John Cabot University
Summer 5 weeks I 2022
3 - 6 credits

With a location in the historic center of Rome, and an international student body, a summer at JCU is far more than the typical study abroad experience. SAI summer students at JCU can choose from more than 100 courses taught in English, including specialized courses in Engineering and Math. Students in JCU’s 5 week summer programs select 1 or 2 courses from the large offering for a total of 3 - 6 credits. SAI offers two Summer 5 week sessions at JCU, each with different start dates and course options: Summer I and Summer II.


Application: now open
Closes: March 3, 2022
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Digital photo (passport style)
Italian privacy consent form
Supplemental JCU privacy consent form

Highlights

  • See our revised policies due to Coronavirus here.
  • Courses emphasize exposure to the city with on-site learning at museums and historic sites.
  • $500 scholarship for STEM students.

Program Dates
May 18, 2022 – June 25, 2022


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

*contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 85+ (internet based) or IELTS: 6.5+.



Art History and Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
Business, Law, Management, and Marketing
Classical Studies
Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science
Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language
Economics and Finance
Engineering
Foreign Languages
History and Humanities
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology
Studio Art

Art History and Archaeology

3.0 Credits
Archeology | Course #: ARCH 204 | Open
Instructor: Jens Koehler
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Partially on-site; activity fee: 25 Euro or 33 USD
The course is an upper-level survey of technology in the ancient world, with particular emphasis on Greece and Rome. The course provides an in-depth familiarity and appreciation of the multifaceted nature of ancient technology through which students will gain a firm understanding of the links between technological innovation (history of engineering) and the development of human civilization (social history). It examines the architecture, waterworks, war machinery, and entertainment industry that framed and generated technological innovations, as well as production techniques related to the working of metal, wood and ceramics. The course will draw on both archaeological and text-based sources, and students will gain an awareness of field-specific methods and research theories: historical, philological and archaeological.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 267 | Open
Instructor: Silvia Armando
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Usually overlooked or excluded by established, traditional narratives of medieval art, the study of medieval Sicily provides an opportunity to cross conventional academic boundaries to discover a vibrant and diverse medieval artistic production. Adopting a global and multidisciplinary approach, which includes examination of archaeological remains, analysis of important monuments and luxury artefacts, attention to techniques and materiality, and a reading of some key written sources, the course will ask questions about the relationship between artistic production, international politics, and the multicultural traditions of the island. The course will consider Sicily’s cultural interchanges with Byzantium, Islamic lands and the so-called Latin West. Questions related to the impact of transnational geopolitics and the island’s own multi-lingual and multi-religious populations will be addressed in order to examine and understand the art of medieval Sicily within a broader, multicultural, setting.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 290 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Sophy Downes
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site activity fee 40 euros or $52
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the late Bronze Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. On site activity fee may apply. On Site Activity Fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 293 | Open
Instructor: Laura Foster
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: (On-site; may have an activity fee)
Rome City Series - The urban development and architecture of modern Rome are perhaps the least studied aspects of the city's history. The 150th anniversary of Italian unity, celebrated in 2011, and recent work on architecture under the Fascist regime have created a new interest in Rome as a modern capital. To many foreign visitors, however, the contemporary city is simply a frame through which to see monuments of a glorious but distant past. This course will examine the vast transformations in the urban and architectural development of Rome that took place between 1870 and 1945, with special look at the new role that they city's historic monuments, from antiquity to the 18th century, played in representing the city as the capital of a modern nation-state and as the emblem of a new empire under Mussolini. We will also consider contemporary urban questions: Why has there been so little modification to the center of Rome since the 1940s? What space is available for new construction and how do contemporary architectural projects relate to those of the past? These questions and others will be explored through in-class lectures and on-site exploration of the city.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 298 | Open
Instructor: Paul Tegmeyer
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: On-site: activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - An on-site course that enables the student to visit many of the major and minor monuments of Baroque Rome - churches, palaces,piazze, etc. - and thus to study firsthand important works by such artists as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio and Pietro da Cortona, among others. On site activity fee may apply.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 383 | Open
Instructor: Sarah Linford
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: One previous course in art history or permission of the instructor.
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the modern and contemporary world. Courses are normally research-
led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45

Arts and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Theater and Film Studies | Course #: DMA/CMS 387 | Open
Instructor: Marco Ferrari
Monday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Wednesday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Though often overlooked, the act of projection is at the heart of cinema (the act or process of causing a picture to appear on a surface). This studio course focuses on the creation of moving image-based work, exploring how time and space are used as materials to create form and inspire content within the contemporary film genre known as expanded cinema. The technical, historical and psychological aspects of the projected image will be studied in order to re-think cinema as a group and investigate how the projected image can find meaning outside the black box of theaters or the white cube of galleries. Two personal experimental video projects will lead to a final group video installation that will use the environment within the vicinity of John Cabot University’s campus (Trastevere neighborhood) to inspire site-specific works while also becoming the location of the final outdoor projection event.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Law, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Open
Instructor: Michele Favorite
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 305 | Open
Instructor: Nicholas Friedlander Ducoff
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: Sophomore standing
This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems, and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. Students will have the opportunity to identify a business opportunity and develop the idea to the point of being start-up ready.This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non-business majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 330 | Open
Instructor: Ieva Jakobsone Bellomi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EC 202. Recommended: MKT 301
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: ETH/BUS 301 | Open
Instructor: Annette Merle Bryson
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a "free market," the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of "ethical" consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: PL/LAW 320 | Open
Instructor: Luigi Sensi
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
This course examines the basic concepts of public international law, to enable students to critically evaluate the interplay between legal claims and power relations. Starting with a theoretical overview of the character, development and sources of international law, the course examines such law-generating and law-implementing institutions as the United Nations, international arbitration and adjudication, international criminal tribunals, national systems and regional organizations. Such substantive areas as the law of war (the use of force and humanitarian law), international criminal law, human rights, and environmental law will be given special attention.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing; Internship in the field of Business obtained through the Career Services Center
Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid.

The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC).

After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.

* This course is requirement of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: BUS/EC 336 | Open
Instructor: Alina Sorgner
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course considers some of the most important issues concerning contemporary challenges in the field of entrepreneurship. Students will be confronted with interdisciplinary perspectives to the study of entrepreneurship that stem from economics, psychology, geography, history, cultural studies, and policy making, to better understand the emergence and the determinants of entrepreneurial ecosystems.

In the first part of the course, we will study the role of an individual in entrepreneurial ecosystems, e.g. psychological and biological characteristics of entrepreneurs; determinants of successful entrepreneurship including early entrepreneurial career development in the childhood, role models in the family, human and social capital, and the importance of geographical location of a start-up, among others. We will further consider particularities of female entrepreneurship, ethnic entreprenurship, social entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. Last but not least, we will study the relationship between entrepreneurhsip and individual well-being, for instance, in terms of life and job satisfaction, as well as entrepreneurial incomes and health issues.

In the second part of the course, we will focus on regional entrepreneurial ecosystems and the role of entrepreneurship for economic welfare. We will consider historical examples of productive, unproductive and even destructive entrepreneurship, study the role of regional culture and legacies of anti-entrepreneurial political regimes for the current level of entrepreneurial activities. Moreover, we will discuss the role of entrepreneurship for regional economic development, e.g. job creation and innovation activities. Last but not least, we will investigate the currently occurring move of developed economies toward more entrepreneurial societies and we will discuss various pro-entrepreneurial public policies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Open
Instructor: Mark R. Leffler
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 310 | Open
Instructor: Ieva Jakobsone Bellomi
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: MGT 301
The course examines human personality, behavior and relationships as applied to business, industrial and organizational settings. Topics include: social systems at work; human needs, attitudes, human relations; leadership patterns, group dynamics, teamwork, communication, motivation, participation and reward system; technology and people, managing change, models of organizational behavior and management. Teamwork and group participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 330 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MGT 301, MA 208
Management issues related to the procurement and allocation of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design, facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Open
Instructor: Antonella Salvatore
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: EC 201, MA 208
This course will give students a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the strategic marketing planning process including: methods and tools of market assessment, customer segmentation analysis, development of the value proposition, positioning and planning of marketing tactics designed to deliver value to targeted stakeholders.

Emphasis is placed on the need to align marketing principles and theories with the management skills needed for the preparation of a marketing plan. Students will be able to analyze opportunities and threats in both the macro and micro-environments. Students will also conduct a marketing research gathering data for effective decision-making and will develop their ability to evaluate gaps.

In this course, students will begin to learn how to conduct a competitive analysis, analyze environmental trend, forecast changing market demand and develop competitive marketing strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 310 | Open
Instructor: Cindy Pham
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course focuses on the study of consumer decision processes, consumer behavior models and their impact on the development of marketing strategies. The emphasis is on researching and in-depth understanding of the consumer decision process. Teaching methodology includes case studies and an emphasis on experiential research.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 320 | Open
Instructor: Tetyana Kholod
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Open
Instructor: Tatyana Kholod
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 340 | Open
Instructor: Peter Paul Schelfhaudt
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, MKT 301
This course approaches Internet marketing from a marketing management perspective. The course looks at the Internet both as a tool to be used in the marketing planning process and as an element of a company's marketing mix. The course explores how traditional marketing concepts such as market segmentation, research, the 4Ps and relationship marketing are applied using the Internet and other electronic marketing techniques. Website design is not covered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 360 | Open
Instructor: Elissa Ruffino
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
During the course students will undertake studies on brand assessment, goal setting; defining brand equity and target; Crafting a Communication Strategy; Establishing the Marketing, Communications, Public Relations and Media Strategies; Building the Marketing Plan; and Measurement and Strategic Brand Audit. Students will complete a group project where they choose a brand or create their own and take on the role as brand manage to build, manager and market a brand using successful public relations, communications, and media strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 399 | Open
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, MKT 301
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Classical Studies

3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 260 | Open
Instructor: Massimo Beletto
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities, and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 261 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
This multi-disciplinary (philosophy, literature, history, law, art and archeology) course will examine sexuality and eroticism in antiquity, looking in particular at their role as an initiation to higher levels of thought and cognition; their impetus in defining gender roles; their existence as physiological/psychological needs versus social constructions; how they have invested modern thought, research, and become enduring models interpreting human behavior. Students will carry out a close study of selections from Greek and Roman lyric poetry, Greek drama, philosophy and essays, Roman satire and Ovid’s epics on love and extensive writing to analyze the context and content of the readings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL 278 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grad of C or above
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Open
Instructor: Massimo Beletto
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 285 | Open
Using primary ancient sources (literary texts, artistic representations, and archaeological finds), this course will examine the role of wine drinking in ancient societies. Where and when did viticulture and wine making originate? Where did the custom of the reclining banquet come from, and what social implications did it carry? How was wine served and how was its consumption regulated? What type of entertainment was offered at these banquets? Our primary focus will be Greece and Rome, but important parallels or corollary practices in neighboring and modern cultures will also be considered.
Contact Hours: 45

Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism

3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Open
Instructor: Carolina De Luca
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 111 | Open
Instructor: Sarah Linford
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 210 | Open
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 230 | Open
Instructor: Federica Gianni
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 399 | Open
Instructor: Ibrahim Al-Marashi
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS 399 | Open
Instructor: Ibrahim Al-Marashi
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 241 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 243 | Open
Instructor: Peter Sarram
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; "Americans" in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini's Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a "character" in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scene. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of "places and spaces" (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/PL 399 | Open
Instructor: Fabio Cristiano
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Coming Soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: DMA/DJRN 340 | Open
Instructor: Kwame Phillips
Tuesday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Thursday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Since 2004 when it began, podcasting has grown in popularity, featuring subjects that range from politics to entertainment to history to self-help. This course will focus on the essential skills for podcast production and will give students a working knowledge of current trends in audio production. This course is designed to familiarize students with all aspects of podcasting and to train students to think critically about stories they consume. Students will learn how to identify an audience, distribute and market their podcast, all within a framework of ethical production.
Contact Hours: 45

Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science

3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 110 | Open
Instructor: Stefan Sorgner
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course helps students develop the advanced skills that are necessary in personal productivity office applications, such as word processing, data management and analysis, and presentation/slide design. The course follows best practices and reviews available internet tools for data storage.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 160 | Open
Instructor: Patrizio Angelini
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. The goal of this course is to advance students’ computational thinking, educate them to use programs as tools in their own field of study, and to provide them with fundamental knowledge of programming strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 212 | Open
Instructor: Carlos Theran Yohn Parra Bautista
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: CS 160, MA 100/101
Coming Soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 101 | Open
Instructor: Natalie Orlando
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.
This course is a review of intermediate algebra and has few prerequisites other than elementary familiarity with numbers and simple geometric concepts such as: finding the least common multiple of two or more numbers, manipulating fractions, calculating the area of a triangle, square, rectangle, circle, etc. Its objective is to prepare students for Pre-calculus.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 197 | Open
Instructor: Sara Munday
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to Calculus that focuses on the study of elementary functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, mainly oriented towards practical applications in business and economics. Particular emphasis will be placed on functions as the first step to analyzing real-world problems in mathematical terms.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Open
Instructor: Barrt Griffiths
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Open
Instructor: Carlos Theran Suarez
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; hypothesis testing, and an introduction to simple linear regression.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 209 | Open
Instructor: Ranjan Rojatgi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: CS 110, MA 208 with a grade of C- or above
A continuation of Statistics I. Topics include more advanced hypothesis testing, regression analysis, analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, time series analysis and decision- making techniques.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 299 | Open
Instructor: Sara Munday
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 198 with a grade of C- or above
The course is a further development of Calculus and at a more advanced level. After covering traditional topics such as techniques of integration, differential equations and the study of several variables, attention is given to business and economics applications (constrained optimization, Lagrange multipliers, Method of Least Squares, Numerical approximation, Taylor series, etc.)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 491 | Open
Instructor: Sara Munday
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 198
This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 495 | Open
Instructor: Barry Griffiths
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 299, MA 491 Multivariable calculus and Matrix Algebra
This course provides an introduction to ordinary differential equations. These equations contain a function of one independent variable and its derivatives. The term "ordinary" is used in contrast with the term partial differential equation which may be with respect to more than one independent variable. Ordinary differential equations and applications, with integrated use of computing, student projects; first-order equations; higher order linear equations; systems of linear equations, Laplace transforms; introduction to nonlinear equations and systems, phase plane, stability.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language

3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 350 | Open
Instructor: Elizabeth Farren
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 103 or 105 with a grade of C or above
The course aims to develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction; to develop self-editing skills; and to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing literary fiction. Students will read both contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, reading classmates' fiction, and producing and workshopping their own fiction. Students will compile a portfolio of the work they produce during the term. Students completing this workshop course will be familiar with the skills needed to produce literary fiction, to self-edit work in progress, and to discern the characteristics that make quality literary fiction.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 354 | Open
Instructor: Moira Egan
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110
To develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of poems; to develop self-editing skills; to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing poems.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW/DJRN 346 | Open
Instructor: Daniel Connelly
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: DJRN 329 | Open
Instructor: Giulia Rossi
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 105 | Open
Instructor: Andrea Rossi
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 110 | Section: 1 | Open
Instructor: Christin Campbell
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: Completion of EN 103 with a grade of C or above OR completion of EN 105 with a grade of C or above
This course reinforces the skills needed to write well-organized essays, focusing specifically on argumentative essays. Elements covered include thesis development, critical reading, organizing and outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and citation and documentation standards. Techniques of academic research and the use of the library and other research facilities are discussed. In addition to regular in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments, students are required to write a fully documented research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to fulfill the University English Composition requirement and to be eligible to take courses in English literature. Individual students in EN 110 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 110 | Section: 2 | Open
Instructor: Tara Keenan
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: Completion of EN 103 with a grade of C or above OR completion of EN 105 with a grade of C or above
This course reinforces the skills needed to write well-organized essays, focusing specifically on argumentative essays. Elements covered include thesis development, critical reading, organizing and outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and citation and documentation standards. Techniques of academic research and the use of the library and other research facilities are discussed. In addition to regular in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments, students are required to write a fully documented research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to fulfill the University English Composition requirement and to be eligible to take courses in English literature. Individual students in EN 110 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Language | Course #: EN 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing.
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 200 | Open
Instructor: Lewis Samuel Klausner
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
Presupposing no previous knowledge of literature, this course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in four genres, poetry, short story, drama and novel. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned text, use various critical approaches and write critical essays on the specified readings.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 211 | Open
Instructor: Stephanie Richards
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: EN110 with a grade of C or above
By examining short stories, this course develops students'™ critical abilities in reading and writing about narrative fiction. The students are introduced to a comparative perspective on literature and learn to identify and evaluate the short story'™s formal elements, acquiring the skill to read fiction critically, to look beyond the content, to appreciate the ambiguities and complexities of the literary text, and to communicate their findings in critical papers of academic quality. The selection of short stories may vary, offering a historical perspective, a thematic one, or a selection of masterpieces in the genre.
Contact Hours: 45

Economics and Finance

3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 201 | Open
Instructor: Sonia Dalmia
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102 Recommended: EN 105
This course introduces the students to the basic principles of microeconomics and the study of the behavior of individual agents, such as consumers and producers. The first part of the course reviews the determinants of supply and demand, the characteristics of market equilibrium, the concept of social welfare, and the consequences of price controls, taxation, and externalities on social welfare. The second part of the course deals with market theory, with a review of cost concepts and market structures: competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 202 | Open
Instructor: Sonia Dalmia
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA102 Recommended: EN 105
An introduction to the basic principles of the macro economy, such as national income accounting, determination of national income, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, macroeconomics in the open economy, and economic growth.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 316 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing, EC 201, EC 202
An introduction to international trade and finance. Analysis of the causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Major topics include international trade theory, international trade policy, exchange rates, open-economy macroeconomics, and international macroeconomic policy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 201 | Open
Instructor: Keith Wiliams Donnelly
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Introduction to basic accounting methods and concepts; preparation of principal financial statements; application of accounting principles to the main asset, liability, and owners' equity accounts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 202 | Open
Instructor: Silvia Pulino
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: FIN 201
This course focuses on the role of accounting in the management process and where accounting can provide critical support to management decision making. Cost-volume relations are introduced, along with identification of costs relevant to management decisions. Process costing and job costing systems are covered. The development of a master plan, preparation of flexible budgets, and responsibility accounting are covered, and the influences of quantitative techniques on managerial accounting are introduced.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 301 | Open
Instructor: David Shaffer
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: FIN 201, FIN 202, EC 202, MA 208
This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Finance | Course #: FIN 330 | Open
Instructor: Keith William Donnelly
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: FIN 301
The course emphasizes the structure and analysis of international capital and financial markets, Euro-currency financing, and the financing of international transactions.
Contact Hours: 45

Engineering

3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 200 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
This course will introduce the student to chemical engineering and the fundamental principles of chemical process analysis. The student will gain experience in the application of problem-solving techniques in a variety of process-related problems. Aspects of professional development as a chemical engineer will be presented and integrated into course material.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 210 | Open
Instructor: Susan Reynolds
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: MA 198
This course provides an introduction to statics, the branch of mechanics that is concerned with the analysis of loads (force and torque, or "moment") on physical systems in static equilibrium, that is, in a state where the relative positions of subsystems do not vary over time, or where components and structures are at a constant velocity. When in static equilibrium, the system is either at rest, or its center of mass moves at constant velocity. Course content includes vector algebra, forces, couples, moments, resultants of force couple systems; friction, equilibrium analysis of particles and finite bodies, centroids; and applications.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 211 | Open
Instructor: Javier Martin Montefort-Sanchez
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: ENGR 210
The course provides a study of the fundamentals of solid mechanics of deformable bodies. The engineering structures covered in this course are determinate and indeterminate assemblies of tension members, columns (including buckling), beams (flexural members), shafts (torsional members), and thin-walled pressure vessels (tanks). The course also contains an introduction to common categories and types of engineering materials and their failure mechanisms. The importance of safety factors and their application in the Allowable Stress Design philosophy is emphasized throughout the course, leading to an enhanced awareness of the professional and ethical responsibilities inherent to the role of the engineer.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 213 | Open
Instructor: Jason Ganley
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Principles of Chemistry; Introduction to Physics
This course provides an introduction to Thermodynamics, a branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work. It defines macroscopic variables, such as internal energy, entropy, and pressure that partly describe a body of matter or radiation. It states that the behavior of those variables is subject to general constraints that are common to all materials, not the peculiar properties of particular materials. These general constraints are expressed in the four laws of thermodynamics, which can be explained by statistical mechanics, in terms of the microscopic constituents. The course includes basic elements of classical thermodynamics, including first and second laws, properties of pure materials, ideal gas law, reversibility and irreversibility, and Carnot cycle; control volume analysis of closed simple systems and open systems at steady state; engineering applications, including cycles; psychrometrics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 220 | Open
Instructor: Jason Ganley
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 299
This course covers theory and application of fluid statics, momentum transfer, and viscous fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work covers both open-channel and conduit (pipe) flow. The fluid statics and dynamics of incompressible and compressible fluids are considered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 226 | Open
Instructor: Jeanne Wawrzynek Christman
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
An introduction to digital systems and microcontroller programming including basic logic functions, microprocessor architecture, input and display devices, sensors, motors, and C programming for microcontrollers. The emphasis is on programming a microcontroller in C for practical applications.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 227 | Open
Instructor: Mona Abdalla El Helbawy
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 240 | Open
Instructor: Eliza Adriana Banu
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Foreign Languages

3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 101 | Open
Instructor: Angela Eliseo
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite:
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 102 | Open
Instructor: Angela Eliseo
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 101
A continuation of IT 101, this course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 201 | Open
Instructor: Anna Mauceri Trimnell
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement, IT 102 or IT 103
A continuation of IT 102, this course focuses on consolidating the student's ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LAT 101 | Open
Instructor: Massimo Beletto
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Introduction to Latin syntax, vocabulary, and simple sentence structures. This first-semester course will complete all the first three declensions of nouns, present, imperfect, future and perfect verb tenses, subject, object and possessive pronouns. Study of cognate words in Latin/English will be a frequent subject of study. The course will also examine the Roman cultural context such as history, daily life, religion mythology and politics. Students will translate sentences for practice from English to Latin and vice versa on a daily basis. There will be an introduction to continuous prose passages from the original authors or adapted for study to be translated throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45

History and Humanities

3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 210 | Open
Instructor: Luca De Caprariis
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 211 | Open
Instructor: Vanda Wilcoz
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: Recommended: HS 210
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from World War I through the aftermath of the Cold War. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of twentieth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the experience and significance of the World Wars and the Cold War, the development of democratic, authoritarian, and 'totalitarian' political systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirements for History majors.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS 368 | Open
Instructor: Andrea Lanzone
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing, EN 110
The seminar analyzes the history of Counterculture in the United States of America and examines the impact that Counterculture had during the Sixties and early Seventies (and the legacy and influence that certain particular experiences and ideas have had on later generations). The Other America also aims through the words of Whitman, Steinbeck, Woody Guthrie, Kerouac, Dylan, Springsteen and many other writers, poets, activists and musicians to observe the inequities encountered by different American minorities in the 20th Century and to disclose their strategies of survival as they have sought justice and dignity.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/EC 399 | Open
Instructor: Scott Reynolds Nelson
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Topics may vary. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HS/RS 378 | Open
Instructor: Vanda Wilcox
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Philosophy and Religious Studies

3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH 210 | Open
Instructor: Annette Merle Bryson
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
The philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome debated fundamental questions with an imagination, subtlety, and daring that have captured the attention of thoughtful people in every epoch. For example, they considered the nature and origin of the universe, what changes and does not change, as well as what causes change, how perception and reasoning produce knowledge, the relation between the soul and the body, the meaning of justice and beauty, and the nature of the good life. Through a careful reading of selected texts – in the form of dialogues, poems, aphorisms, or treatises – the course will introduce you to the great questions and controversies of ancient philosophy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH 299 A | Open
Instructor: Amit Hagar
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Course description is currently unavailable. Please contact your admissions counselor for additional information.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH 299 B | Open
Instructor: Amit Hagar
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Topics vary. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH 325 | Open
Instructor: Yohn Jairo Parra Bautista
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This course examines some of the most important contemporary issues in the field of ethics of emerging technologies to help you to develop a familiarity with the debates and stimulate your ability to discuss, reflect on, and defend your own views.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH/RL 224 | Open
Instructor: Annette Merle Bryson
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
How are moral standards established? How do we differentiate right from wrong? Why should we be ethical? This course will seek to provide both religious and philosophical answers to these questions. We will begin studying the ethical code of Christianity, which provides us with a divine command to act ethically, and a divine example to imitate, that of Christ's sacrifice. We then compare this code to that of Buddhism, which uses the concepts of reincarnation and interdependency to instill morality in its adherents and stresses that human suffering can be overcome only through ethical action. We then turn to philosophical theories, studying the ethical theories of ancient Greek philosophers Aristotle and Plato, the duty ethics of modern philosopher Kant and postmodern philosopher Lvinas, the utilitarian ethics of Bentham and the ethics of desire of Spinoza, as well as Nietzsche's plea to rid ethics of morality. Finally, we will assess the relevance of these theories in a discussion of cultural relativism, and apply these views to current debates (euthanasia, abortion, ecology, bio-technology, suicide, the death penalty)
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Religious Studies | Course #: RL 221 | Open
Instructor: Michael Pettinger
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
The history of the Catholic church is essentially intertwined with the history of Western Civilization over the past 2,000 years. The aspirations and struggles of Christendom constitute the fabric of the Christian tradition as it unfolds throughout time. This course represents an historical survey of the Church from its primitive beginnings in Jerusalem (c. 33 A.D.) to the Pontificate of John Paul II (1920-2005). The development of the course will trace the major events, ideas and people that went into the shaping of the Western Church, without ignoring the fundamental importance and influence of the doctrine of Jesus Christ regarding the institution he founded.
Contact Hours: 45

Political Science

3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 209 | Open
Instructor: Diego Pagliarulo
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of International Affairs. The course discusses the main schools of international politics, the determinants and actors of foreign policy, the main conflicts which have characterized the post-World War II era, the problems of war and peace, and the recent trends in globalization.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 223 | Open
Instructor: Gabriele Simoncini
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
As both a subject and a method of study, comparative politics examines the nature, development, structure and functioning of the political systems of a selection of countries with very different cultures, social and economic profiles, political histories and geographic characteristics. Through case studies, students will learn to use the comparativist’s methods to collect and organize the information and develop general explanations.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 340 | Open
Instructor: Jack Mangala
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: PL 223
The definition of Third World has been applied to countries which, albeit located in different geographic areas of the globe, are affected by similar features and problems: recent independence from colonial rule, limited economic development, overpopulation, insufficient infrastructures and availability of public hygiene/health care/education, persisting dependency on developed countries and attempts at reducing or altogether eliminating it. The course will explore the various patterns with an emphasis on three aspects. The first will examine comparative theories of social backwardness and belated development, particularly those elaborated by Bairoch, Gerschenkron, Barrington Moore jr., Skocpol and others. The second will discuss geography and historical issues: colonialism, imperialism, decolonization and the impact of the Cold War being the main ones. The third will focus on the past couple of decades and the current situation. In examining country studies, particularly focused on the roots of democratic systems and of stability, the dichotomies of dictatorship and democracy, national sovereignty and human rights, globalization and autarchy will be analyzed and assessed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 357 | Open
Instructor: Ibrahim Al-Marashi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing
This course will cover the beginnings of this interaction from the rise of Islam as a faith to Italy’s involvement in the 2011 Libyan war and introduce the students to varying themes that characterize this interaction. This course will transcend wide expanses of time and geographic boundaries. We will cover the study of Muslim societies in Italy ranging from Medieval Muslim communities in Sicily and then jump to the North African Muslim communities of the 20th century. It will examine Italian excursions in the Middle East from the Crusades to the Italian experience in Libya in 1911. It will deal with the Middle Eastern commodities Italy imported from this region, ranging from sugar in the 13th century to oil in the 20th century. To sum up, this course focuses not only on diplomatic and political history, but on the circulation of ideas, the interaction between societies, and how trade and art forms created links between the Middle East and the Italian peninsula from the early Islamic era to the 21st century.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 366 | Open
Instructor: Luigi Sensi
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This course examines public policy challenges in addressing international environmental protection. Students will examine such issues as climate change, sustainable development, protection of biodiversity/ecosystems/species, resource extraction and energy, which involve conflicting value systems enmeshed in complex power relationships. This course draws students’ attention to issues of scale, interconnectedness, boundaries, and the importance of creating solutions that are workable across and between jurisdictions. Students will engage these global challenges in order to develop the knowledge, and the problem solving and communications skills, to facilitate environmental policy work in the international arena.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 398 | Open
Instructor: Ada Bertini Bezzi
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: GPA of 3.0 or higher; Junior Standing
The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL/LAW 323 | Open
Instructor: Silvia Scarpa
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: Junior Standing.
This course introduces the students to the phenomenon of international migrations. It will analyse the various theories of migrations, compare the migratory movements before and after 1945 and examine the present situation in various regions of the world. It will specifically study the impact of international migration on the economic and social development of sending and receiving countries, including the problem of integration in countries of destination, the benefits of remittances on countries of origin, the link between brain gain and brain drain and the phenomenon of circular migration. A comparison between immigration to the United States of America and to some European countries will be made to evaluate similarities and differences. The links among migration, security and globalization will be assessed and the issues of irregular immigration, smuggling of migrants and transnational human trafficking will be investigated. Finally, the specific case of persecuted asylum seekers and refugees escaping from their countries of origin will be analysed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL/LAW 399 | Open
Instructor: Mark Antonin Drumbi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course focuses on the ‘child soldier,’ namely, persons under the age of 18 who are associated with armed forces (national armies) and armed groups (rebel or terrorist organizations). Children have been enmeshed in armed conflict throughout all of human history. Today, roughly 250,000 children ‘soldier’ world-wide and their experiences differ widely. Child soldiering occurs on every continent. In recent decades, the use of children in armed conflict has moved from a matter of military ethics to a subject regulated by international law. This course identifies the ways in which children have become militarized through time and sets out contemporary hotspots. The course instructs on the international law, best practices, and rehabilitation models that currently address child soldiering. The course then questions current practices so as to improve them. This means that the course presents a critical eye that reveals important and tough questions about the agency of children and youth, the realities of girl soldiers, the prevalence of youth volunteerism, assumptions (often Westernized) of childhood and coming of age, how best to deter child soldiering, and how to develop robust frameworks of juvenile rights in cross-cultural contexts. The course concludes by examining the justice needs of child soldiers and of those – including other children -- who they may have harmed.

Contact Hours: 45

Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology

3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PS 101 | Open
Instructor: Merel Keijsers
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Introduces the study of psychology, the study of the human mind, in some of its many facets: epistemological issues, the brain, perception, learning, language, intelligence, motivation, development, personality, emotion, social influences, pathology and therapy, and prevention. These will be seen from the scientific and scholarly point of view, but with emphasis on their relevance to everyday life. An important focus of the course will be the significance of theories and how they influence the gathering of data, as well as the difficulty of objectivity when the object of study is also its primary tool: the human mind. One of the goals of the course will also be to prepare the student to read psychological literature with a critical eye, keeping in mind the difficulties involved in attempting to study human subjectivity in an objective way.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PS 320 | Open
Instructor: Paola Castelli
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: PS 101
The course provides a general introduction to the science of developmental psychology and its applications. A number of questions will be addressed, including: What develops and when; The contribution of nature and nurture to developmental change; Mechanisms of change; The role of the child and the larger sociocultural context in shaping development; Continuity and discontinuity in development; Methods used to address the above topics; Application of developmental research to everyday issues.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PS 339 | Open
Instructor: TBA
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: SOSC/ITS 220 | Open
Instructor: Valentina Dorato
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Italy's deep-rooted network of local food knowledge is an excellent example for students to understand what food culture is, how food scenarios changed with industrialization, and how they are evolving further today. This course presents students with the basic tools necessary for better understanding Italian food culture. Its broad perspective encompasses traditional farming and processing techniques, the industrial and global food economy and changing consumption habits. Its anthropological approach draws from classical and modern writing. Italy is world-famous for its produce diversity and vibrant peasant traditions. By exploring the complex set of influences forming the Italian food culture, students will acquire an analytical approach enabling them to read through the other "foodscapes" that they encounter in their home country or abroad, and eventually choose, value and embrace career paths into the food sector. Even apparently simple, everyday food staples contain layers of significance connecting to the following topics: the peculiar man-nature relationship needed for their production; preserving and cooking techniques; the influences from foreign cooking philosophies and/or crops; the pressure of the global market; and the type of socialization involved during the meal.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: SOSC/ITS 226 | Open
Instructor: Isabella Clough Marinaro
Monday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Wednesday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: SOSC/NS 260 | Open
Instructor: Kristen Emory
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Studio Art

3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: AS 105 | Open
Instructor: Valerio di Lucente
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
This course creates a foundation of knowledge of photographic history, theory, and practice, and is recommended as preparation for further study in photography. Students will encounter technical issues concerning both film and digital photography, including basic issues of camera functions and controls, darkroom procedures, and digital techniques and software. The course examines a broad range of subjects such as: the early history of photography, photographic genres, use of artificial and of natural light, and various modes of presentation and archival management. Shooting pictures is balanced with classroom work. The course will help students develop a formal and critical vocabulary, an understanding of the uses of photography, and inspiration for more advanced photo courses.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: AS 110 | Open
Instructor: Roberto Caracciolo
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note-taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light, and the development of volume in space.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: AS 299 | Open
Instructor: Roberto Caracciolo
Tuesday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Thursday 1:40 pm - 5:20 pm
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of studio arts. Courses are normally topics on an area of current artistic or technical concern led by a specialist in the field.
Contact Hours: 45

Courses & Schedule
Courses run Monday – Thursday, meeting 2 or 4 days per week. SAI students are free to enroll in any available course.

Course Registration
SAI students complete their course registration directly with JCU through their JCU student account. Students receive their student account login about 2 weeks before registration opens. JCU courses are competitive, and students should complete their course registration on the registration date. JCU course registration begins on the following date:

Summer I: April 19, 2022


Pre-Departure Calendar
March 3 2022
Application Closes
Applications accepted after closing as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
February 17 2022
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
March 19 2022
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
March 19 2022
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
April 19 2022
JCU Course Registration Opens
Registration opens at 3:30PM Pacific Time.

On-Site Calendar
Mary 18 2022
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students fly into Rome Fiumicino Airport (FCO). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 2:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
May 18 – 21 2022
SAI and JCU Orientation
Mandatory SAI and JCU orientations introduce students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
May 23 2022
JCU Classes Begin
May 25 2022
JCU Drop/Add Deadline
June 15 2022
Last day to Withdraw from a Class
June 24 2022
JCU Classes End & Final Exams
June 25 2022
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel. 
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $120
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 3 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$6,650
Program Fee: 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$8,100
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$450
International Mailing Supplement
When applicable, students are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$90

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Rome
$900 $1,800
Immigration Services
If applicable
$35 $35
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
$100 / course $200 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$650/ month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $350 / month
Transportation within Rome
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$125 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is a SAI 360° Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities and day trips
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • 20 meals at Tiber Cafe
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers all students the Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities, at no extra cost, for participants to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Day ExcursionEscape to the Roman Hills
SAI welcomes students with a day trip to Frascati in the beautiful Roman hills. Frascati played a pivotal role in history from the time of the Roman Empire to WWII and now offers a glimpse into small-town Italian life today. Students will tour the town and learn about its history, enjoy the views from a local vineyard, and share a meal ‘al fresco’ in the town square which offers breathtaking views of Rome from above.

Sun and Sports at Lake Bracciano
Students will escape the summer heat with a day of water sports and relaxation at Lake Bracciano. Students will have the chance to kayak and paddle-board, explore the quaint nearby fishing village, or simply soak up some rays along the black sand beach.

“La Luna sul Colosseo” – Colosseum Night Tour
“The Moon above the Colosseum” is one of the main attractions in Rome during the summer months. As day gives way to night and after the crowds have all gone home, SAI will take students to visit the Eternal City’s most important monument. Students will be guided through the history of this amazing amphitheater, exploring its most important areas, including the underground chambers and arena floor – both of which are usually closed to the public.

Farewell Event
Students celebrate the end of a successful term abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Italian meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing assignments are single gender; other housing configurations may be available under limited circumstances. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Please note: SAI housing is not related to John Cabot University housing; please do not fill out a housing application through JCU.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law U.S. students studying in Italy for 90 days or less are not required to obtain a student visa. Therefore all U.S. students do not require a student visa for this program. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.