Sant'Anna Institute
Summer 5 weeks I 2018
3 - 6 credits

SAI’s 5 week summer programs at SA take advantage of the school’s location on the Southern Italy coast, with courses that discuss Mediterranean culture, history and arts. Students enroll in 1 or 2 elective courses for a total of 3 - 6 credits. SAI offers two 5 week summer programs at SA, each with different start dates and course options: Summer I and Summer II.


Application Deadline
March 13, 2018
Apps accepted after deadline as space permits

Application Requirements
Complete online application
Personal statement (300-500 words)
Official transcript
Passport scan (photo page)
Italian privacy consent form

Highlights

  • Summer on the Italian coast
  • Course Highlight: Archeology, Cities of Fire
  • Part-time internships available

Program Dates
May 27, 2018 – June 30, 2018


Eligibility Requirements

Age: 18+

Academic Year: High school graduate or above

Cumulative GPA:* 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale)

* contact SAI if you don’t meet requirements



Arts and Humanities
Business & Administration Studies
Internship
Italian Studies
Sciences
Social Sciences

Arts and Humanities

3.0 Credits
Archaeology | Course #: ANTH 5223 | Open
Archaeology studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course provides a basic introduction to the discipline, focusing on the study of some major Roman cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The program combines the archaeological study with the analysis of the historical, economic and social aspects of the Roman culture of the era. Students participate in several site visits to examine the remains and reconstruction of the ancient cities.

Lessons will include:
- Introduction to the history of Archaeology
- Introduction to Greek history and arts
- Introduction to Roman history and arts
- Geological history of Vesuvius
- Pompeii: the history of the city and its monument
- BBC film: Pompeii, the last day
- Family, slavery and religion of the Roman era
- Economy and Industries of the Roman era
- Site Visit to Pompeii ruins
- Artistic manufacturing in Pompeii
- Games and Education of the Roman era
- Sexuality in Roman colonies
- Houses, Villas, Decorations
- Site Visit to Oplontis
- Herculaneum: the history of the city and its monument
- Site Visit to Herculaneum and trip to Vesuvius
- Virtual reconstruction of some quarters of Pompeii and Herculaneum
- Naples: history of the city and its main Greek monument
- Introduction to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples
- Site Visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples
- Campi Flegrei: the Bradisism phenomenon
- Puteoli: history of the city and its monument
- Baia: history of the city and its monument
- Site Visit to Pozzuoli
- Cuma: the myth of Virgilio and the Sibilla
- The main features of Greek and Roman architecture
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Art History | Course #: FNAT 1133 | Open
Art is the highest expression of a culture. Political, historical and social changes lie at the heart of art. Works of art are the reflection of the ages in which they are produced and are often used as a tool to carry messages. During our classes we will focus on the study of the development of art during the centuries and how it affects today's artists. We will have a brief review of the main artistic movements starting from the ancient Greek reaching Italy's Baroque period.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Creative Writing | Course #: LITR 3133 | Open
This course will introduce students to the process and techniques of creative writing (focusing on travel experiences). Students will experiment with various types of writing, including the writing of fiction and poetry. Class readings will expose students to various writing styles and provide examples of the successes and strategies of other writers. Class time will be spent discussing the writer's craft, the assigned readings, and student writing.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Fine Art | Course #: FNAT 2453 | Open
This course is offered to students enrolled at Sant'Anna Institute as part of the study abroad program in Sorrento, Italy. Lectures and field sketching sessions are centered on drawing on location as the best way we have to increase our capacity to observe and to understand reality. An object, a tree, a person, cities or landscapes: during every day life or while traveling, journaling and sketching from real is a profound and lasting experience. While drawing we learn to see and we can select information and highlight details better than we could with a camera.
Students will discover Sorrento and its region of Campania, visiting Naples and surrounding archaeological sites, recording their observations through images and words in a travel sketchbook. Freehand drawing and location drawing as basic and complementary skills are recommended not only among architects, visual artists, animators and graphic designers, but also in disciplines such as archaeology, history, zoology, botany and geology. Classic drawing exercises, as suggested by authors such as Kimon Nicolaides or Betty Edwards, will also help beginners to break the ice with life drawing and get the most out of the experience.


Required Materials:
1. a blank hardback SKETCHBOOK, aprox 5,5'' x 8,5'' size (15x21 cm - A5), min. 65 lb (96 gsm) - Canson, Daler Rowny, Moleskine (the "watercolor" kind only).
2. a WATERCOLOR paper block, aprox 9'' x 12'' (30x20 cm - A4), 140 lb (300 gsm), cold pressed surface, best if 100% cotton. (Canson /Arches, Fabriano, Cotman, Strathmore...)
3. a WATERCOLOR BOX filled with 3 to 8 colors (tubes or pans) or a BOX SET of 10 to 12 pans are made by Windsor&Newton (and Cotman, the cheaper version), Schmincke, Daniel Smith, Sennellier.
If you buy an empty box you can choose your colors and start with a limited palette:
- 3 colors palette: Ultramarine Blue, Cadmium Yellow Pale, Cadmium Red Deep
- 6 colors palette: add Cobalt Blue, Burnt Sienna, Alizarine Crimson
- 8 colors palette: add Ivory Black or Sepia, Yellow Ochre
4. 3 BRUSHES: a waterbrush, large size; a flat brush n.10 to16, a round brush n.10 to 16
5. a BIC ballpoint black pen and a waterproof roller pen or a fountain pen with waterproof ink
6. a water soluble pen, like the italian Tratto Pen
7. a soft pencil like EBONY-design or 4B to 9B pencil and one medium soft pencil (HB to 2B), sharpener and eraser

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Cinema | Course #: FILM 3113 | Open
Lesson plan:
- Warm up activities: Italian cinema
- Introduction: Italian cinema from Fascism to Neo-realism.
- Italy and World War II
- Key-sequences taken from: Ossessione, by Luchino Visconti.
- Film screening of Ladri di biciclette, by Vittorio De Sica.
- Ideologic and stylistic characteristics of Italian Neo-realism.
- The Masters of Neo-realism: Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Luchino Visconti.
- Key-sequences taken from: Roma città aperta, by Roberto Rossellini and Riso amaro, by Giuseppe De Santis.
- Italian Neo-realism: in group brainstorming technique.
- The break with tradition: Rossellini beyond Neo-realism.
- Key-sequences taken from the documentary Roberto Rossellini, directed by Carlo Lizzani.
- Italian Cinema in the 1960s 1. Film industry and film genres.
- Film genres A. Western Italian Style: Sergio Leone and Spaghetti Western.
- Key-sequences taken from Era una volta il West by Sergio Leone.
- Film genres B. Comedy Italian Style: Mario Monicelli, Pietro Germi, Luigi Comencini, Dino Risi, Ettore Scola, Franco Brusati.
- The main themes: family, law, church, Italians abroad.
- Key-sequences taken from: I soliti ignoti, by Mario Monicelli; Sedotta e abbandonata, by Pietro Germi; Pane e cioccolata, by Franco Brusati.
- Italian Cinema in the 1960s 2. Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni. Keysequences taken from: La dolce vita by Federico Fellini.
- Italian cinema in the 1960s: in group brainstorming technique.
- Italian political cinema in the 1970s: Francesco Rosi, Elio Petri, Gillo Pontecorvo.
- Key-sequences taken from Ogro, by Gillo Pontecorvo.
- The killer is among us: Dario Argento and the urban horror of the 1970s.
- Key-sequences taken from uccello dalle piume di cristallo and Il gatto a nove code, by Dario Argento.
- Film screening of Nuovo Cinema Paradiso, by Giuseppe Tornatore.
- Italina cinema in the 1980s: an introduction.
- Cinema and TV in Italy in the 1980s.
- The New Auteurs and the heritage of Neo-realism: Gianni Amelio, Gabriele Salvatores, Giuseppe Tornatore, Nanni Moretti.
- Key-sequences taken from: Ladro di bambini and Lamerica, by Gianni Amelio.
- Italian Cinema in the 1980s: in group brainstorming technique.
- Young filmmakers in the new Millennium: from Marco Tullio Giordana to Paolo Sorrentino.
- Key-sequences taken from: Romanzo Criminale, by Michele Placido; Le conseguenze dell'amore, by Paolo Sorrentino; La giusta distanza, by Carlo Mazzacurati; Lascia perdere
Johnny, by Fabrizio Bentivoglio.
- Film screening of I cento passi, by Marco Tullio Giordana.
Reference texts: 1) Peter Bondanella, A History of Italian Cinema, Continuum International Publishing Group, 2001; 2) Gianpiero Brunetta, The History of Italian Cinema: A Guide to Italian Film from Its Origins to the Twenty-First Century, Princeton University Press, 2009.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Photography | Course #: FNAT 2553 | Open
Introduction to Digital Photography gives students fundamental skills for effectively recording travel, home, andwork experiences. Using digital photography as a tool, students are encouraged to become more carefulobservers of the people, the landscape, the art, the architecture, and the culture that they encounter in their dailylives. The course concentrates on technical lectures and lab/studio time regarding the basic operation of a digitalcamera and the processing of images. Students develop an understanding of the elements that combine to createpowerful visual images: subject matter, composition, color, and light. Through selected readings, assignments,lab/studio time, and critiques, students produce a written and visual final project for the course. Students areresponsible for providing their own cameras, supplies, and image editing software.


Required Material:
1. a semi professional camera (phones will not be accepted as cameras).


Please Note: This course meets regularly on Mondays and occasionally will need to meet on Fridays instead for particular site visits.

Contact Hours: 45

Business & Administration Studies

3.0 Credits
Business | Course #: BUAD 6213 | Open
Course Description: This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to business in the European Union. The course describes how economic, political and social factors interrelate, and influence business in Europe. Students will use a framework to research sustainable business practices from different European Union member states perspective. Guest lecturers and field trips are planned for students enrolled in the study abroad program.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:
- Analyze the origins of the EU, its history and development to the point of enlargement.
- Identify important steps in EU integration, name EU institutions and identify policy areas that are importantto the business environment in Europe.
- Determine how business and trade are conducted both internally and externally by the organizations of the EU.
- Analyze the impact of the social and cultural influences brought about by the enlargement of the EU.
- Conduct a sustainable business analysis for companies operating in the European business environment
- Analyze how companies should react and position themselves strategically and operationally responding to key issues in Europe involving sustainable business environment.
Contact Hours: 45
The course aims to analyze the relationship between sustainability, economy, quality and globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and sustainable development. Other included topics will be: the food industry in Italy (focusing on the Campania region), slow food, organic farming in Italy, “local food, local market, local business” and sustainable tourism in Italy.

Topics: Sustainability Vs economy?; European Union and sustainable development: strategic guidelines and contradictions; Landscape, natural parks, culture: preserving heritage and assets; The threats to Italian landscape and productive system; Cultural diversity in Italy: figures, products and geographies.; Tradition and family business: case studies in Italy/Campania Region; Quality Vs globalization; Organic farming in Italy; Farms, restaurants and food industry in Italy; Local food local market, local business; Sustainable tourism in Italy; Corporate Social Responsibility and customers" power.
Contact Hours: 45

Internship

3.0 Credits
Internship | Course #: INT 3990 | Open
This course is a guided practicum, which includes an internship in a field setting as well as academic coursework for reflection and documentation of the skills practiced.
Internships are available in the following areas:
- Education
- Marketing
- International Business
- Sales
- Tourism
- Hospitality (Front Desk/Guest Services, Event Planning, Restaurant Manager Assistant, Chef Assistant, Bakeries)
- Culinary Arts
- Architecture
- Web and Graphic Design
- Interior Design
- Journalism
Contact Hours: 150

Italian Studies

3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 1303 | Open
Focus:1) Present tense of to be and to have; 2) Definitive and indirect articles; 3) Gender and singular/plural of nouns and adjectives; 4) Present tense of regular verbs; 5) Basic prepositions; 6) A glance at compound prepositions; 7) Greetings and introductions; 8) Numbers, time, days, months, seasons; 9) Present tense of irregular verbs (to go, to go out, etc...); 10) Possessive adjectives and pronouns; 11) Demonstrative adjectives and pronouns; 12) Qualifying adjectives and pronouns; 13) Comparatives and superlatives of adjectives; 14) Simple biographical information ( i.e. family, job, house, traditions, holidays); 15) Present Perfect of regular and irregular verbs; 16) Reflexive verbs; 17) Descriptions of people and places; 18) Daily situations (ordering in a restaurant, phone calls, health matters, taxi, post office)

Text Books: Sorrento Lingue's own book: Studiamo Italiano.
Objective: The student can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases; The student can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has; can interact in a simple way provided the other
person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
Listening: The student can recognize familiar words and very basic phrases concerning himself, his family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.
Reading: The student can understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogs.
Spoken Interaction" The student can interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or re-phrase things at a slower rate of speech and help him formulate what he iss trying to say. He can ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
Spoken Production: The student can use simple phrases and sentences to describe where he lives and people he knows.
Writing: The student can write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings. He can fill in forms with personal details, for example entering name, nationality and address on a hotel registration form.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 2303 | Open
Focus:1) A review of Present Perfect; 2) A deeper understanding of adjectives and pronouns; 3) Travel experiences; 4) Listening to simple dialogues and Italian songs; 5) Various uses of Imperfect Tense; 6) Difference of the use between Present Perfect and Imperfect Tense; 7) Descriptions of persons, places and situations in the past; 8) Expressing memories; 9) Traditions, art and culture; 10) Future Tense; 11) Making plans and predictions; 12) Direct pronouns; 13) Use of the particles ci and ne; 14) Compare and analyze alternative viewpoints.

Text Books: 1) Sorrento Lingue's own book: Studiamo Italiano. 2) Katerin Katerinov: La Lingua Italiana per Stranieri 2, Edizioni Guerra, direc.
Description: The student can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment); can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters; can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
Listening: The student can understand phrases and the widest used vocabulary related to areas of immediate personal relevance (eg very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). He can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements.
Reading: The student can read very short, simple texts. He can find specific, predictable information in simple, everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and he can understand short simple personal letters.
Spoken Interaction: The student can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. He can handle very short social exchanges.
Spoken Production: The student can use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms his family and other people, living conditions, his educational background and his present or most recent job.
Writing: The student can write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need. He can write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 3303 | Open
Focus:1) Review of the Future Tense and of direct pronouns; 2) Anterior Future Tense; 3) Indirect pronouns; 4) Express preferences and wishes; 5) Develop listening, writing and comprehension abilities; 6) Connective analysis; 7) Present Conditional; 8) Give advice and express opinions; 9) Deeper understanding of body vocabulary; 10) Review of irregular nouns; 11) Reading of small texts and brief articles taken from newspapers.

Text Books: Katerin Katerinov: La Lingua Italiana per Stranieri 2, Edizioni Guerra.
Objective: The student can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc; can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken; can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest; can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
Listening: The student can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. He can understand the main point of many radio or TV programs on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.
Reading: The student can understand texts that consist mainly of widely used everyday or job-related language. He can understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters.
Spoken Interaction: The student can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. He can handle very short social exchanges.
Spoken Production: The student can use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms his family and other people, living conditions, his educational background and his present or most recent job.
Writing: The student can write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. The student can write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 4303 | Open
Focus:1) General review of all simple tenses; 2) Present Perfect; 3) Communicating in different situations (i.e. formal vs informal); 4) Compound Pronouns; 5) Deeper understanding of adverbs; 6) Past Conditional; 7) Compare and analyze alternative viewpoints; 8) Past Tense; 9) Past Perfect Tense; 10) Writing stories, fables and news; 11) A deeper study of Italian culture through typical songs; 12) Reading of Italian literature authors.

Text Books: Katerin Katerinov: La Lingua Italiana per Stranieri 2, Edizioni Guerra.
Objective: The student can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation; can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers possible without restraint from either party; can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
Listening: The student can understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar. He can understand most TV news and current affairs programs. He can understand the majority of films in standard dialect.
Reading: The student can read articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems in which the writers adopt particular stances or viewpoints. He can understand contemporary literary prose.
Spoken Interaction: The student can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers possible. He can take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, account for and sustain his views.
Spoken Production: The student can present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to his field of interest. He can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
Writing: The student can write clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects related to his interests. He can
write an essay or report, passing on information or giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view. He can write letters highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 5303 | Open
Focus:1) Relative pronouns; 2) Direct and Indirect Imperative; 3) Idiomatic sentences; 4) Small differences of meaning between very similar words; 5) Gerunds, Passive and active paraphrases; 6) Indirect adjectives and pronouns; 7) Diminutive and augmentative adjectives and pronouns; 8) Watch and debate Italian movies; 9) Express emotions; 10) Discuss poetic writings; 11) Subjunctive: present and past; 12) Making judgments and evaluation; 13) Regional aspects of Italian; 14) Writing and answering to an advertisement.


Text Books: T. Marin e S. Magnelli: Progetto Italiano 3, Edizioni Edilingua.


Objective: The student can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning; he can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions; can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes; can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.


Listening: The student can understand extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signaled explicitly. He can understand television programs and films without too much effort.


Reading: The student can understand long and complex factual and literary texts, appreciating distinctions of style. He can understand specialized articles and longer technical instructions even when they do not relate to his field.


Spoken Interaction: The student can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers possible. He can take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, account for and sustain his views.


Spoken Production: The student can present clear, detailed descriptions of complex subjects integrating sub-themes, developing particular points and rounding off with an appropriate conclusion.


Writing: The student can express himself in clear, well-structured text, expressing points of view at some length. He can write detailed explanations of complex subjects in a letter, an essay or a report, underlining what he considers to be the salient issues. He can write different kinds of texts in an assured, personal, style appropriate to the reader in mind.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Language | Course #: ITAL 6303 | Open
Focus:1) Review of Subjunctive tenses; 2) Imperfect and Perfect Subjunctive; 3) Moods and Tenses Agreement; 4) Passive of verbs; 5) The impersonal and passive si; 6) Writing a formal letter; 7) Conditional clause; 8) Direct and Indirect speech; 9) Recall and identify the most important points of a conversation; 10) Learning Agenda; 11) Watching news and programs in Italian language.


Text Books: T. Marin e S. Magnelli: Progetto Italiano 3, Edizioni Edilingua.


Objective: The student can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read; can summarize information from different spoken and written sources, re-constructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation; can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.


Listening: The student has no difficulty understanding any kind of spoken language, whether live or broadcast, even when delivered at fast native speed, provided he has some time to get familiar with the accent.


Reading: The student can read with ease virtually all forms of the written language, including abstract, structurally or linguistically complex texts such as manuals, specialized articles and literary works.


Spoken Interaction: The student can take part effortlessly in any conversation or discussion and have a good familiarity with idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. He can express himself fluently and convey finer shades of meaning precisely. If he does have a problem he can backtrack and restructure around the difficulty so smoothly that other people are hardly aware of it.



Spoken Production: The student can present a clear, smooth-flowing description or argument in a style appropriate to the context and with an effective logical structure which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points.


Writing: The student can write clear, smooth-flowing text in an appropriate style. He can write complex letters, reports or articles which present a case with an effective logical structure which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points. He can write summaries and reviews of professional or literary works.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ITAL 5113 | Open
Students will study Italian literature of the Twentieth Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include Pirandello, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Montale and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ITAL 5223 | Open
Pre-requisite: **Course in taught in Italian. Text provided in both Italian and English
Students will study Italian literature from the 17th to 19th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include G. Leopardi, U. Foscolo, A. Manzoni and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ITAL 5333 | Open
Pre-requisite: **Course in taught in Italian. Text provided in both Italian and English
Dante Alighieri is the most important Italian poet, the father of Italian language and the principle figure of Medieval Literature in Europe. This course will examine Dante's Divine Comedy and some other minor works of his (i.e.Vita Nuova and Convivio). The course aim is to allow students to examine his internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Italian Literature | Course #: ITAL 5443 | Open
Pre-requisite: **Course in taught in Italian. Text provided in both Italian and English
Students will study Italian literature from the 14th to the 16th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ariosto, Tasso, Machiavelli, and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition.
Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.
Contact Hours: 45

Sciences

3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: BIOL 1133 | Open
This course focuses on the biology of organisms residing in the sea, from the diversity of planktonic communities to marine megafauna, taking into consideration the ecological principles that govern marine life. The course aims to provide a solid educational background in basic and applied marine biology. Emphasis will be placed on marine environment issues and the adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms of organisms that allow them to occupy marine habitats. In particular, the Mediterranean Sea will play a central role in the course subjects, profiting from the availability of unique ecosystems and a nearby renown marine research institute to conduct thematic field trips and practical tutorials.

Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: GEOL 1133 | Open
This course aims to give an introduction to the science of geology. In particular, the main types of rocks are analyzed with an emphasis on genetic processes and in relationship to plate tectonics theory. This basic knowledge will provide a background to understand and study the main geological risks, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, floods and landslides. Specific examples from the Apennines mountain chain and Campanian plain will be examined to contextualize these topics in the Italian environment. In addition, a significant aim of this course is for students to gain a conscious relationship with the environment. The Campania region is an ideal place for experiential learning via site visits, with the opportunity for students to witness a wide range of geological features.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
Natural Science | Course #: GEOL 1233 | Open
This course is an introduction to the main elements of geological sciences including stratigraphy laws, the main types of rocks, and an understanding of faults and folds. These elements will be used to understand Plate Tectonics theory. Using this theory, different kinds of volcanoes will be analyzed, examining different magmatic compositions, igneous and pyroclastic rocks and their geodynamic environments. The role of geologic and geomorphologic processes will be analyzed in reference to volcanic risk. This course will also study landslides in volcanic soils (the case of Sarno mounts) and groundwater flow in volcanic aquifers and exploitation of thermal waters (the case of Ischia).
Contact Hours: 45

Social Sciences

3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HIST 1113 | Open
This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, post-War Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HIST 1123 | Open
The course examines the history of the Mafia from its origins to the present day. How the Mafia works and has succeeded, as well as approaches to combating the Mafia are also examined, including the reaction of civil society organizations. Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, it's past and present role in politics, and it's evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. The class also examines the ethics of the Mafia actions throughout time.

Topics: 1) Mafia is no fiction: figures, names and faces of mafia in the real world; 2) The different criminal organizations in Italy: origins and brief history; 3) The different criminal organizations in Italy: how they work, how they succeed; 4) South of Italy: mafias vs development?; 5) Fighting mafias in Italy: policies and institutional actors; 6) Fighting mafias in Italy: the revolution of civil society; 7) Mafias: illegal business and the grey area; 8) Environmental crimes: waste dumping, illegal building; 9) Mafias, politics and the waste emergency in the Campania region; 10) Mafias and political power: the governance of corruption; 11) Italian mafias and their international reach; 12) Sustainability as a tool to limit mafias: the example of Penisola Sorrentina.
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HIST 1223 | Open
Description: In this course, students will examine Italian history, beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. The clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom and terrorism in the 1970s will also be analyzed. Students will later examine the political degeneration of the 80s, "Tangentopoli" and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. Particular attention will be devoted to foreign policy, focusing on Italy's role in the international arena with an emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. The faculty will generate a critical discussion on these topics, inviting students to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that they study.
Topics: Italy during the reconstruction after the II World War; European and the American influence in Italy; the development of consumption; families and consumption; the Italian economy: the triumph of the public sector; the role of the parties in the Italian society: democracy Italian style; the 1970"s and the season of violence: mafia, massacres and terrorists; Italy in G7; civil society and mass culture; Tangentopoli and the transformation of the political system; the new society: immigration, women's new roles, the new Right; Italy in 2000 - 2010
Contact Hours: 45
3.0 Credits
History | Course #: HIST 1333 | Open
The goal of this course is to offer a wide introduction to the main evolution of the Mediterranean using not just History but its cultures, religions and peoples as well. The main topics covered are: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Greece, Rome, Germanics, Byzantines, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the Renaissance, the different Mediterranean families and the Modernization of the Mediterranean Societies. These topics will not be covered chronologically but by item. Although, each lecture will maintain a chronological structure. At the end of each module, students will be invited to prepare and present oral presentations covering one of the topics of the module.
At the end of the course, students will write a 15-page essay concerning one of the topics studied during the course.
Contact Hours: 45

Program Add-On: Internship
Summer students participating in the 5 week program can apply for a part time 3 credit internship to be completed as part of the 3 credit program option. Students are placed in internships that complement their major or minor, and are supported by ongoing reflective coursework. At the completion of the internship students produce an analytical paper that synthesizes what they have learned. Please note that there is an additional fee for completing an internship. For more information on internships see SA Internships.

Service Learning & Volunteer
Sant’Anna Institute holds service learning as a pillar of academic excellence. Courses are intimately connected to the needs of various aspects of the community; they work in tandem with the community to create new ideas and new visions for future improvement. Service learning projects allow students to apply what they learn in the classroom in a professional manner, which develops their skills and gives back to their host community. For more information on volunteer work see SA Service Learning & Volunteer.

Part-Time Internship Application Requirements
Students wishing to participate in a part-time internship during their program should select the Internship program add-on at application, and complete the following additional application items:

  • SA internship application; emailed once the SAI application is received
  • Resume and cover letter
  • Skype interview

Courses & Schedule
SA courses run Monday – Friday. Students take one or two electives. Course schedules are confirmed 4 weeks prior to the program start.

Course Registration
Students complete their course registration during the SAI application process by selecting their primary course choices as well as required alternate courses.


Pre-Departure Calendar
March 13 2018
Application Deadline
Applications accepted after deadline as space permits.
Within 1 week of acceptance
SAI Deposits Due
$500 Confirmation Deposit (applied toward program fee)
$300 Security Deposit (refundable)
February 26 2018
50% of Total Program Fee Due
Students who are accepted and submit SAI deposits after this date will have an amended pay schedule. Either 50% or 100% of Program Fee will be due within 5 business days, based on the date of acceptance.
March 15 2018
SAI Scholarship Application Deadline
Students wishing to apply for an SAI scholarship must have all application items submitted by 11:59pm Pacific Time on this date.
March 28 2018
Balance of Total Program Fee Due
March 28 2018
SAI Financial Aid Verification Deadline
Students wishing to defer payment until student loan disbursement must submit the financial aid verification forms to SAI by this date.
April 27 2018
SAI Pre-Departure Form Due

On-site Calendar
May 27 2018
Arrival & Housing Check-in
Students arrive into Naples International Airport (NAP). Students should arrive accordingly for the 12pm and 5pm airport pick up service. Upon arrival in Sorrento students are taken to housing.
May 28 2018
SA Academic Orientation & Welcome Events
SA academic orientation is followed by a walking tour of Sorrento and a group meal.
May 29 2018
Classes Begin
June 29 2018
Classes End
June 30 2018
Program End & Housing Check-out
Students must move out of housing by 10:00am to return home or pursue independent travel.
SAI Program Fees* USD
Application Fee $100
Security Deposit
Refundable at the end of the term.
$300
Program Fee: 3 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What's Included).
$5,650
Program Fee: 6 credits
Includes tuition, standard housing and SAI Signature Services (see What’s Included).
$6,400
Optional / Additional Fees:
Program Add-On: Part-Time Internship
Required for students participating in a part-time internship.
$400
Optional Private Room Housing Supplement
Private room in dorm / shared apartment, with a shared bathroom.
$225
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement: Shared
Family homestay housing in shared occupancy room. Includes breakfast and dinner daily.
$300
Optional Homestay Housing Supplement: Private
Family homestay housing in private occupancy room. Includes breakfast and dinner daily.
$600
International Mailing Supplement
Students residing outside the U.S. are charged an international mailing supplement to ensure visa paperwork arrives in a timely manner.
$85

*prices are subject to change

Note: certain SAI-affiliated US universities require specific payment arrangements. These may require that some fees are paid by the student directly to SAI, and other fees are paid to SAI by the affiliated university on behalf of the student. If you attend an SAI-affiliated university please contact your study abroad office or speak with your SAI Admissions Counselor for details.

Budget Low Est. High Est.
Airfare to/from Naples
$900 $1,700
Books, Supplies & Course Fees
Course fees are sometimes imposed to cover field trips.
$25 / course $50 / course
Meals
Combination of cooking at home and eating out.
$600 / month $1,000 / month
Personal Expenses $250 / month $350 / month
Transportation within Sorrento area
Public transportation with some taxi rides.
$50 / month $100 / month
Weekend Travel
Cost varies greatly by student.
$300 / month $1,000 / month

This is an SAI Signature Services Program; it includes our full services!

  • Program tuition and U.S. academic credit
  • Accommodation in carefully selected student housing
  • Airport pickup and transportation on arrival day
  • Student health insurance providing full coverage and medical emergency evacuation
  • Cell phone rental with free incoming calls and texts while in host country
  • Staff on-site dedicated to providing personal assistance
  • Orientation to the host city and school
  • Frequent cultural activities and day trips
  • 24-hour on-site emergency support

Pre-departure and Re-entry services

  • Admissions counselor assigned to you, providing friendly assistance throughout your study abroad experience
  • Helpful pre-departure tools and resources
  • Online student groups to acquaint you with other SAI students
  • Assistance with student visa application
  • Assistance with financial aid and loan processing
  • Paid registration fees for national re-entry conferences
  • SAI Ambassador Program for SAI alumni, with paid internship opportunities
  • SAI alumni network

SAI offers activities, at no extra cost, for students to get to know their community, city and country. Following is a sample of the activities included in this program. Please note that actual activities may differ.

Welcome Event
All students are invited to a typical Italian meal welcoming them to the program and their host city.

Welcome Tour of Sorrento
Students tour Sorrento, including stops at popular shops, supermarkets, and places of entertainment, as well as important landmarks such as main squares, post offices, bus stops and taxi stands.

Pompeii
Students visit the Roman city of Pompeii, buried by volcanic ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD 79. Though the site is still not fully excavated, visitors can see the ruins of villas, ancient temples and the Stabian Baths to gain an intimate knowledge of how wealthy Romans lived 2,000 years ago.

Gelato Making Course
Students visit the lab of a gelato shop and learn how to make the perfect Italian gelato as well as the techniques to blend different flavors. After the course students enjoy their creation.

Farewell Event
After classes are over students and staff share in a celebratory final meal to reflect and say goodbyes.

Standard Housing: Student dorm / apartment
Standard housing includes student dorm or apartment living, assigned as available. The student dorms and apartments are convenient, clean, and well equipped, with shared occupancy bedrooms (upgrade to private bedroom available). Dorm rooms include shared en suite bathroom, desk space, shared community kitchen and living space. Typical apartments house 2 – 8 students and contain a combination of private and shared bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living areas. Furnishings, a washing machine, basic kitchen supplies, bed linens and towels are provided. Dorms and apartments are equipped with wireless internet.

Optional Housing: Family homestay (additional fee applies)
Students choosing the family homestay option will be placed with a local family, which could be an older married couple or a family with children. Homestay families are typically within a short walking distance to the school. The homestay option includes breakfast and dinner 7 days a week in a shared occupancy room (upgrade to a private bedroom available).

Passports
Passports should be valid for 3 months after planned departure from Italy.

Student Visas
In accordance with Italian law U.S. students studying in Italy for 90 days or more are required to obtain a student visa. Therefore all U.S. students do not require a student visa for this program. Non-US nationals should consult their local Consulate for information on student visa requirements.

About SAI

SAI Programs is dedicated to providing academic and cultural learning experiences abroad that enhance global awareness, professional development and social responsibility. We concentrate our programs in Europe, with a focus on in-depth learning of individual European countries and their unique global role in the geopolitical economy, humanities, and in the arts.