John Cabot University
Summer 5 weeks II 2022
3 - 6 credits

With a location in the historic center of Rome, and an international student body, a summer at JCU is far more than the typical study abroad experience. SAI summer students at JCU can choose from more than 100 courses taught in English, including specialized courses in Engineering and Math. Students in JCU’s 5 week summer programs select 1 or 2 courses from the large offering for a total of 3 - 6 credits. SAI offers two Summer 5 week sessions at JCU, each with different start dates and course options: Summer I and Summer II.


Application: now open
Closes: April 15, 2022
Apps accepted on a rolling basis, and after closing as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Digital photo (passport style)
Italian privacy consent form
Supplemental JCU privacy consent form

Highlights

  • See our revised policies due to Coronavirus here.
  • Courses emphasize exposure to the city with on-site learning on location at museums and historic sites.
  • $500 scholarship for STEM students.

Program Dates
June 30, 2022 – August 6, 2022


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

*contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

English Language:* Non-native English language speakers must submit TOEFL: 85+ (internet based) or IELTS: 6.5+.



Art History and Archaeology
Business, Law, Management, and Marketing
Classical Studies
Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science
Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language
Economics and Finance
Engineering
Foreign Languages
History and Humanities
Philosophy and Religious Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology
Studio Art

Art History and Archaeology

3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 196 | Open
Instructor: Alexis Ruth Culotta
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 12:00 am
Pre-requisite: Mandatory trip to Florence (cost TBD)
A survey course covering the innovations of the Early Renaissance to the High Renaissance (14th into the 16th Century). The works of Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Ghiberti, Masaccio, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante and Raphael and others will be studied.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 223 | Open
Instructor: Aura Piccioni
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
A survey of Roman architecture and art (sculpture, wall painting, mosaics and crafts) produced in Italy and the Roman provinces between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD. The course addresses such themes as: changing styles and techniques, practical and symbolic function of art and architecture, what it meant to be Roman in a multicultural Empire, and the notions of commemoration, remembrance and nostalgia.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: AH 294 | Open
Instructor: Paul Tegmeyer
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Activity fee 25 euros or $33
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.
Contact Hours: 45

Business, Law, Management, and Marketing

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUS 220 | Open
Instructor: Kay Marie Losey
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in small business. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: ETH/BUS 301 | Open
Instructor: Rikki Sue Abzug
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: Junior standing
This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a "free market," the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of "ethical" consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Law | Course #: LAW 219 | Open
Instructor: Jessica Magaldi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This course provides the student with an overview of the law in general, beginning with the foundations of the legal and regulatory environment, the law making processes, and the implementation of the legal rules. Students examine some areas of substantive law, including bodies of law that are regulatory in nature. Particular attention is given to aspects of business transactions in an international context.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Management | Course #: MGT 301 | Open
Instructor: Ieva Jacobsone Bellomi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing
Introduction to the manager's role and the management process in the context of organizations and society. Focus on effective management of the corporation in a changing society and on improved decision making and communication. Processes covered: planning, organizing, coordinating and controlling. Teamwork and individual participation are emphasized.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 301 | Open
Instructor: Ian Roberts
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: EC 201, MA 208
This course will give students a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the strategic marketing planning process including: methods and tools of market assessment, customer segmentation analysis, development of the value proposition, positioning and planning of marketing tactics designed to deliver value to targeted stakeholders.

Emphasis is placed on the need to align marketing principles and theories with the management skills needed for the preparation of a marketing plan. Students will be able to analyze opportunities and threats in both the macro and micro-environments. Students will also conduct a marketing research gathering data for effective decision-making and will develop their ability to evaluate gaps.

In this course, students will begin to learn how to conduct a competitive analysis, analyze environmental trend, forecast changing market demand and develop competitive marketing strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Marketing | Course #: MKT 330 | Open
Instructor: Tetyana Kholod
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MKT 301
An investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Factors in assessing world marketing opportunities; international marketing of products, pricing, distribution and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems, and planning and organizing for export-import operations.
Contact Hours: 45

Classical Studies

3.0 Credits
Classical Studies | Course #: CL/HS 231 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
Contact Hours: 45

Communications, Media Studies, and Journalism

3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: CMS 280 | Open
Instructor: Effie Mari Quattrociocchi
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication, ”its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots, as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

* Global Leaders Certificate Program approved course *
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Communications | Course #: COM 101 | Open
Instructor: Daniel Connelly
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Journalism | Course #: CMS 330 | Open
Instructor: Nicholas Boston
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: COM 220
This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Media Studies | Course #: CMS/ITS 243 | Open
Instructor: Erika Tasini
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; "Americans" in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini's Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a "character" in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scene. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of "places and spaces" (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences

Contact Hours: 45

Computer Science, Mathematics, and Natural Science

3.0 Credits
Computer Science | Course #: CS 160 | Open
Instructor: Yohn Jairo Parra Bautista
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. The goal of this course is to advance students’ computational thinking, educate them to use programs as tools in their own field of study, and to provide them with fundamental knowledge of programming strategies.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 198 | Open
Instructor: Derek Wayne Hein
Monday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Tuesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Wednesday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Thursday 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 197 with a grade of C- or above
This course explores the fundamental topics of traditional Calculus such as limits, continuity, differentiation and anti-differentiation, with emphasis on the business and economics applications of maximization, minimization, optimization, and decision making.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Mathematics | Course #: MA 208 | Open
Instructor: Carlos Theran Suarez
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: Placement into MA 197 or completion of MA 100 or MA 101 with a grade of C- or above
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; hypothesis testing, and an introduction to simple linear regression.
Contact Hours: 45

Creative Writing, English Composition, Literature, and Language

3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: CW 356 | Open
Instructor: Nefeli Misuraca
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: EN 110
This interdisciplinary writing workshop employs the city of Rome as its muse and offers instruction in several genres of creative writing. By examining a variety of works inspired by the Eternal City, students will learn how to evaluate literature in light of an aesthetic and historic precedent, as well as participate in the long tradition of international writers who have recreated Rome on the page. The course will also problematize Rome, exploring the ancient city s contemporary contradictions and complexities and the way writers both perpetuate and dismantle certain myths, such as the illusory La Dolce Vita. Writing workshops will acquaint students with the techniques and tools used to critique and incorporate critical feedback into their own revision process. Through studied writing practice and the examination of the Roman setting as a vital literary component, students will generate a final portfolio of textual interpretations in response to the Eternal City.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Composition | Course #: EN 110 | Open
Instructor: James Teasdale
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: Completion of EN 103 with a grade of C or above OR completion of EN 105 with a grade of C or above
This course reinforces the skills needed to write well-organized essays, focusing specifically on argumentative essays. Elements covered include thesis development, critical reading, organizing and outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and citation and documentation standards. Techniques of academic research and the use of the library and other research facilities are discussed. In addition to regular in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments, students are required to write a fully documented research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to fulfill the University English Composition requirement and to be eligible to take courses in English literature. Individual students in EN 110 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
English Literature | Course #: EN 340 | Open
Instructor: Daniel Connelly
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
This study of European drama begins with major realists and naturalists such as Chekhov and Ibsen alongside the experimental innovations of Strindberg and Brecht. The modern theater of, among others, Beckett, Ionesco, Pinter, Osborne, Churchill, Kane and Butterworth are analyzed with special emphasis on plot, theme, character, structure and technique. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
Contact Hours: 45

Economics and Finance

3.0 Credits
Economics | Course #: EC 201 | Open
Instructor: Lauren Chamberlain
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 101 or MA 102 Recommended: EN 105
This course introduces the students to the basic principles of microeconomics and the study of the behavior of individual agents, such as consumers and producers. The first part of the course reviews the determinants of supply and demand, the characteristics of market equilibrium, the concept of social welfare, and the consequences of price controls, taxation, and externalities on social welfare. The second part of the course deals with market theory, with a review of cost concepts and market structures: competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition.
Contact Hours: 45

Engineering

3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 211 | Open
Instructor: John Pfaff Borg
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Pre-requisite: ENGR 210
The course provides a study of the fundamentals of solid mechanics of deformable bodies. The engineering structures covered in this course are determinate and indeterminate assemblies of tension members, columns (including buckling), beams (flexural members), shafts (torsional members), and thin-walled pressure vessels (tanks). The course also contains an introduction to common categories and types of engineering materials and their failure mechanisms. The importance of safety factors and their application in the Allowable Stress Design philosophy is emphasized throughout the course, leading to an enhanced awareness of the professional and ethical responsibilities inherent to the role of the engineer.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 220 | Open
Instructor: Gregory Maxwell
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite: MA 299
This course covers theory and application of fluid statics, momentum transfer, and viscous fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work covers both open-channel and conduit (pipe) flow. The fluid statics and dynamics of incompressible and compressible fluids are considered.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Engineering | Course #: ENGR 240 | Open
Instructor: Jon-Michael Hardin
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Foreign Languages

3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 101 | Open
Instructor: Bruno Montefusco
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Pre-requisite:
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT 102 | Open
Instructor: Bruno Montefusco
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Pre-requisite: Placement or IT 101
A continuation of IT 101, this course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Latin Language | Course #: LAT 101 | Open
Instructor: Thomas Govero
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Introduction to Latin syntax, vocabulary, and simple sentence structures. This first-semester course will complete all the first three declensions of nouns, present, imperfect, future and perfect verb tenses, subject, object and possessive pronouns. Study of cognate words in Latin/English will be a frequent subject of study. The course will also examine the Roman cultural context such as history, daily life, religion mythology and politics. Students will translate sentences for practice from English to Latin and vice versa on a daily basis. There will be an introduction to continuous prose passages from the original authors or adapted for study to be translated throughout the course.
Contact Hours: 45

History and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Humanistic Studies | Course #: ANTHR/PL 299 | Open
Instructor: Eduardo Zachary Albrecht
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45

Philosophy and Religious Studies

3.0 Credits
Philosophy | Course #: PH 210 | Open
Instructor: Kristopher Gordon Phillips
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
The philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome debated fundamental questions with an imagination, subtlety, and daring that have captured the attention of thoughtful people in every epoch. For example, they considered the nature and origin of the universe, what changes and does not change, as well as what causes change, how perception and reasoning produce knowledge, the relation between the soul and the body, the meaning of justice and beauty, and the nature of the good life. Through a careful reading of selected texts – in the form of dialogues, poems, aphorisms, or treatises – the course will introduce you to the great questions and controversies of ancient philosophy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Religious Studies | Course #: RL 221 | Open
Instructor: Michael Pettinger
Monday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Wednesday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Thursday 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm
The history of the Catholic church is essentially intertwined with the history of Western Civilization over the past 2,000 years. The aspirations and struggles of Christendom constitute the fabric of the Christian tradition as it unfolds throughout time. This course represents an historical survey of the Church from its primitive beginnings in Jerusalem (c. 33 A.D.) to the Pontificate of John Paul II (1920-2005). The development of the course will trace the major events, ideas and people that went into the shaping of the Western Church, without ignoring the fundamental importance and influence of the doctrine of Jesus Christ regarding the institution he founded.
Contact Hours: 45

Political Science

3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 210 | Open
Instructor: Karl Friedrich Walling
Monday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Tuesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Wednesday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
Thursday 9:00 am - 10:50 am
An introduction to the major political theorists, from the classical to the modern era, who devoted themselves to the task of analyzing the social order. Their theories also provide the foundation for the formation of the modern nation state. Among the theorists examined will be Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, and Marx.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Political Science | Course #: PL 359 | Open
Instructor: Farian Sabahi
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
This course will examine the history and the domestic and the foreign politics of modern Iran, highlighting its strategic role in the Middle East. It will analyse the institutional structure of the Islamic Republic, emphasizing how this political system can be classified as peculiar hybrid regime, and the role of Iranian civil society, particularly the youth and the women. Through critical analysis of the core texts and common explanatory theories (modernization theory, hybrid regimes theory, neoclassical realist theory), the course aims to examine Iran both before and after the 1979 Revolution to provide students with a multidisciplinary international relations perspective and a domestic political science approach.
Contact Hours: 45

Social Sciences: Sociology and Psychology

3.0 Credits
Psychology | Course #: PS 312 | Open
Instructor: Maria Kozhevnikov
Monday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Thursday 3:40 pm - 5:30 pm
Pre-requisite: PS 210 (PS 307 recommended)
Coming soon
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: SOSC/ITS 226 | Open
Instructor: Simone Poliandri
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Sociology | Course #: SOSC/NS 265 | Open
Instructor: Kristen Emory
Monday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Tuesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Wednesday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
Thursday 11:10 am - 1:00 pm
The right to health and wellness is a universal human right; yet global inequalities mean that there are still vast differences in people’s enjoyment of health and access to services. In this course we will see how modern health is not limited to physical or mental states, but encompasses all areas of our lives and communities. We take an ecological perspective to better understand health and predictors of health and wellness across the intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community, and policy/systemic levels. This course explores some of the key social, economic, cultural and political determinants of health and its disparities. It examines the role of maternal and children’s health, patterns in physical (in)activity around the world, young adults’ health, mental health and the impacts of substance use. It then discusses in depth the development and management of pandemics and the factors that affect different contagion and survival rates globally. The intertwinement of health and geopolitics is also investigated in relation to migration and health at borders, issues of social justice more broadly, and the right to food security. Students then analyze the cultural dimensions of food and its relationship to health, as well as the environmental variables that determine people’s access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene.
Contact Hours: 45

Studio Art

3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: AS 110 | Open
Instructor: Catherine Biocca
Tuesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Thursday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note-taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light, and the development of volume in space.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: AS 289 | Open
Instructor: Paola Soriani
Monday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Wednesday 9:00 am - 12:45 pm
Pre-requisite: Cameras need functions selector M,A,S,P; a tripod is recommended. Laptop with photoshop software
The main objective of the course is to prepare students to learn the use of the NEW CAMERAS, their settings, and the new perspectives in photography given by the use of specific SOFTWARE. The students will be able to create their own Portfolio, including eight/ten photos, and a one written page explanation of their work. In this part of the course the teacher and the fellow classmates following two criteria will critique the works: Techniques and Creativity. The best pictures of all students will be presented with a multimedia slide show during the final exhibition of classes.
Pre-requisite for the course: each participant must have his/her own digital camera with a wide lens or an optical zoom 3x or more and/or 35mm TTL camera with 28/80mm lens zoom or equivalents.
Contact Hours: 45

Courses & Schedule
Courses run Monday – Thursday, meeting 2 or 4 days per week. SAI students are free to enroll in any available course.

Course Registration
SAI students complete their course registration directly with JCU through their JCU student account. Students receive their student account login about 2 weeks before registration opens. JCU courses are competitive, and students should complete their course registration on the registration date. JCU course registration begins on the following date:

Summer II: May 18, 2022


Pre-Departure Calendar
April 15, 2022
Application Closes
Applications accepted after closing as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
April 1 2022
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the deposit payment date.
May 1 2022
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until financial aid disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
May 2 2022
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
May 18 2022
JCU Course Registration Opens
Registration opens at 3:30PM Pacific Time

On-Site Calendar
June 30 2022
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students fly into Rome Fiumicino Airport (FCO). SAI airport pickup is provided between 9:00am and 2:00pm, and students are transferred to SAI housing.
June 30 – July 3 2022
SAI and JCU Orientation
Mandatory SAI and JCU orientations introduce students to their city while covering safety, policies, housing, and culture.
July 5 2022
JCU Classes Begin
July 7 2022
Last Day to Add/Drop Courses
July 27 2022
Last day to Withdraw from a Class
August 5 2022
JCU Classes End & Final Exams
August 6 2022
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of SAI housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $120
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 3 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$6,650
Program Fee: 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI 360° Services (see What’s Included).
$8,100
Optional / Additional Fees:  
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in a shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$450
International Mailing Supplement
When applicable, students are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$90

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Rome
$900 $1,800
Immigration Services
If applicable
$35 $35
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
$100 / course $200 / course
Meals
Includes groceries and eating out.
$650/ month $800 / month
Personal Expenses $300 / month $350 / month
Transportation within Rome
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$125 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI 360° Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Welcome reception and events
  • SAI orientation to the host city and school
  • SAI staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • SAI Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities and day trips
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Access to and assistance with international cell phone plans
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support
  • 20 meals at Tiber Cafe
  • Farewell event with all students

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • US-based admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid processing
  • Need-based SAI scholarships
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers all students the Viva Experience: frequent cultural activities, at no extra cost, for participants to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Day ActivityA Taste of Rome Food Tour
Part walking tour, part introduction to Roman food culture, students get to know their new home by exploring the Trastevere neighborhood and tasting some of Rome’s most celebrated culinary traditions.

Gelato Workshop
Students learn to make gelato with a professional Roman Gelataio (Italian for gelato maker). The workshop provides an inside look at one of the yummiest Italian traditions.

Opera Under the Stars
The marvelous archaeological site of the Roman Baths, the Terme di Caracalla, serves as an absolutely unique theatrical stage. A showing of one of Italy’s classic Operas performed in this atmospheric open-air theater is an experience not to be missed.

Farewell Event
Students celebrate the end of a successful term abroad and say their goodbyes over a delicious Italian meal.

Standard Housing: Student apartment
SAI student apartments are convenient and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (option to upgrade to private bedroom, if available). Typical residences house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. All apartments are equipped with wireless Internet. Housing assignments are single gender; other housing configurations may be available under limited circumstances. SAI on-site staff is available to respond to any maintenance needs that may arise.

Please note: SAI housing is not related to John Cabot University housing; please do not fill out a housing application through JCU.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law U.S. students studying in Italy for 90 days or less are not required to obtain a student visa. Therefore all U.S. students do not require a student visa for this program. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.