Siena Italian Studies
Fall Semester Language/ Elective 2017
15 – 18 credits

Semester students can go from absolute beginner Italian speakers to advanced, all while taking language and subject coursework. During the first weeks of semester courses, lessons are conducted in a mix of English and Italian and students are given English language readings and supporting materials to ensure that the content is not compromised. As students’ linguistic competencies improve, more and more Italian is used and by the end, not only are lessons held in Italian, but also final papers are written in Italian. The program is a combination of 9 credits of language courses and 6 – 9 credits of electives.


Application Deadline
June 15, 2017
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Academic letter of recommendation
Passport scan (photo page)
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Complete multiple levels of Italian language in a single semester
  • Volunteer within the community each week
  • Weekly cultural activities & events

Program Dates
September 3, 2017 – December 18, 2017


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18

Academic Year: Freshman (1st year) or above

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements



Business Studies
Graduate Courses
Humanities & Social Sciences
Internship
Italian Language
Literature & Linguistics
Music & Visual Arts
Sciences

Business Studies

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BU BL 300 | Open
This course is designed for students who are interested business and legislative Italian language and aims to provide students with the basic vocabulary and professional expressions that are most often used in Italian business and legal interactions. After identifying the basic technical vocabulary and expressions, the student is helped to assimilate them through targeted exercises and discussions. Throughout the course, students will also discuss various aspects of the business and legislative structures in Italy as well as visit various local offices and conduct interviews with relevant figures.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BU FE 300 | Open
The course aims to show the student a more ethical and solidarity-based "use" of finance, which today no longer corresponds to the "moral" sense of market economy but is too often seen in the speculative sense instead of a motor of real economy. Through a general historic overview on the birth of economy and finance, tracing the foundations and the main objectives of banks (the bank of Monte dei Paschi di Siena, for example, was one of the first banks ever founded), we'll arrive at studying the corrective measures that can be taken to counter-act credit aberrations through visits to and lessons on "ethical" structures that have the specific objective to assist, finance and support the people and the ideas for which profit is not the only goal of market economy.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BU IB 400 | Open
The general part of the course is concentrated on the issues related to the globalization and its development over human history, and how the concept of time and space have been changing through the centuries our economic perception of Goods Capital and People. Without such a radical change (either cultural or technological) the Market Economy network would not reach such a global extension. Besides the relationship between cyberspace and virtual economy will be explored, the peculiarity between the Internet and the global financialization of stock market will be analyzed.


The special part of the course is devoted to the European integration, with a strong focus on economic and business developments. The European Union with almost 500 million citizens faces serious challenges in its role as a major player in the global economy. After a brief historical overview, students will be introduced to several core issues on European institutional asset, economic politics, and decision-making processes.

Contact Hours: 45

Graduate Courses

3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ENG 510 | Open
Pre-requisite: Upper-Intermediate to Advanced Italian language level. Course is taught in Italian.
After briefly sketching a panorama of Italian immigration to the United States, this course will examine the writings of two second-generation Italian authors: Robert Viscusi and Maria Mazziotti Gillan. Both authors reflect the hostile relationship that many immigrants' children had with their own origins. These were often perceived as an obstacle and, therefore, veiled in silence in order to facilitate the 'melting pot' concept. The difficult rediscovery of the Italian language and culture by the two authors- after a long phase of silence, at times imposed, at times desired- and their type of 'psychoanalytical' work that discusses the turbulent road in search of roots, act as witness to the dilemma that has characterized the second generation in search for their own identity. Students will complete a midterm and final exam, as well as complete a final term paper on a topic determined jointly by the student and professor.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ENG 541 | Open
Pre-requisite: Upper-Intermediate to Advanced Italian language level. Course is taught in Italian.
The course focuses on the principal authors of Italian literature from the 15th to the 19th centuries. These authors include Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galilei, Foscolo, Goldoni, Manzoni and Leopardi. During the course the professor will offer a general overview of the history of Italian literature, exploring the mail cultural movements of these periods from Humanism and the Counter Reformation to the Enlightenment, Neoclassicim and Romanticism and the Restoration and the Resurgence. Particular focus will be dedicated to the contribution and influence by the authors in the context of their respective eras. Students will read, analyze and discuss a series of texts and excerpts during the course and will complete oral presentations, a midterm and final exam, and a final term paper.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Language | Course #: LING 510 | Open
Pre-requisite: Upper-Intermediate to Advanced Italian language level. Course is taught in Italian.
The course will present the principle varieties of the Italian language that emigrated together with the millions of Italian citizens who left Italy to find opportunity in the various nations of the Americas. It will begin with a historical-social reflection on emigration and then it will focus on the languages that were developed in Latin America and in the United States from contact between the Italian emigrants and the local languages (in particular English, Spanish, Portuguese). The cultural and linguistic identity of the emigrants resurfaces through these "mixed" idioms that present very different histories and outcomes. The emigrants languages will be presented from the historical and sociolinguistic point of view; concrete examples of these languages will be given in different types of texts (poems, songs, proverbs), and we will analyze the relationship that that developed between the Italian dialects that left Italy and the languages of their destination countries. During the course, students will complete a midterm exam, an oral presentation and complete a final research paper on a topic determined jointly by the professor and students.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Language | Course #: LING 510 A | Open
Pre-requisite: Upper-Intermediate to Advanced Italian language level. Course is taught in Italian.
Siena Italian Studies’ Programs promote training courses that focus on the formation of cultural and linguistic competencies necessary to those embarking upon on a study abroad course. The course, articulated in theoretical lessons and practical lessons, requires in-class attendance, with the exception of the last portion that can also be taken online. The FICCS (Full Immersion: Culture, Content and Service) Method is unique to SIS and utilizes the unparalleled value of the combination of spontaneous and guided acquisition in language study abroad. The course will outline all components of the FICCS students’ experience as well as discuss the development and consolidation of Reflective Intercultural Competence, knowledge and expansion of teaching strategies and encourage the development of reflective didactic strategies, including a reflective didactic journal.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Language | Course #: LING 538 | Open
Pre-requisite: Upper-Intermediate to Advanced Italian language level. Course is taught in Italian.
This course is intended for graduate level students who seek to deepen various themes relative to Italian instruction as L2, as well as the acquisition of Italian as L2. The course will be sub-divided into two parts. Part one will be theoretical and part two will be dedicated to more practical methods of Glottodidactics, including observation of lessons and the creation and elaboration of didactic projects. In addition, the Common European Reference for Languages will be analyzed, a brief overview of the History of Italian Language will be presented and the sociolinguistic situation of contemporary Italian language in Italy. Students will complete all parts of the course, actively participating with projects and homework to be presented and discussed during each lesson. Students will be required to read various texts in the reference bibliography and some additional materials provided by the instructor. During the course students will complete a theoretical exam that relates to the first part of the course. Participants will also be expected to create project work appropriate for the classes observed. At the conclusion of the course they must complete a didactic unit that reflects the various theoretical and practical considerations that emerged during the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Humanities & Social Sciences

3.0 Credits
Anthropology | Course #: HS CA 300 | Open
This course introduces students to the panorama of Italian culture through the study of its traditions, rites, celebrations and beliefs, which form the basis of the historical and social evolution of Italian identity. Students first become familiar with methodological and conceptual instruments and then apply them to the specific situation of Tuscany and Siena in particular. By looking at celebrations and manifestations including the famous Palio we can observe social, public, secular and religious orders present in cultural legends and traditions that contribute to the formation of the Sienese identity. We also examine perceptions of identity in relationship to foreigners and tourists and the interactions of 'outside' cultures with the city of Siena. Visits and excursions are an integral part of the course and include: the contradas and contrada museums of Siena, the Bottini (underground water system), the Museo della Mezzadria (museum dedicated to peasant life and the local share-cropping system) and typical celebrations linked to the grape harvest and winemaking, and other seasonal harvests.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: HS AR 300 | Open
This course is dedicated to exploring the history of Costume in Italy over the centuries, with examples from major works of art from the classical Roman world to the Medieval and Renaissance eras, arriving to the Futurist oddities of the Twentieth century, bringing together art, history, culture and fashion. Museum and gallery visits will be an integral part of the course. Students will observe these trends in paintings and frescoes in museums such as the Museo Civico and Pinacoteca in Siena and the Uffizi Gallery, as well as a visit to the Galleria del Costume in Florence.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: HS AR 305 | Open
This course offers students a journey through the rich pageant of Medieval and Renaissance art and culture. The student will be given important resources with which to understand and appreciate more fully the works of art produced in central Italy from the mid-13th to the mid-15th centuries. We will look closely at the way in which changing styles in art reflected contemporary history and cultural attitudes. With power point presentations and visits to museums, churches and other places of historical or artistic interest in and around Siena and Florence, this course offers the students every opportunity to place their studies from the classroom in context and to see original works by the great masters.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: HS MA 300 | Open
This course explores Medieval art and culture, offering students the critical tools with which to analyze, understand and appreciate more fully the works of art produced in Western Europe from the Fall of the Roman Empire (V century) to the Birth of the Renaissance (XV century). We will explore the development of Medieval Art form Early Christian Art, to Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic Art; Architecture, Sculpture and Painting will be examined, by considering them in their proper historical and cultural context. We will look closely at the way in which changing styles in art reflected contemporary history and cultural attitudes. With power point presentations and also visits to museums, churches and other places of historical or artistic interest in and around Siena and Florence, this course give the students every opportunity to place their studies from the classroom in context and to see works by the great masters in the original.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian History | Course #: HS CI 300 | Open
On March 17, 1861 the Italian Parliament convened for the first time. That date, symbolic of Italy’s unification, could also be taken as the beginning of the long process which ended in the creation of a government and a nation. Through the analysis of the most significant periods of Nineteenth and Twentieth century Italian history (the Unification, Birth of the Sovereignty, the Great War, Fascism, the Second World War, the Resistance, the Constitution of the Republic, and ultimately, the creation of the European Union), we will trace the profound social, political, and economic transformations that changed the face of the population and its sense of national identity through over 150 years of history.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian History | Course #: HS EA 300 | Open
The history of Italian emigration speaks of the 26 million Italians that left their country in various periods between 1861 and 1975. The legacy of moral and civil values that these Italians brought with them greatly contributed to the development of their adopted countries around the world. Latin America was the first destination of emigrants outside of Europe, while North America was the recipient of the highest numbers of emigrants during the second wave of emigration.


Over time, communities of Italian origin integrated themselves into the social fabric of the Americas until they became an essential and lively part, not only of the culture and economy, but also of the political realities of these countries. Numerous Italian immigrants became noteworthy figures in politics, such as members of parliament and presidents, while others distinguished themselves in the arts, sciences and professional sports of their new countries.


This course has the objective of reconstructing historic, socioeconomic, and political premises from which Italian emigration resulted in the Americas while identifying geographic areas of emigration and following the integration process of Italians in these areas. The course will have a bilateral approach: it will examine both the impact of Italian culture on the Americas and the influence that the American continent, with its millions of immigrants, has had and continues to have on Italian reality today.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian History | Course #: HS HC 200 | Open
This course is meant to trace the history of Italian cooking from the Etruscan era to today through the description of recipes, recipe books, ingredients, changes in taste and different ways of eating, over the various centuries. Particular emphasis is given to the historical and linguistic dimensions of our peninsula’s resources, to the regional variations of the so-called “Italian” cooking and to the history and the characteristics of Tuscan cooking in particular; some observations will concern the anthropological and symbolic aspects of food and of eating as part of a community. Classes are organized in an interactive way: students are continuously asked to read and discuss, reflect and taste.


The course includes an integral out-of-class element. Students are required to participate in excursions that involve visits and tastings at cheese, ham and olive oil producing farms as well as wineries in Tuscany, visits to museums such as the Chocolate Museum in Perugia and the Museo della Mezzadria agricultural museum. In addition, students will participate in two hands-on cooking lessons. Readings for this course include historic, contemporary and regional cookbooks, as well as historical and sociological texts and articles. Students are asked to complete written exams and oral presentations as well as a research paper that focuses on a topic of choice.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian History | Course #: HS HM 300 | Open
This course aims to present the main historical events that defined Italian history from the fall of the Western Roman Empire (476 BC) to the Peace of Lodi (1454) that, for Italy, signified the transformation from the Medieval Period to the Modern Period.


The syllabus outlines the study of the historic events linked to the political, religious and social contexts of the ever-changing Italian reality without ignoring the essential European panorama in which Italy is located. Additionally, more specific themes will also be explored that will offer more cultural context to the historical chronology of facts. There will also be several excursions to relevant points of interest during the course.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian History | Course #: HS RC 300 | Open
The objective of this course is to contribute to the students cultural foundation while encouraging them to reflect upon the contribution that Christianity, as a phenomenon, has given to the cultural development of Italy. In order to allow for a clear comprehension of how the events of Christianity have affected the cultural aspects of Italian history, we will accompany the student on a brief but complete voyage through the centuries until today, with the influence of religion from an art historical point of view (religious iconography like the Biblia pauperum), a literary point of view (a synthetic profile of Italian ‘Christian’ literature), as well as a popular point of view (the sacred element that ancient festivals and local traditions held until modern secularization).
Contact Hours: 45

Internship

3.0 Credits
Internship | Course #: IN IN 300 | Open
Students may select an internship from the program offerings. Internships are listed under "Services", then "Internship Opportunities". Students will sign up for their preferred internship during the first week of the program.

PLEASE NOTE: Internships are normally non-credit, unless prior arrangements are be made with your home university. Contact admissions for more information on how to receive credits
Contact Hours: 45

Italian Language

6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT SM 150 | Open
Following the Three Week Intensive Italian Course, students are placed in the appropriate level and continue to study Italian language 2 hours a day, 4 days a week for the duration of the semester. Classes include a variety activities linked to experiences in the city, student presentations, discussions, videos, quizzes, and writing assignments, as well as the study of specific aspects of Italian grammar. The intermediate and advanced levels provide a complete study of grammatical and communicative structures using materials that are varied in both content and type.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT SM 200 | Open
Following the Three Week Intensive Italian Course, students are placed in the appropriate level and continue to study Italian language 2 hours a day, 4 days a week for the duration of the semester. Classes include a variety activities linked to experiences in the city, student presentations, discussions, videos, quizzes, and writing assignments, as well as the study of specific aspects of Italian grammar. The intermediate and advanced levels provide a complete study of grammatical and communicative structures using materials that are varied in both content and type.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT SM 250 | Open
Following the Three Week Intensive Italian Course, students are placed in the appropriate level and continue to study Italian language 2 hours a day, 4 days a week for the duration of the semester. Classes include a variety activities linked to experiences in the city, student presentations, discussions, videos, quizzes, and writing assignments, as well as the study of specific aspects of Italian grammar. The intermediate and advanced levels provide a complete study of grammatical and communicative structures using materials that are varied in both content and type.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT SM 300 | Open
Following the Three Week Intensive Italian Course, students are placed in the appropriate level and continue to study Italian language 2 hours a day, 4 days a week for the duration of the semester. Classes include a variety activities linked to experiences in the city, student presentations, discussions, videos, quizzes, and writing assignments, as well as the study of specific aspects of Italian grammar. The intermediate and advanced levels provide a complete study of grammatical and communicative structures using materials that are varied in both content and type.
Contact Hours: 90
6.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: IT SM 350 | Open
Following the Three Week Intensive Italian Course, students are placed in the appropriate level and continue to study Italian language 2 hours a day, 4 days a week for the duration of the semester. Classes include a variety activities linked to experiences in the city, student presentations, discussions, videos, quizzes, and writing assignments, as well as the study of specific aspects of Italian grammar. The intermediate and advanced levels provide a complete study of grammatical and communicative structures using materials that are varied in both content and type.
Contact Hours: 90
3.0 Credits
Italian Language Intensive | Course #: IT IN 150 | Open
All students, whether beginners, intermediate or advanced, begin their Siena Italian Studies experience with our Three Week Intensive Italian Language Course. After an entrance exam, students are placed in appropriate levels and participate every day in classes and activities designed to develop all linguistic abilities, from the basic (listening, reading, writing, speaking) to the integrated (responding to questions, note-taking, transcodification).

A wide variety of teaching materials is used, including the Program's own textbook, Dimmi Tutto!, to allow each student to best identify and develop his or her abilities. Students also interact with the city environment and help to create their own Italian language study materials. Once a week, students and teachers discuss the dynamics of language learning and the teaching methods used.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language Intensive | Course #: IT IN 200 | Open
All students, whether beginners, intermediate or advanced, begin their Siena Italian Studies experience with our Three Week Intensive Italian Language Course. After an entrance exam, students are placed in appropriate levels and participate every day in classes and activities designed to develop all linguistic abilities, from the basic (listening, reading, writing, speaking) to the integrated (responding to questions, note-taking, transcodification).

A wide variety of teaching materials is used, including the Program's own textbook, Dimmi Tutto!, to allow each student to best identify and develop his or her abilities. Students also interact with the city environment and help to create their own Italian language study materials. Once a week, students and teachers discuss the dynamics of language learning and the teaching methods used.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language Intensive | Course #: IT IN 250 | Open
All students, whether beginners, intermediate or advanced, begin their Siena Italian Studies experience with our Three Week Intensive Italian Language Course. After an entrance exam, students are placed in appropriate levels and participate every day in classes and activities designed to develop all linguistic abilities, from the basic (listening, reading, writing, speaking) to the integrated (responding to questions, note-taking, transcodification).

A wide variety of teaching materials is used, including the Program's own textbook, Dimmi Tutto!, to allow each student to best identify and develop his or her abilities. Students also interact with the city environment and help to create their own Italian language study materials. Once a week, students and teachers discuss the dynamics of language learning and the teaching methods used.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language Intensive | Course #: IT IN 300 | Open
All students, whether beginners, intermediate or advanced, begin their Siena Italian Studies experience with our Three Week Intensive Italian Language Course. After an entrance exam, students are placed in appropriate levels and participate every day in classes and activities designed to develop all linguistic abilities, from the basic (listening, reading, writing, speaking) to the integrated (responding to questions, note-taking, transcodification).

A wide variety of teaching materials is used, including the Program's own textbook, Dimmi Tutto!, to allow each student to best identify and develop his or her abilities. Students also interact with the city environment and help to create their own Italian language study materials. Once a week, students and teachers discuss the dynamics of language learning and the teaching methods used.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language Intensive | Course #: IT IN 350 | Open
All students, whether beginners, intermediate or advanced, begin their Siena Italian Studies experience with our Three Week Intensive Italian Language Course. After an entrance exam, students are placed in appropriate levels and participate every day in classes and activities designed to develop all linguistic abilities, from the basic (listening, reading, writing, speaking) to the integrated (responding to questions, note-taking, transcodification).

A wide variety of teaching materials is used, including the Program's own textbook, Dimmi Tutto!, to allow each student to best identify and develop his or her abilities. Students also interact with the city environment and help to create their own Italian language study materials. Once a week, students and teachers discuss the dynamics of language learning and the teaching methods used.
Contact Hours: 45

Literature & Linguistics

3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: IL CL 200 | Open
This course will analyze some of the fundamental themes present in Italian literature during the contemporary period: love, political consciousness, the search for freedom and the creation of an identity. The themes will be presented through the reading of various passages from such authors as: Ungaretti, Montale, Saba and Luzi and short stories from authors such including Ginzburg and Moravia. Students will learn how the works are constructed and how language has evolved by comparing one author to another and discussing the themes presented.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: IL MA 200 | Open
The course will analyze a theme that has been a foundation of Italian literature from the medieval period to the contemporary one: the love story, with the woman often considered as an angel and inspirational muse. This theme will be presented through the reading of some of the most poetic works, from Dante to Saba, and from Petrarch to Montale. This reflection will also be accompanied by the study of some pieces by modern and contemporary authors on the existential crises of the modern man, from Pirandello to Calvino, from Svevo to Tabucchi.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Linguistics | Course #: SO IS 300 | Open
After a brief study of the formation of Italian as a national language, this course will analyze the movements, changes and the many dramatic transformations that came about in the language during the course of the Twentieth century. We look at and compare geographical variations (Standard Italian, dialects, regionalisms, ethno-linguistic minorities, Italian outside Italy and the Italian spoken by immigrants in Italy), as well as variations within society (popular vs. cultured Italian, jargon/slang, juvenile language, gender-specific Italian, specialized language), context-based variations (registers, functional/contextual variations) and variations found in different forms of the language (written, spoken and transmitted language).
Students participate in fieldwork projects based on their areas of interest.
Contact Hours: 45
1.0 Credits
Reflective Writing | Course #: RW SL 150 | Open
All SIS students participate in this course. Meeting one hour a week, Reflective Writing allows and encourages students to reflect upon all aspects of their experience abroad and, in particular, link observations from their community service work, interactions with host families and language exchange partners to in-class projects and papers. Students will be invited to document their observations and reflections made during the week in their journals and then discuss them in this informal setting with the instructor and their fellow students. This is an essential opportunity to process and make sense of students’ varied experiences during the semester.
The goal is to develop a reflective consciousness that is the path for the development of intercultural competence. In Reflective Writing sessions students are at the center of the acquisition process. Knowledge is built through the constant sharing and discussion of the entries with peers. The teacher’s role will be to guide and supervise the sharing of the entries. The teacher will also have to identify appropriate input at the right time in an effort to constantly make the discussion relevant and pertinent to what is taught/learned in the Institutions in Society course.
Contact Hours: 15

Music & Visual Arts

3.0 Credits
Cinema | Course #: MA IC 200 | Open
This course focuses on the most important Italian cinematic movement, Neo-realism, and includes discussion of the practical aspects of filmmaking. In the first part of the course, we watch and discuss the principle neo-realist films, presenting the historical period and overviews of each director’s production while analyzing structure, storyline, protagonists, etc.


The second part concentrates on the masterpieces of one of the great Italian directors, Luchino Visconti. After learning about the main characteristics of his work and comparing him to other important Italian directors like Fellini and Antonioni, we analyze, compare and contrast his most significant films. During the course, we will discuss themes relating to the planning and realization of films, including screenwriting, acting and cinematography. In addition, students may participate in seminars offered by Italian directors currently working in the film industry in Rome.


Students are asked to write two short papers during the course. Films are shown in Italian and accompanied by the instructor’s explanations.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Music | Course #: MA FM 300 | Open
The course analyzes the modern and contemporary history of this country through its music (melodies, voices, lyrics, traditional dances, socio-historical and political context). Original songs coming from different areas of Italy will be first analyzed from a linguistic point of view; then they will be contextualised into the socio-political framework that generated them.


**Please Note this course is currently awaiting approval from PSU.**

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Music | Course #: MA MP 300 | Open
With music at its core, this course examines the economic, cultural, and artistic mechanisms that brought on Renaissance culture in Tuscany, and on the rhetoric of power and politics in the economy and in the arts, both then and today. We will make comparisons between the financial climate of the Renaissance and Baroque eras on the one hand, and the economic crisis of our time on the other. We will look at how painting, literature, and music were affected by the economic climate hundreds of year ago, and how the same economic forces may be shaping the artistic climate in modern times.


** Portland State University approval will be complete by mid June 2011.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: MA DP 300 | Open
This course aims to stimulate the personal creativity of each student, allowing them to express themselves through their artistic notions. During the semester, students will develop aesthetic sensibility through their interpretations of contemporary Tuscan society, and of Sienese society in particular. The student will also be made familiar with local artistic culture through visits and guest lectures featuring local artisans. Students will work with various artistic materials and in various genres in the creation of a series of projects that will then be displayed at the conclusion of the semester. The course is designed to inspire admiration for originality or contemporary works, as well as the value of historical works in their respective contexts.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Studio Art | Course #: MA ST 200 | Open
This course aims to stimulate the personal creativity of each student, allowing them to express themselves through their artistic notions. During the semester, students will develop aesthetic sensibility through their interpretations of contemporary Tuscan society, and of Sienese society in particular. The student will also be made familiar with local artistic culture through visits and guest lectures featuring local artisans. Students will work with various artistic materials and in various genres in the creation of a series of projects that will then be displayed at the conclusion of the semester. The course is designed to inspire admiration for originality or contemporary works, as well as the value of historical works in their respective contexts.
Contact Hours: 45

Sciences

4.0 Credits
Biology | Course #: SC CB 300 | Open
This course is principally designed for undergraduate students studying Italian as a foreign language that have an interest in Cell Biology. A background in Biology is desirable although the syllabus targets individuals with little or no knowledge of the subject. The course is focused on basic aspects of Cell Biology ranging from a study of cell structure, function and molecular organization, while learning about the tradition of science and the school of medicine in Siena and its relevance in the social background of this ancient city.

As part of the program will explore basic aspects of Plant Biology, during some of the lectures, on-site visits to the Dept of Plant Biology and the Botanic Garden will be organized; On-site visits will also be organized to the Museum of Natural History of the old Accademia dei Fisiocritici and to the famous Ospedale Santa Maria della Scala;

The final objective of the course is to enable students to confidently and creatively express principal ideas and scientific concepts in the target language. Lessons are primarily held in Italian (target language). At the beginning of each new topic, a portion of the lesson will aim to build up the new vocabulary in order to facilitate lessons. However, more complex readings might be done in English and coupled with comprehension activities in the target language to balance the learning process that will be regularly monitored with specifically designed class activities.

** This course includes a lab component which will be transcripted as BI 399 for 1 credit.
Contact Hours: 60
3.0 Credits
Chemistry | Course #: SC FT 300 | Open
This course combines passion and science. Tuscany is a land of flavors and tastes, rich in typical products coming from our traditions. But food is also our energy, composed by substances with different properties and characteristics. Day by day students will increase their awareness of food usage and its properties. Food will be analyzed starting from its composition and chemical structure to its usage in everyday life, not forgetting its application in special diets.

Students will be involved in the creation of their own diet that reflects to their individual needs and imagination. Students will create numerous alternatives to their usual menus, respecting a healthy balance of chemical compounds. Starting from theory we shall involve students in practical exercises, visiting sites of food production and distribution. Practical sessions will involve the experience of working in a vegetable garden, visiting vineyards and chemical labs for analyses.

The objective of this course is to acquire awareness of scientific skills and attitudes, developing a scientific interpretation of theoretical concepts on the field. This course will provide the students with general knowledge of chemical structure and power of food through the observation and analysis of its main compounds. We will accompany the student on a brief but complete journey through traditional cooking in Siena, exploring the influence of Siena"s rich gastronomic history. The final aim of the course is to integrate different culture types of alimentation combining healthy habits with scientific knowledge.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Pharmaceutical Studies | Course #: SC CV 400 | Open
The objective of this course is to acquire an awareness of scientific skills and attitudes, while developing a critical interpretation of theoretical concepts on the field.This course will provide the students with general knowledge of pharmaceutical principles but the main aim is to apply them on the job with different types of simulations. We will accompany the student on a brief but complete voyage through the pharmaceutical world within the Siena city network. Particular focus will be on the influence of the historical background of Siena (Sclavo/Novartis pharmaceutical company), as well as Siena"s famous artistic and naturalistic patrimony.

An important aim of the course is to present the typical scientific life experience, attempting to create a personal and critical view of the pharmaceutical world. In their personal journals, students will elaborate their judgment, developing ideas, doubts, and thoughts to be discussed in classroom at the beginning of each lesson for a dedicated time.

Contact Hours: 45

Service Learning & Volunteer
Students in all SIS programs perform service in the community through the IC partner Ulisse Cultural Association. This service can range from 1-5 hours a week, with opportunities in a variety of service sites. Students might set tables at the city soup kitchen, visit with the elderly at a nursing home, teach English to local elementary school children or volunteer on the city ambulance. Volunteering in the community is an important way to improve language skills, get involved in the local social fabric and make a genuine contribution to the host community. For more information on volunteering see SIS Service Learning & Volunteer.

Courses & Schedule
SIS courses run Monday – Friday. SAI students enroll in a 3 week intensive language course (3 credits) that takes place at the beginning of the semester. After the intensive language course students take one Italian Language course (6 credits) along with 2 or 3 elective courses for a total of 15 – 18 credits. A typical schedule includes Italian Language in the mornings Monday through Friday and elective courses in the afternoons three days a week.

Course Registration
Students complete their course registration during the SAI application process by selecting their primary course choices as well as required alternate courses. Course schedules are confirmed in Siena after students have been given an introduction to the courses and finalized which courses they will take.


Pre-Departure Calendar
June 15 2017
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
May 1 2017
50% of Total Program Fee Due*
*Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
June 15 2017
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
July 1 2017
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
July 1 2017
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
August 1 2017
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-site Calendar
September 3 2017
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Pisa International Airport Galileo Galilei (PSA). Students must arrive by 2:30pm for the group shuttle to Siena where students are transferred to family housing.
September 4 – 8 2017
SIS Academic Orientation
SIS holds week-long orientation activities and events including walking tours and group social events.
September 11 2017
3 Week Intensive Language Classes Begin
Coming Soon
4 Day Group Excursion
Coming Soon
Regular Semester Courses Begin
These courses include semester language and electives.
Coming soon
Fall Break (no class)
Students must vacate their host family’s home for this time period unless other arrangements are made directly with the family.
December 11 – 15 2017
Final Exams
December 18 2017
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI services (see What's Included).
$15,950
Optional / Additional Fees:
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Please note: students from some affiliate universities have different payment arrangements that may require students to pay different deposits to SAI and some fees directly to the affiliate university instead of SAI. Please contact your study abroad office or the SAI business department for further details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Pisa
$900 $1,700
Visa
$50 $75
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
Course fees are sometimes imposed to cover field trips.
$25 / course $50 / course
Meals
Host family supplies all meals except eating out.
Included $100 / month
Personal Expenses $250 / month $350 / month
Transportation within Siena
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$100 / month $150 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • Staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • Orientation to the host city and school
  • 4 day weekend excursion
  • Weekly cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Reception
Upon arrival, new students, host families and SIS faculty and staff unite at a welcome reception to kick off the semester.

Natural Hot Springs Spa
Students visit the San Giovanni Terme Spa in the town of Rapolano Terme and relax in the therapeutic waters. The spa features a series of large pools fed by the nearby natural springs and overlooks the rolling Tuscan hills.

4-Day Group Excursion
This excursion varies each term.

Hiking: Tuscan Coast
Students explore the breathtaking Tuscan coast by hiking to a secluded cove or relaxing on the dunes along the Mediterranean Sea. After beach time, the group heads to the breathtaking medieval town of Castiglione della Pescaia to explore and sample the best gelato around.

I Bottini: Siena’s Underground Aqueducts
Students tour the Bottini with a local guide, exploring a portion of the miles of galleries that run underneath the city of Siena. Carved during medieval times, the Bottini were used to gather Siena’s drinking water for centuries, feeding the many fountains scattered throughout the city.

Wine Tasting: Montalcino/Montepulciano
Students visit a winery, learn about the wine-making process, and enjoy various tastings.

Assisi and Perugia: Nestle’s Perugina Chocolate Factory
Students visit the city of Assisi, the home of St. Francis of Assisi. The group learns about his life and works and tours the famous Basilica di San Francesco. Following Assisi, students take a tour of the Perugina Chocolate Factory in Perugia that produces the delicious Baci (kiss) chocolates.

Day Trip to Florence
SIS Art History professor accompanies students on a day trip to Florence to visit the Uffizi Gallery and explore the city.

Typical Products: Cinta Senese Prosciutto & Pecorino Cheese Tastings
Students visit a nearby farm that raises the Cinta Senese – a local breed of pig unique to the Siena region that has survived since medieval times. After the farm, students take a tour of a pecorino cheese-making farm followed by an abundant tasting of a variety of cheeses and local meats.

Opera Performance
Students dress up and attend an Italian opera performance in Florence or in Rome.

Tuscan Cooking Lessons
Students learn the art of Italian cooking in two complete, hands-on, Italian cooking lessons, including appetizers, main courses and dessert. Lessons conclude with a tasting of all that is prepared!

Visits to Tuscan Hilltowns
Students explore the Italian countryside, visiting one or more of the quaint towns tucked in the Tuscan hills, such as San Gimignano, Pienza, Montepulciano or Cortona.

Museum Visits in Siena
Students visit various museums in Siena as part of Italian class and other content courses. These include the Duomo, OPA Museum, the Museo Civico, the Santa Maria della Scala, as well as others.

Farewell Dinner
After the exams are completed and final papers handed in, the students, faculty and staff share in a celebratory final meal to reflect upon the program experience and to say final goodbyes before departure.

Standard Housing: Family homestay
All participants are accommodated with local host families. Homestay accommodations include 3 meals a day 7 days a week. Depending on the particular family placement students could be in a shared or private room. Homestays are an integral and indispensable part of all SIS programs, offering students the opportunity to make life-long friends, reinforce the language skills acquired during daily lessons and to experience modern Italian culture from “the inside.” SIS’s carefully selected families, whether a single mother, a young married couple with children or an elderly widow, are all experienced in hosting American students. The host families view this experience as a form of cultural exchange and are eager to share their version of Italian culture with program participants.

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law students studying in Italy for 90 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Those with Italian/EU citizenship are exempted. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

Students must appear in person at the Italian Consulate to present their student visa application. Our Student Visa Office is available to assist students in getting ready for the appointment; SAI provides student visa consulting for all our students at no cost.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.