing a variety of primary and secondary sources and carrying out a significant research project related to the topic of the semester.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 201 | Open
Contemporary discussions of globalization often suffer from a certain short-sightedness. It is all-too-frequently treated as a recent creation of twentieth- and twenty-first-century world economies and information networks. Both its advocates and its critics too often assume that the history of globalization has been the history of the “westernization” of economic and cultural practices. This course provides a deeper and longer term introduction to the complex forces and far-from-one-sided cross-cultural interactions that have been “globalizing” our planet since the development of settled agriculture. Among the aspects of globalization’s history that are covered are the development of market conventions, the spread of religious and cultural traditions, ecological exchanges, transport technologies and networks, migration, the role of violence, and industrialization and deindustrialization.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 210 | Open
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 211 | Open
Pre-requisite: Recommended: HS 210
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from World War I through the aftermath of the Cold War. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of twentieth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the experience and significance of the World Wars and the Cold War, the development of democratic, authoritarian, and 'totalitarian' political systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirements for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 233 | Open

This course explores the history and culture of the Italian Renaissance (c.1300-c.1600 CE) through the critical examination of primary sources – ranging from formal treatises to iconography and art – as well as current scholarly debates. Among other things, the course will examine the development and significance of Renaissance humanism, including the roles that its revival and transformation of Greek and Roman ideals played in distinguishing Renaissance culture from what came before. Other dimensions may include “civic humanism” and the Florentine Republic, the rise of
princely courts and associated cultural movements, the ideal of the “universal man” and its embodiment in figures like Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance’s social and economic contexts (including the experiences, activities, and perceptions of marginalized groups, like women, minorities, and people of lower social standing), as well as other key religious, artistic, literary, and intellectual developments of the period.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 235 | Open
This course explores the major events, intellectual developments, and artistic achievements that shaped the history and culture of Europe and Byzantium from the 4th to the 11th centuries. The course treats such issues as the migrations and political restructuring of Late Antiquity, the Christianization of Europe, the development of feudalism, the rise of the Dar al-Islam and its relations with Europe and the Byzantine world, heresy and orthodoxy, and religious reform movements.

Satisfies "Medieval History" core course requirement for History majors

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 236 | Open
Pre-requisite: Recommended: HS 235
This course will continue analyzing main political events, changes and cultural achievements of the High Middle Ages until the discovery of the New World. Topics covered include Seljuk Turks in Asia Minor, Pope Gregory VII and the idea of a Crusade, the Crusades and Latin states of the Levant, the Spanish reconquista, Italian city states and their culture, Slavic kingdoms and states in the Balkans, the rise of Mongols and its consequences for Europe, the Plague, Medieval Russia, and the Ottoman Turks and the fall of Constantinople.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 280 | Open
A survey of American political and cultural history from the Colonial period to the present. The emphasis will be on such topics as the development of democracy, the taming of the wilderness/frontier, the "melting pot," slavery and race relations, and the growth of the U.S. as an industrial and political world power.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 283 | Open
This course will examine the transformation of the United States from a peripheral country to a world power. The course will analyze the causes of that transformation, focusing on industrialization, the First World War, the Great Depression, changes in American social thought and literature, the Second World War, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the search for a new world order. Special attention will be devoted to democracy and freedom, the role of race, the impact of immigration, as well as the post-war student and protest movements.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 284 | Open
This course examines the history of immigration to the United States since the beginning of the nineteenth century. In it, students will use historical and anthropological sources to study the causes of immigration and the social, cultural and economic adaptation of immigrants to the American way of life. Significant attention will be given to immigrants’ experiences in the United States and the various processes through which immigration has shaped American identities, politics and society.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 290 | Open
Pre-requisite: On previous course in History
This course aims to broaden students understanding of the history, culture and contemporary situations of Native Americans. The course uses historical, literary, and anthropological analysis to explore American Indian life and culture. It also examines the contemporary legal and social institutions that affect Native American life. Topics treated include: history of the indigenous peoples of North, Central and South America, Native American religion, Native American economic development, and Native American oral and written literatures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 324 | Open
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
4.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 324 H | Open
Pre-requisite: This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required
This course examines the rise and decline of beliefs in magic and witchcraft – the supposed power of humans to intervene in natural events and to harm others by supernatural means – in medieval and early modern Europe, up to the outburst of the so-called “witch craze.” It studies social, cultural, literary, judicial, religious, gender, economic, and environmental aspects of these beliefs, and their roots in such things as classical Greek and Roman literary traditions and popular folklore. Students will analyze primary sources in English, such as early literary texts elaborating on witch
beliefs, the infamous handbook for inquisitors, Hammer of Witches, the records of early modern trials, and intellectual reflections on the reality or otherwise of magic and witchcraft, and a variety of contemporary historiographical explanations. Students will thus be helped to frame magic and witchcraft in their historical, anthropological, environmental, sociological, and intellectual contexts, and to enrich their understanding the evolution of medieval and early modern European societies and cultures.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 369 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EN 110
Native American resistance has occurred throughout the centuries and continues at present. This seminar aims at analyzing historic and contemporary Native American strategies of survival and the various forms of interaction and relations they have had with the U.S Government. Starting with an examination of different processes of territorial colonization of Indigenous territories and resources, the seminar will then investigate the legal, political, social, and cultural significance of resistance and self-determination.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 379 | Open
This course will examine the European cultural and intellectual experience from the 1870s. Positivism, Liberalism, Idealism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, and Existentialism will be discussed, focusing on the relation between ideas and arts, politics, and economics. We will pursue a number of themes, including the emergence of distinct class identities, religion, and morality, new forms of nationalism, and the changing nature of selfhood. Special attention will be given to the "crisis of the end of the century," the transformation of political and social thought, and the rise of authoritarian and totalitarian idelogies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/RL | Open
The period of Late Antiquity, between 200 CE and 600/700 CE, connects the classical times and the medieval age, laying the foundations for the construction of specific cultural, social and religious identities between Europe and the Mediterranean basin. These regions constitute an exclusive laboratory for analyzing and critically discussing processes of formation and the transmission of cults, rites, magical traditions and practices between different cultural and political environments. In the context of the evolution of the Roman State first, and then of its fragmentation, ancient magic traditions and ritual practices mixed with more recent ideas, questioning personal, social, and cultural identities and giving rise to new relational models. The birth of the concept of paganism, the emergence of ideal boundaries delimiting the licit and the illicit, the transmission, transformation and reuse of magical objects and rituals, astrological knowledge, as well as mystery cults, make the late antique period a cosmos rich in transformative and generative patterns. The understanding of these elements is fundamental both to grasp the developments of the following period, and to evaluate the contributions of the ancient and classical heritage in shaping how by magic means, cults, and ritual practices, men and women of Late Antiquity tried to make sense of their world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/RS 321 | Open
Pre-requisite: Satisfies "Early Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
History Research Seminar: 300-level history courses designated by the prefix HS-RS indicate courses being offered as Research Seminars. These courses are writing-intensive and help to train students to carry out original research by guiding them through the preparation of a significant research paper. History majors are encouraged to take these before their senior year, and especially before the semester in which they prepare their thesis.
Today, we often celebrate pirates, runaway slaves, witches, and frontiersmen as adventurous spirits, rebels against oppression, and pioneers of a more egalitarian world. In their own time, they were condemned as blood-thirsty, unnatural, and in some cases, literally demonic. Both views have validity, neither captures how they experienced their lives, nor their historical significance. In this course, we will attempt to come to a better understanding of their lives and significance by exploring the basic features of their daily lives and mental universes, the political, social, and gendered norms against which they rebelled, and the varied roles they played in the development of the early modern Atlantic World. We will also grapple with the difficulties historians face in reconstructing the lives of people who left few written records themselves, but about whom much was written. To this end, we will examine a variety of methods that scholars have employed to better understand these people and their world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/RS 372 | Open
Coming Soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/RS 373 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course examines the history of the Second World War in its worldwide dimension. Considerable attention wi